3 Replies Latest reply on Aug 1, 2016 8:31 AM by JimHess Branched to a new discussion.

    Image processor in LR

    TheHulk

      Hello! Does Lightroom have capabilities to run the Photoshop image processor? I often edit many PSD's at a time, and using a few actions and the Image processor from bridge I can apply changes to multiple files with the click of a button.

       

      Does LR have the Image processor tool anywhere? Or am I stuck using bridge for the batch PSD edits?

        • 1. Re: Image processor in LR
          elie_di Level 3

          The original conception behind Lightroom a dozen years ago was to combine a Raw processor/editor and a batch export tool like 'Image Processor'. LR will do most things IP will do - except run Photoshop actions and create some of the effects in the lower right menu - and with more control, flexibility and speed.

          • 2. Re: Image processor in LR
            JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Lightroom does not have an image processor function. However, it is possible to make changes to a single image and then highlight that image along with countless others and synchronize the settings. This will apply the settings in the one image to all others that are highlighted. Another option is to enable "Auto sync". This feature allows you to highlight multiple images. You will see one image in the main editing area. But as you apply adjustments to that image those same adjustments will be applied to all highlighted images.

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            • 3. Re: Image processor in LR
              Abambo Adobe Community Professional

              The answer is YES, kind of...

               

              The concept of Lightroom is to have a program that organizes your pictures, so that you can access them easily and to be able to process them like in a darkroom in the old times.

               

              Most of the people do most of the editing in Lightroom and they rarely need to go to Photoshop to do special editing. Lightroom for example does not have a layer concept and does not process text or Illustrator data. It has however all tools you need for non-destructive editing, including dust removal and local adaptations.

               

              You can apply modifications to a bunch of images (ie lighten up the shadows, lens correction). You can also browse the images easily and apply quick edits to this and that parameter. You have presets (saved modifications) and you can copy your edits from one file to an other. If you work in Photoshop and use Bridge, you could compare Lightroom to a Super Bridge with integrated Adobe-RAW-Converter and some other tools.

               

              When you are done with your edits, you simply export your edited files (in a batch or file by file). Predefined and custom defined export presets allow for easy repeated tasks.

               

              The drawback to Lightroom is, that it is a single user tool. You cannot work on a network on one Lightroom database.