9 Replies Latest reply on Aug 9, 2016 7:51 AM by rob day

    image resolution lower than it technically should be

    carlanem Level 1

      PS / ID CC 2014

       

      Hello. I place an image, don't scale it, actual and effective ppi identically 468 (no tranparencies… ), display set to High Quality, High Quality set to maximum in preferences. Screen resolution set to post script (which never seemed to be a problem before, but the "New Documents Preset Resolution" this thread is speaking of has disappeared anyhow). Images displayed at about half resolution or less, and exported accordingly, as can be seen in Acrobat Pro.

       

      Why? What to do?

       

      Thanks.

        • 1. Re: image resolution lower than it technically should be
          memuriko Level 1

          First, you should know DISPLAY QUALITY is only for your Indesign working faster or display better.

          Any resolution file IMPORTed in Indesign will not be changed.

          The only way to control the resolution result (not included the indesign effects like shadow ), is the OUTPUT PANEL.

          If you want to have a high resolution PDF for acrobat, you should edit the PDF output panel.

          • 2. Re: image resolution lower than it technically should be
            Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

            I don't understand where your PostScript comes from.

            If you create a PDF you should NOT do it via Print or PostScript, only via Export, and you should avoid to use EPS or any other kind of PostScript anyway.

            • 3. Re: image resolution lower than it technically should be
              carlanem Level 1

              Hello memuriko, hello Willi, thanks for your replies.

               

              The display quality doesn't determine the output, I know. And you are right, the export resolution settings are what I overlooked, inexcusably and due to fatigue. Your hint here pointed me in the right direction. Many thanks for that.

               

              There does however seem to remain one question, if less important: Why is it that the highest possible InDesign display settings, irrelevant for the outcome as they may be, do not display the full image resolution?

               

              —As for Willi's remark: I was merely referring to InDesign (CC 2014) > Preferences > Units & Increments > Point/Pica Size. The default setting here is: PostScript (72 pts/inch). I'm not sure it's relevant to the matter at hand.—

               

              Thanks again both of you

              • 4. Re: image resolution lower than it technically should be
                John Mensinger Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                carlanem wrote:

                 

                Why is it that the highest possible InDesign display settings, irrelevant for the outcome as they may be, do not display the full image resolution?

                The image displayed in your layouts while in the InDesign editing environment is not your image. It is a dedicated JPEG proxy-copy written by InDesign when your image is Placed. The Display Performance modes are simply to give you image display options with respect to re-draw speed while you work (faster re-draw/lower quality), or perhaps show the work to someone else (slower re-draw, high quality).

                 

                As you've seen, nothing in terms of projected output quality should be judged by the appearance of the proxy image. Actually, considering it's a compressed, screen-resolution JPEG, the High Quality display is quite good in most cases (of course, provided the original image from which it was copied is at least 'quite good').

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: image resolution lower than it technically should be
                  memuriko Level 1

                  DISPLAY QUALITY will control the output result with one condition, which is, your imported IMGs are missed or changed. Then Indesign has no resource to output,  it will use CACHE instead of missed things. Therefor, you will have a good result if you make it HIGH QUALITY.

                   

                  However, any cache is not better than resource file, CTRL+SHIFT+D, check those yellow "!" (need to be refresh) and red "?"(missed), refresh or relink them will solve problem.

                  • 6. Re: image resolution lower than it technically should be
                    Abambo Level 4

                    The only parameter that is important for individual pictures is effective ppi, as this has an impact on your output resolution. Effective ppi should be equal or higher then your target resolution. Standard target resolution for print is 300 dpi, rerely you will need 400 dpi. You will see a quality penalty at resolutions of less then 240 dpi. Target resolution for screen viewing can be much lower.

                    • 7. Re: image resolution lower than it technically should be
                      carlanem Level 1

                      Thanks once more. Linked images shouldn't be missing when going to offset I suppose. I wouldn't have it. And yes, the effective ppi is what I considered the one relevant ppi; hence my putting it in the initial post. Now the fact “[t]he image displayed in your layouts while in the InDesign editing environment is not your image. It is a dedicated JPEG proxy-copy written by InDesign” is really interesting and solves the remaining riddle. Never heard of it before, so I've learned something. Thanks again all of you.

                      • 9. Re: image resolution lower than it technically should be
                        rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        Screen resolution set to post script (which never seemed to be a problem before, but the "New Documents Preset Resolution" this thread is speaking of has disappeared anyhow)

                         

                        The thread you have linked to is in the Photoshop forum and the preferences screen captures are from Photoshop not InDesign. Photoshop documents have a user defined output resolution, so the preference is for the initial Photoshop document setup. InDesign pages have no resolution (but can contain image objects of various output resolutions), so its never had a document resolution preference.

                         

                        There was a change in how zooming is defined with InDesign CS6, but that has no affect on output or export resolution.