4 Replies Latest reply on Jun 21, 2016 9:52 AM by Brian38511844

    Flash is too bright in photo (glare), reflected off plastic packaging - thoughts? *New Person*

    Brian38511844

      Boring Intro Question Below (Sorry this is long - it might my my tagline/intro post) !

      First let me start off with saying I am dangerous.  I drop the money then run, fail and run.  Because of specific circumstance I am not going to take photos of all my own retail products for the next 2-3 months.  I can absolutely do it.  But it is a night mare.  I am selling B2B (online auction), BTC (Online) retail website.  I want to learn this on my own, I just think it is fun.  I can not put any more money into this than I already have.  I have a $200 Walmart Olympus camera (sorry), Adobe Light Room, Gimp and Photoshop.  I do not think I am going to have time to make a "light box"..  While I care a lot about what my pictures look like,  At the same time this is a temporary job as owner and in the end if I take 100 photos one always winds looking up more than acceptable.

       

      I will never be professional, though  I am taking free Open Source Learning classes on photography.  I did ebay extremely successfully with a $100 camera and some google tools. These are not catalog shots nor am I charging for them.  I do not want to insult people but quality is important but on a scale of 1-10 I will take a 6 if I can spend a few minutes and move it to an 8, I am happy.  I might use the wrong terms and I do not mean to insult anyone.ight

       

      Question Here:
      This happens a lot - yes I know light box, lighting, better camera.  I just can not.http://imgur.com/Bbhwp9c  

       

      Gimp/Photoshop & Lightroom..  How do I minimize that effect?  I have about 400 products with similar packaging and it always happens.  I just reposition the flash take 100 pictures of the same object and one always looks great.  My question is though using the 3 tools I have is there a guide I should read, video or blog?  Do you have a quick 30 second tip?  Usually when it is that bad I just scrap the photo.  Lets pretend the flash was not that horrible.  I know I can not just remove it. I am just looking to minimize it as quickly as possible.  I have a fairly ok idea of how to use the Walmart Camera, GIMP, Photoshop & Lightroom.  Be Gentle please

      I am not asking how to take the photo better.  I am asking for tips using the three tools I have, how to minimize my horrible photography skills, even if just a bit. Most are not that bad.  That said everything you share will be 100% considered but for lightbox/lighting.  Products vary in size from inches (centimeters) to feet (yards).  My wife would punch me if I went out and bought anything else..  Tips on how to use the programs better or very generalized suggestions  I do not need anything near SEARS/Bestbuy magazine quality.  Though one day I will get there.

        • 1. Re: Flash is too bright in photo (glare), reflected off plastic packaging - thoughts? *New Person*
          99jon Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Have you tried turning off the flash and taking the photo in good daylight, perhaps near a window. You could then adjust highlights, shadows and whites to brighten the image.

          • 2. Re: Flash is too bright in photo (glare), reflected off plastic packaging - thoughts? *New Person*
            Brian38511844 Level 1

            After all that writing....

             


            Essentially there is not much to be done post photo to "damage" like that?  (Understand )
            Take more care when I take the photos on reflective surfaces, bounce or use real light.

             

            .  I can do that!  I was just hoping there was a way to minimize after the fact.  Out of 2,352 pictures (it took me a while to get all of them - really). I have about 30-40 with flash "damage" though not as bad.  My problem the product I was taking pictures of, I put away.  I did not notice the bad ones the first time I went through them.  If you genuinely believe that is my best or only option (retake).  There is no way to minimize damage like that with the tools I have (being a novice), I gotta go pull them - lesson learned.  It will take 1 hr drive each way then 30 min to pull each individual item.  I am not complaining about time.  That was the worst one ("Flash damage").  I tried cloning on some others it helped a little (Adobe Lightroom)..  If there is anything else that comes to mind. If not TY & TY! for reading!.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Flash is too bright in photo (glare), reflected off plastic packaging - thoughts? *New Person*
              JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              It seems to me that you want a quick tip on how to make "beginner" photos look professional. Quick tip, you can't. You have an indicator what type of camera you are using. If you have  the option to an external flash so that you can bounce the flash off from a white card, or at least use a diffuser on the flash then you will just have to keep taking images and reject the ones that don't turn out. Every image can't expected to be perfect. Use the good ones, discard the bad ones, take some more, repeat the process. That's one of the beauties of digital photography. You can just keep shooting and only keep the good ones. It hasn't cost you any extra film or processing.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Flash is too bright in photo (glare), reflected off plastic packaging - thoughts? *New Person*
                Brian38511844 Level 1

                No, no.......  I do not expect to considered myself an amateur soon, I am way behind..  This is fun but not me.     I am just here to ask smart people silly questions on occasion.. "I" am a 79 person business.  The girl who does photography for me went and got pregnant.  , I Had to give her a 3-4 mo "maternity" leave (Sarcasm/JK).  So I am stuck with this for a bit.  It is good to learn, I just waited last minute..  I have understanding of some basics and your advice.  TY!