12 Replies Latest reply on Aug 21, 2016 2:13 AM by john beardsworth

    STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import

    jay anneb97695892

      I'm using iMac OS X El Capitan Version 10:11:6, and working in Lightroom CC.  I shoot time-lapse video on NIKON D500, in RAW, and when I connect the camera to my iMac to import the video files, the video file converts to .mov files and that's it.  I want to edit using Lightroom and LRTimelapse 4 Pro, and I need the raw file as shot, NOT a conversion. I can't figure out how to fix this.  I'm thinking I should be able to disable the automatic import on my iMac, and then load the raw video files directly into LRTimelapse.  However, I can't a way to disable the auto import on my iMac.  Can anyone enlighten me here?  I'm going around in circles and it's getting very frustrating! Thanks! 

        • 1. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
          JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          There isn't a raw movie format as far as I understand. If you are shooting in movie mode then the MOV file is what you get. Lightroom isn't doing any conversion when the files are imported.

          • 2. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
            john beardsworth Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Are you sure that it's not the camera that is making the MOV files? On my Nikon D800, that's what the timelapse video feature does. If I wanted to create the timelapse in Lightroom from raw files, I'd use the camera's interval timer. Sorry if this question seems obvious.

             

            Jim, read Video Workflow: Using RAW Files. It's not something I've looked into myself, and the terms may be slightly different from still photography but I believe raw video is possible.

            • 3. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
              JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Yeah, I figured there would be something like that available after I made the comment. I'm still just using a D7100. And I'm not following the technology very closely on the newer cameras. Thanks for pointing that out to me.

              • 4. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
                Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                As others have said, your camera produces a mov file when you do the time-lapse. You need to use its built in interval timer to generate raw images. Then you do NOT want to use LR time-lapse. Since you have CC, you have Photoshop too. That can do far higher quality and better timelapses than the slideshow trick. You can even do pan and zooms very easily and add soundtracks. Here is a quick tutorial on how that works: Assembling a time lapse | Photoshop | lynda.com - YouTube . The only thing you want to do different from that video is to export to H264 instead of quicktime uncompressed as they do which generates gigantic files. Basically you want to export a folder of sequentially numbered jpegs or tifs from your raws from Lightroom and have Photoshop turn that into a time-lapse video.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
                  john beardsworth Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  I wouldn't be at all surprised if your D7100 could record raw video, if it records video. From the little I understand, you'd have to tether to some kind of external drive, and you'd need to convert the LV Raw with a special codec. But I understand very little about this area.

                  • 6. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
                    Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    Indeed if you want to do raw video with a dale you generally hook it up through hdmi to a specialized recorder that can write video in an lossless compressed format. I don't believe this camera has 4:4:4 hdmi video output so it is not super raw what you would get. It also doesn't support log gamma which is what pros would want to use.

                    • 7. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
                      jay anneb97695892 Level 1

                      Thank you, Jao!  You are 100% correct.  I'm learning backwards! I was able to create a time lapse video successfully, but then I realized how very little I know about what I am doing. Lol, I've basically been shooting in automatic, how embarrassing...however, with that said, at least I understand now and I've learned a lot! I can't begin to thank you enough for this lesson!

                      • 8. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
                        Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        Happy to help. We've all had to learn. You probably got a lot of flickering if you use automatic mode. That is usually not the right choice indeed. Another issue can be autofocus being on which can lead to the image "breathing". I am sure you will figure it out over time. Happy time lapsing!

                        • 9. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
                          jay anneb97695892 Level 1

                          I actually got some pretty good stuff in Aperture priority, with locked focus. I knew something, just not enough! Daytime was easy and turned out great. I've been trying to capture Sunrise with a well lit subject in the foreground. Nothing could be more difficult! I thought I would try editing to fix it. When I said automatic I just meant that I was using the simplest way to create, (there's no Auto Mode on the D500), I was referring to using the Time Lapse Setting. Anyway, I feel educated now so I'm anxious to try it! Thank you again!

                           

                          Sent from my iPhone

                          • 10. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
                            Conrad C Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                            jay anneb97695892 wrote:

                             

                            I actually got some pretty good stuff in Aperture priority, with locked focus. I knew something, just not enough! Daytime was easy and turned out great. I've been trying to capture Sunrise with a well lit subject in the foreground. Nothing could be more difficult! I thought I would try editing to fix it. When I said automatic I just meant that I was using the simplest way to create, (there's no Auto Mode on the D500), I was referring to using the Time Lapse Setting. Anyway, I feel educated now so I'm anxious to try it!

                            I use LRTimelapse, and basically you have two choices here:

                            • The Time Lapse Movie setting for your D500 will create a finished whole time lapse in camera. This is the easiest way to create a time lapse, especially if the camera is good at smoothing out exposure changes. But if you use this option, there is very little Lightroom can do, and nothing LRTimelapse can do, to alter that time lapse because the movie is already finished.
                            • The Interval setting for your D500 can record full size raw still frames, instead of compressed video frames. You can load those into LRTimelapse for editing and management in Lightroom. LRTimelapse is brilliant software, and it lets you apply the full power of Lightroom raw-level edits to a time lapse sequence. It works best if you're already experienced with Lightroom raw processing and Library features. If you use this method, I strongly encourage you to carefully review the tutorials on the LRTimelapse site because the steps need to be followed very closely. If you do that, you can be rewarded with some smooth, spectacular results and much more flexibility than if you did it all in camera. (For example, the ability to add Lightroom noise reduction and local adjustments, or pan a 2K or 4K crop across the entire raw frame.) I'm an experienced Lightroom user and it still took me a while to learn the ins and outs of LRTimelapse, but if you need the power and options LRTimelapse is well worth learning.

                             

                            If you're just getting started with time lapse, the best thing to do is to use the in-camera Time Lapse Movie setting for a while. See how much you like it, and make a list of things you wish you could alter. Then start practicing with the Interval setting, loading raw frames into Lightroom and LRTimelapse, and making edits to your sequence before generating the finished movie. Just be aware that generating LRTimelapse previews and the final movie can take a lot of processing power, disk space, and time.

                            • 11. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
                              jay anneb97695892 Level 1

                              Conrad,

                              Thanks so much, what an excellent explanation!

                              I'm thrilled to say that I totally agree and this describes my path perfectly. Thank goodness,

                              since I have already invested in LRTimelapse 4 Pro!

                              I'm shooting as I write this and made a mistake

                              with the interval settings, but that's okay, it will

                              help me figure out the math and give me something to practice with in LR and LRTimelapse...thankfully, my iMac is a beast so processing is fast. Something

                              else I invested in wisely...yay! I've found Gunther's

                              You Tube tutorials...and as you suggest, I'll take it step by step. Hopefully, I won't have to write to him for help, which I'm certain he will appreciate, ha!

                              Thank you, again!

                               

                               

                              Sent from my iPhone

                              • 12. Re: STOP iMac conversion of RAW video files at import
                                john beardsworth Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                Conrad C wrote:

                                 

                                • If you do that, you can be rewarded with some smooth, spectacular results and much more flexibility than if you did it all in camera. (For example, the ability to add Lightroom noise reduction and local adjustments, or pan a 2K or 4K crop across the entire raw frame.)

                                Another example - correcting any dust spots! I have figured out a few ways to fix dust spots on movie files, but none are as good or pleasant as syncing spot corrections across hundreds or thousands of still images..