16 Replies Latest reply on Sep 6, 2016 10:13 PM by Rick Gerard

    How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?

    UnderSeaNovelty

      So im trying to really focus down on my editing and getting it to look professional. I know Haedox uses adobe premire pro. I have it as well. And i know this is probably really simple but how does one get this poppy effect with images/text. Or really smooth transitional wipes

      Heres a video with time stamps for the style im referencing

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5i0RWnG_GAk (0:00 to 0:07 Poppy/images text. 0:37 to 0:42 More poppy images and transition 0:58 to 1:00 nice image transition 1:16 to 1:20 that transition again)

      I feel like it might be a preset or something? Idk but it would be much obliged if anyone could point me in the right direction

        • 1. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
          Peru Bob Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          If you are referring to the rebounding of the images, that could be a wiggle effect in AfterEffects.

          • 3. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
            UnderSeaNovelty Level 1

            Okay after search forever i found the bounce! Its actually a AE expression called inertial bounce

             

            So half of my search is over. Now how does one get that smooth transition?

             

            [Asking in the correct forum helps... Moved from non-technical Forum Lounge to After Effects forum... Mod]

            • 4. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
              Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional

              So half of my search is over. Now how does one get that smooth transition?

              what exactly are you referring to as a smooth transition?

              • 5. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                There are expressions that will help with springy actions and help you automate the process, but great animation requires practice and skill. No plug-in or script will automatically give you perfect timing and placement.

                 

                For example, and I don't want to get too complicated here because you are probably family new to After Effects and expressions, but here's what one of my 200 plus animation priest the I use to speed up my work looks like. This preset causes a layer to fly in from the left then bounce to a stop, then just before the layer ends it falls off the bottom of the screen. It looks like this:

                sif = effect("slideIn Frames")("Slider");

                sof= effect("slideOut Frames")("Slider");

                // find in and out point

                inTime = sif * thisComp.frameDuration;

                  if (effect("Match SI SO")("Checkbox") == 0) {

                  outTime = sof * thisComp.frameDuration;

                  }

                  else if (effect("Match SI SO")("Checkbox") == 1) {

                  outTime = inTime;

                  }

                // Fix  layer size when scaled

                sf = scale - [100, 100];

                xSize = width + (width * sf[0]/100);

                ySize = height + (height * sf[1]/100);

                realSize = [xSize, ySize];

                // Set Positions

                spx = 0 - realSize[0] + realSize[0]/2 ;

                rstx = value [0];

                rsty = value[1];

                epy = thisComp.height + realSize[1] - realSize[1]/2;

                // create movement

                freq = effect("bounce Frequency")("Slider");

                        amplitude = effect("bounce Amplitude")("Slider");

                        decay = effect("bounce Decay")("Slider");

                    posCos = Math.abs(Math.cos(freq*time*2*Math.PI));

                  nt = time-inPoint;

                    y = amplitude*posCos/Math.exp(decay*nt);

                moveIn = Math.min(linear(time,inPoint,inPoint + inTime,spx  ,rstx-y));

                moveOut = Math.min(easeIn(time,outPoint - outTime,outPoint - thisComp.frameDuration,rsty ,epy));

                [moveIn, moveOut]

                 

                This is how the preset and the expression works:

                There are Effects Control Sliders and check boxes added to the layer to control the number of slide in frames, slide out frames, match the number of slide in frames to the number of slide out frames (check box) and for use layer in the expression sliders for frequency, amplitude and decay of the bounce. The first two lines in the expression just point to the slide in and slide out frame values taken from the sliders.

                 

                The next section of the expression looks first for the checkbox that matches the slide in and slide out frames for the movement. It then sets the point in time when the layer should start moving out of the frame.

                 

                The next section calculates the actual size of the layer in pixels based on the scale and the layer size. This value is important so that the initial position of the layer puts the layer just off the left edge of the frame.

                 

                The next section uses the real size of the layer to set the starting position of the layer. The last section adds in the movement. First the x position is set, then the layer moves in to it's resting position along the x axis, then, based on the speed, amplitude frequency and decay are applied to the layer to make it bounce. When the time matches the out point of the layer minus the slide out frames the layer falls out of the frame until it just clears the edge of the frame.

                 

                To use this animation preset all you do is position and scale your layer exactly where you want it in the frame, set the in and out point, then apply the animation preset. If you want more or less bounce or different timing then you adjust the sliders. This makes the animation much faster to set up and is much easier to do than it would be if you added keyframes and manually edited the speed graphs or interpolation of the keyframes. So now it's pretty easy to get a good move, but it still takes skill and experience to work out the timing so that the animation is the most effective works well with the audio and the other elements in the frame.

                 

                Please enjoy this preset. Dropbox - flyInBounceDropOut.ffx It's is one of about 150 of these that I hope to have on the market soon.

                 

                To learn more about creating bounces, springs and other moves check out my friend Dan Ebbert's motion script site. He is one of the best expressions and scripting guys on the planed. Here's his page on bounce and overshoot.

                • 6. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                  UnderSeaNovelty Level 1

                  https://giphy.com/gifs/3mbdjjyH88Xde

                   

                  This one. its not a jagged stop or anything. Its just smooth

                   

                  Heres the transition in the actual video since giphy can only put out the quality so well apparently

                   

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5i0RWnG_GAkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=5i0RWnG_GAk#t=78

                  • 7. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                    Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional

                    This one. its not a jagged stop or anything. Its just smooth

                    well, looks like a simple ease to the keyframes. you set a keyframe at the starting position, you advance a few frames, you set a keyframe for the ending position. now you select both of them and click F9 shortcut key to make an easy ease interpolation between them. this means the movement will start at 0% speed, advance to 100% speed and end at 0% speed.

                     

                    you really need to read this:

                    Apply and control speed changes in After Effects

                    Keyframe interpolation in After Effects

                     

                    here are some fine tutorials about interpolation of keyframes:

                    Greyscalegorilla Blog | Guide to Keyframes in After Effects

                    All About Keyframes & The Graph Editor - An Adobe After Effects Tutorial - YouTube

                    • 8. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                      UnderSeaNovelty Level 1

                      Thank you so very much! I was able to mess around and get both the bounce and the transition! You all have been great and i appreciate it so much. Im so ecstatic you dont even know! If i might ask 2 last questions, Once the video is overlayed over his background it has a shadow. Would that be under the masking properties?

                       

                      And secondly whats the ideal way to have the videos that are overlayed like that aligned and not too squashed or stretched. Whats the general rule of thumb in this case? As of course when you insert a clip it goes over the whole composition. At least in my bit of messing around with AE. I suppose these last two questions are more do's and don't's when it comes to this type of "style"

                       

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=5i0RWnG_GAk#t=88

                      • 9. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                        Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional
                        Once the video is overlayed over his background it has a shadow. Would that be under the masking properties?

                        you can add a shadow as an effect. it's called drop shadow.

                         

                        And secondly whats the ideal way to have the videos that are overlayed like that aligned and not too squashed or stretched. Whats the general rule of thumb in this case?

                        you should not stretch your videos. i.e if you touch the scale, don't break the chain of X an Y. you should scale it proportionally. if you have to change the proportions, do it with a mask and it's probably better to mask some of the video than stretching it and deforming it. but this really depends what we are exactly talking about. if you could show and example, it would be helpful to give you appropriate advice.

                        • 10. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                          Gutter-Fish Level 4

                          This is a great plug in with a lifetime license for $35 that, among many other things, makes the elastic bounce in/out effect very easy.

                          All you do adjust the overshoot, gravity, etc.  Well worth the $35 in my opinion.

                          Motion v2 — Mt. Mograph

                          • 11. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                            UnderSeaNovelty Level 1

                            Oh my goodness you weren't wrong. I added that asap. I am a sucker for efficiency! Thank you c:

                            • 12. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                              UnderSeaNovelty Level 1

                              My only example really is how these two clips keep the same aspect ratio. They never look off and have consistency (even the images in between) https://giphy.com/gifs/yA5UlGwJFyr2U

                               

                              That's what im looking to "mirror"

                              • 13. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                                Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                My only example really is how these two clips keep the same aspect ratio. They never look off and have consistency (even the images in between) https://giphy.com/gifs/yA5UlGwJFyr2U

                                 

                                That's what im looking to "mirror"

                                This requires planning and practice. Animation is tough business. There are tools, some of which you have discovered, but really good work depends on understanding how the eye moves across an image, how the brain reacts to sound and picture and how composition, color, contrast and light influence our perception of the make believe world we create when we animate or edit movies. I study every film, commercial or animation that really catches me to figure out why they work better than most sequences. It takes a while. Very few of us are good at it right away. Sometimes you need to lead the beat by a few frames to make things look in sync, sometimes you need to be behind the beat. Sometimes you need to cut before the blink of an eye, sometimes you cut on the blink or right after. It all depends on the shot. No one rule works every time in every situation.

                                 

                                The animation you are seeking to mirror does not match image size it just matches timing and everything is constrained to the center of the frame as it's resting or HERO position. All of the moves take about the same amount of time and have about the same easing applied. Warning, here comes my editorial comments: I wold not call your sample a great example of image animation, it is just evenly timed information moving in front of my eyes. Each move is predictable, adds little to telling the story and could be done easily with a preset or canned move.

                                • 14. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                                  UnderSeaNovelty Level 1

                                  That is very much true. I mean, I am coming off of the old Sony Vegas Pro days where I didn't do much other than bad panning. Finally using things like Premiere and After Effects is an upgrade for me. While it isn't a great example of image animation, it is a "bar" of sorts or a new standard that I am setting for myself. "Everyone has to start somewhere," as they say. In terms of skill, when the content you used to put out wasn't a notch up from Windows Movie Maker where everything had default transitions with Linkin Park songs playing in the background, it's exciting to learn professionalism.

                                   

                                  My green thumb is definitely showing, but I'm glad to take this passion seriously now. Hell, I'd like to actually develop down the motion graphic and VFX tree as I continue down this path. Although, I have to be honest, as seeing how much of the bulk of what I'm trying to do is in After Effects... what is the point of using Premiere? I know I can use them interchangeably with dynamic linking, but really Premiere is just seeming like a middle man at this point.

                                  • 15. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                                    Gutter-Fish Level 4

                                    You're welcome.

                                     

                                    To me Motion is the most valuable plug-in I own.  The keyframe sliders alone are worth the price to me.  The Excite, Jump, Clone, Name, Null & Rope tools I also use all the time.   It also has a bit of sort of hidden functionality..definitely watch the explainer video to catch it all.   I hope you get as much use out of it as I do.

                                    • 16. Re: How does one achieve that smooth but poppy editing style?
                                      Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                      AE is for creating shots that you cannot do in Premiere Pro. Simple as that. AE is not for editing. 90% of my AE comps are under 7 seconds because the average shot in a movie that I work on is under seven seconds. Even when I do dynamic text animations (lyrics videos) or animated slide shows the comps are broken up into single sentences or a single musical phrase because it's so much easier to 1, make changes when the client says can you do this instead of that, and 2, fine tune the edit so that it really works with the audio.

                                       

                                      Here's the normal workflow for most projects that I proud. Script, story board and shot list, production, rough edit and conform the sound if shot double system, EQ and normalize the audio tracks using Dynamic Link from Premiere Pro to Audition so theres less monkeying with sound in the edit, first color grade via an adjustment layer in Premiere Pro using Lumetri, first cut. and scratch music mix in Premiere Pro, any shots that need effects are sent to After Effects by dynamic link only if the effects are very simple and the shot is short or by sending the original footage to AE via copy and paste, then adding a few frames to the head and tail as handles, then the effects are added, sent out for approval, and a DI (digital intermediate) is rendered using a suitable 10 bit or better production codec, then the final polish of the edit in Premiere Pro, then a final sound mix and audio track in Audition, then the final color grade and archival master rendered. Even with all of these steps, for almost any film longer than 5 minutes, you'll get a better product and spend less time than if you tried to do your entire 5 minute film in AE. The only way anyone can make a decent living playing with pixels is to turn out a better product in less time and the only way you can do that is to use all the tools available to make your work easier and more efficient.