6 Replies Latest reply on Jul 22, 2016 7:08 AM by Karl Heinz Kremer

    Removing random dots or speckles in scanned documents using Adobe Acrobat DC

    carlk72974128

      Paper documents scanned to .pdf often have random dots and speckles on the pages.  What tool in Adobe Acrobat DC do I use to remove or erase them?

       

      [ Mod: Copied information from duplicate posting ]

       

      Scanning paper docs. to .pdf often results in random dots and speckles appearing on the pages.  What tool in Acrobat DC do you use to remove or erase those random dots or speckles?

       

      (I just downloaded DC.  I learning how to use it on the job.  The Adobe salesperson who sold me the produce on July 19, 2016 assured me that DC had such a built-in erasure or removal tool for the removal of random dots and speckles.  So, I want to know where that tool is located in DC.)

       

      Carl Kirsch

       

      [ Mod: Personal information removed ]

        • 1. Re: Removing random dots or speckles in scanned documents using Adobe Acrobat DC
          Karl Heinz Kremer Adobe Community Professional

          On the scanner dialog, you can select to optimize your scanned images, but with newer versions of Acrobat, there is no longer a "despeckle" option (which was there until probably Acrobat 9). You can try to see if a combination of the available options will give you a despeckled image. I would try to use the despeckle option that comes with my scanner software. To use that, you would have to select the native scanner user interface vs. Acrobat's scanner interface.

          • 2. Re: Removing random dots or speckles in scanned documents using Adobe Acrobat DC
            carlk72974128 Level 1

            Karl,

             

            Here is what a chat agent suggested as a way of removing random dots and speckles from scanned documents:

             

            Priyanka: I would like to inform you that there is no erase option is present (sic) under Acrobat pro dc
            Priyanka: but yes you can do one thing

            carl kirsch: I should be able to "edit" any speckle or random dot out of existence.
            Priyanka: you can got (sic) to edit pdf and then select text box and then past (sic) it to those places where dots are present
            Priyanka: then select the text box and change the color as white.
            carl kirsch: Okay. That makes sense. So the suggest[ed] solution is to paste a text box over the random speckle or dot and then delete it just like I would do to text. Right?
            Priyanka: there is no need to delete
            Priyanka: you can change the color of the text area
            Priyanka: text field boundry
            Priyanka: boundary *
            carl kirsch: What color would I change to? White?
            Priyanka: yes

            END

             

            ________________________

             

            Karl, what the agent is suggesting is that I go to the "Edit" toolbox, select the "text box" tool and surround the random dot or speckle with a "text box" and, thereafter, change the color of the interior of the text box to the color "white", thereby in effect "erasing" the dot or speckle. 

             

            To me, the agent's suggestion (that I have not tried out yet) is a simple and straightforward workaround to the absence of a specific eraser tool built into Adobe Acobat DC.  What do you think?

             

            (By the way, Nuance's Paperport 14 has an eraser tool. After you scan a document using Paperport's scan function, you can save it to .pdf on Paperport's desktop.  Thereafter, you use Paperport's eraser tool to delete any random dots and speckles on the .pdf document.  After you clean up the .pdf document, in Paperport, you open the cleaned up .pdf doc. with Adobe Acrobat and save the cleaned up .pdf document using Acrobat to any folder on your computer.  Before I bought Adobe Acobat Standard DC ("DC"), I asked the Adobe salesman if DC had such an eraser tool and he said, "Yes; it's built into DC."  Sadly, I now learn no such eraser tool exists in Adobe Acobat Standard DC.  To me, that is a major design flaw in the current versions of DC Standard and Pro. I am very disappointed.  I would demand my money back and return to using Acrobat X, but Adobe no longer supports Acrobat X.  Hopefully, the chat agent's suggestion above will work, because my Paperport that has worked flawlessly for years has now developed an unresolved problem that is interfering with production of a cleaned up copy of a .pdf document scanned to Paperport.)

             

            Carl Kirsch

             

            • 3. Re: Removing random dots or speckles in scanned documents using Adobe Acrobat DC
              carlk72974128 Level 1

              Karl,

               

              PS: Any "de-speckle" tool is clumsy and inefficient, because such tools do not recognize and eliminate all random dots or speckles; hence, the need for a target specific eraser tool.

              • 4. Re: Removing random dots or speckles in scanned documents using Adobe Acrobat DC
                Karl Heinz Kremer Adobe Community Professional

                Acrobat does not have a pixel level editor (as you now know), and because of that, I wrote an image editor plug-in for a company that I used to work for 10 years ago - unfortunately, it's not available as a standalone product.

                 

                What you can do if you have Adobe Photoshop installed is to edit the image in Photoshop and use all the image editor tools that PS offers to cleanup your document. You can also use other image editors, but you will have to find out what works and how well they are integrated with Acrobat. To do that, select Tools>Edit PDF>Edit, then right-click on an image and select to edit in Adobe Photoshop.

                 

                If that is not possible, then using the workaround with the text box is possible. If you have Adobe Acrobat Pro, you can also use the redaction tool to select all specks and then in a second step change them to white (which hopefully matches your paper color).

                 

                Yes, Acrobat could have a pixel level editing tool, but by using Photoshop, I can usually get what I want with an application that is actually designed to do this kind of stuff. Chances are that whatever would be build into Acrobat would not be as powerful as Photoshop.

                • 5. Re: Removing random dots or speckles in scanned documents using Adobe Acrobat DC
                  carlk72974128 Level 1

                  Dear Karl,

                   

                  Thanks for your help.  However, be advised that I do not have Photoshop and do expect to be compelled to purchase a product I don't want and don't need to address a common and recurring problem in all documents scanned to .pdf.  Moreover, my question was limited to the capabilities of Adobe Acrobat Standard DC to remove random dots and speckles resulting from the scanning hard copies to .pdf.

                   

                  Dots and speckles are common and recurring defects appearing on all digital copies of hard copies scanned to .pdf using any sanning engine. I would have thought the tech guys at Adobe would have addressed the removal of these disfiguring items in Acrobat 12 so as to make the edited .pdf product nearly perfect. How many years must go by before Adobe addresses this common problem in somewhat the same fashion as did Nuance with its Paperport product many years ago with its built in eraser tool?  If Nuance can do it, surely Adobe could have done it in constructing Acrobat 12 using some non-patent violating workaround that enabled the Adobe customer, like me, to remove all disfiguring dots and speckles from the digital .pdf product before printout or electronic transmission.

                   

                  I bought the Adobe Acrobat Standard DC product on a representation by an Adobe salesman that DC Standard had an erasure tool built into its edit engine.  Now I find out that was a misrepresentation of fact.  I am very upset over this misrepresentation, because Acrobat X was serving me well, although Adobe has not abandoned support for it.

                   

                  I am an attorney who produces text documents in standard black on white paper. I am not interested in color reproductions in my .pdf documents.  I don't those features that are available in my word processor either.  My sole concern is the creation of clean and handsome black on white .pdf products that I can be proud of.  Because Adobe Acrobat Standard DC has no eraser tool or efficient substitute, I am a very unhappy customer and will pass my complaint along to other attorneys or perhaps look to them for resolution of the dot and speckle problem, if they have discovered one using Adobe Acrobat Standard DC.

                   

                  Thanks for your help.  My problem was NOT corrected, but you tried.

                   

                  Carl

                  • 6. Re: Removing random dots or speckles in scanned documents using Adobe Acrobat DC
                    Karl Heinz Kremer Adobe Community Professional

                    Carl,

                     

                    if I were in your position, I would try to return the copy of Adobe Acrobat Standard DC that you purchased based on wrong information provided by Adobe.

                     

                    I don't speak for Adobe - I am a user of Adobe's PDF technology - but based on the Acrobat history, I doubt that you will ever see a pixel level editor (or an "erase tool" as you call it) in Acrobat. There is a bit difference between Paperport and Acrobat: Paperport is an application that scans and manages scanned documents. Acrobat is an application that does a lot of things and scanning is just one of the many features it provides. There are features in Acrobat that are not on par with the industry leading applications. OCR is one of them - I keep a dedicated OCR application around for documents that are too challenging for Acrobat (e.g. documents that use two languages), scanning (and specifically the clean up of scanned documents) is another one that a dedicated document scanning application does better.

                     

                    You can file an enhancement request on Adobe's web site for such a feature: Feature Request/Bug Report Form If enough users request such a feature, it may actually get implemented.