1 Reply Latest reply on May 31, 2016 5:41 AM by Steve Grisetti

    Can someone explain how to insert a simple audio crossfade across two clips?

    PolarBear74

      I am using Premiere Elements 11 and 12 on both Windows 10 and Windows 7 (both versions on both OS versions).  I purchased Premiere Elements a few years ago to edit family video.  I purchased the "classroom in a book" for PE12.  I continue to struggle with audio transitions and how they are designed to work.  The book devotes an entire nine sentences to audio transitions, most of which tell the reader they work like video transitions.  Audio transition configuration does not work like video transition configuration.

      For example, I have two clips.  I apply an iris video transition lasting 2 seconds between the clips.  I want to add an accompanying audio crossfade, and my frustrations begin.  First, I am presented with the vague "constant gain" vs "constant power" thing, which has been much discussed in this and other video editing forums.  I'll leave that for another post.  Now I click on either of these transitions and drag to the point between the two clips, but my cursor either puts the transition totally on the first clip or totally on the second, no way to drop it between clips.  Then I double-click the transition to manually edit its properties.  Whoops, I can change the duration, but the controls to place the transition, left clip, between clips, or right clip, are grayed-out (as in disabled).  Putting the transition on the left side or the right side is unsatisfactory, with the first clip ending abruptly or the second clip starting abruptly (soundwise).  So this means I have to drag two audio transitions onto the timeline for every video transition I apply.  OR, I just don't understand how to use the feature.  I'm hoping this is the case and someone will enlighten me, because I have 25 or 40 of these transitions in the average 60-minute family video.  I have a lot 60-minute videos to create.

      Please help!

        • 1. Re: Can someone explain how to insert a simple audio crossfade across two clips?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Hey, you should have bought my book, "The Muvipix Guide to Premiere Elements 12"!

           

          From your question, it sounds like by Crossfade, you mean audio crossfade and not video crossfade, right? They're very different effects.

           

          The position that the transition lands on the clips is based where the program judges them best to fit.

           

          As I show you in my book, every transition -- video or audio -- needs a little extra footage beyond the end of the clip in order to create the transition. In other words, in a one-second transition, you need half a second more of the first clip and half a second more of the second clip in order to create the transitional segment for when both clips appear on-screen or are transitioning from one to another. If you are at the very end of the first clip and the very beginning of the second clip, the program has to create the extra frames by adding a still image to fill in for the footage that has not been providing.

           

          If one clip is trimmed back but the other is not, the program will move the transition over one clip or the other to take advantage of the fact that one clip has extra footage to create the transition. (The illustration in my book makes it clearer than my description.)

           

          In short, if you want to control where the transition falls, you need to trim back half a second or so off the end of the first clip and half a second or so off the beginning of the second. (This is not unique to Premiere Elements, by the way. It's how all video editors work.) Then you can manually set where the transition falls.

           

          BTW, as I also explain in the book, the difference between Constant Gain and Constant Power is negligible. Most people can't hear the difference. Though most audiofiles consider Constant Power to create a more natural transition.