10 Replies Latest reply on Sep 6, 2016 11:58 AM by Roei Tzoref
      • 1. Re: 2d morphing animation
        Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional

        it's called traditional animation. also Cell animation. Traditional animation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia this means a very cool guy (or girl) sits and draws every single frame and colors it, then films/scans the frame one by one. while there are ways to digitize some of this, most of it is painstakingly manual labor that not so many users posses the patience and skill to go through with it all the way. 

        • 2. Re: 2d morphing animation
          kennethm815406 Level 1

          Thank you for this information.

          There is no way I can make such using after effects?

          • 3. Re: 2d morphing animation
            Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional

            Nope. maybe this could clear things out: The 5 Types of Animation - YouTube

            • 4. Re: 2d morphing animation
              kennethm815406 Level 1

              thank you

              • 5. Re: 2d morphing animation
                Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                You can certainly use After Effects to assemble that type of animation and you can also use AE to help you with the movement in the scene, but there is no plug-in or effect that you can apply to recreate that kind of animation automatically. That type of animation requires a high degree of drawing skill and a lot of practice.

                 

                Here's a great free tool that helps with rigging. Duik – Rainbox

                 

                2009 Academy Award - best animated short - created in After Effects:

                There are other tools that may be better suited to your project. It just depends on the style and your experience level.

                • 6. Re: 2d morphing animation
                  Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional

                  "assemble" and "create" are entirely 2 different things. the film you are describing was not "Created" in after effects and that statement would be misleading Op. the images here were hand dawn frame by frame and then assembled in Ps (probably colored there in an animation timeline) and probably composited in Ae. this means 90% of the work is manual labor frame by frame and no script would help here. the answer is that for this type of animation you have to go old school and draw it and there is no script that could help you go anywhere near what Op is referring to. Animation - Traditional Animation Demo - YouTube

                  • 7. Re: 2d morphing animation
                    Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    According to an article published at the time by the creators and Adobe the film was created primarily in After Effects using Hand Drawn art... Do your research...

                     

                    There are several animated films in the last few years that primarily use After Effects to do the animating.

                    • 8. Re: 2d morphing animation
                      Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional

                      Oh Rick I admire your spirit. you never run out of things to say, but unfortunately you also have a talent for going off topic and ignoring facts and spending a great amount of time arguing about nothing. unfortunate for me that I am compelled to answer

                       

                      According to an article published at the time by the creators and Adobe the film was created primarily in After Effects using Hand Drawn art... Do your research...

                      Please share the article if you can find it. this is my research. from the article: "All of the artwork, including the backgrounds, is hand-drawn, and the animation was assembled very simply, using Photoshop and After Effects." let's break it down shall we? the animation was assembled means the animation is there, it is assembled in Photoshop (probably for color) and in After effects (probably for composition purposes). not Created in After Effects.

                       

                      THE FACT is in this type of animation like "The House of Small Cubes", images are not created in after effects and most of them are even not animated in after effects. you can clearly see in this film that the animation part here is not character rigging, not face movement, not walk cycles, but only navigating in the scene and maybe a bit more, maybe adding some type of Vfx and atmosphere look and that's about it. the core of the animation, the most of the animation, almost all of the animation is done manually frame by frame. The animation process contains many stages as I am sure you know (maybe Op does not) and yes some of the work may be done in Ae. but to have a hand drawn animation you have to draw. frame by frame. either digitally or manually on paper. this will be most of the work.

                       

                      There are several animated films in the last few years that primarily use After Effects to do the animating.

                      I am even not sure what point are you trying to prove here. that animation can be done in Ae? does this really relate to what Op is showing us? have you noticed the headline that reads "2d morphing animation"? Of course there are animated films using after effects. even entirely in after effects. but these are apples and we're talking oranges. the animation in the "The House of Small Cubes" is very different from what Op is showing and still, like I said: 90% frame by frame drawing, and the rest is in PS or AE. I had the privilege of animating and compositing in Waltz with Bashir. an even more digitized production and appearance than "The House of Small Cubes", few years of production time that I was contributing in the final stages of assembly, compositing and animation. even if a lot was done in After effects, it was not "Created" in after effects. the backgrounds were hand drawn, they were painted in photoshop, the figures were rotoscoped in Flash and then refined frame by frame and the animation was hand drawn frame by frame in Flash. some animation was done in After Effects and of course the compositing as well. you can say it's 50% After effects. and this is a really extreme example of a heavily VFX type of animation feature. no way near what we see here.

                       

                      bottom line: all of these type of animations are very different from the morphing ingenious work of Gerald Scarfe that is shown here. the title of the post is "2d morphing animation". psychedelic morphing of this kind is 99% frame by frame and there is no other way to say it. you have to do this: Animation - Traditional Animation Demo - YouTube

                      • 9. Re: 2d morphing animation
                        Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        I never said you could easily draw this in AE. I said that it takes talent and skill, but you absolutely would not be required to draw every frame by hand to recreate this animation.

                        Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 8.25.44 AM.png

                        The question was Can you do 2D morphing animations in AE - I can. I have done hundreds of them. I could bend the stems, wiggle the leaves, and given a few appropriate master frames of the parts of the flower, I could even open the flowers up, it would just take more than one layer and some carefully prepared artwork. I would not have to draw every frame of the sample animation in Photoshop or with a paint brush.

                         

                        When I had animated the shots I would not assemble them in AE I would edit the project in Premiere Pro.

                         

                        I just posted the award winning animation as a sample of what can be done mostly in AE according to the folks that did the film. Maybe it will give someone ideas and inspiration for their project.

                         

                        I'm so glad you know more than I do and that you are so much smarter and give so much better answers than I do. I'm so glad that you have taken the time to carefully analyze my post and point out it's inadequacies and it's lack of relevance for most of the folks that read the forum. I hope to learn more from you in the future and i humbly accept your criticism and acknowledge my lack of understanding of a job that I have been doing for more than 40 years using everything from motion control cameras that I designed and built to animation cells and ink and paint that I filmed on an Oxberry animation stand.

                        • 10. Re: 2d morphing animation
                          Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional
                          It's easy to be critical. I'm so sorry that I have offended you and that you feel the need to call me foolish and tell everyone that my post is irrelevant to the topic at hand.

                          I don't know Rick. if I am critical what does that make you? nobody called you foolish, just in this case if I had to pick a word it would be "redundant". I take no offense rest assured, this is not my work or reputation (or yours) that are brought into question.

                           

                          I never said anything about exactly recreating this animation. I just said you can do morphing animations in AE..

                          nobody said that you did. nobody claimed morphing animations cannot be done in Ae. only this type of animation cannot be executed in Ae (keeping it's style of course)

                           

                          each flower is a drawing - I said it requires skill, but the animation of the parts of the flowers could certainly be done in AE so you would not have to draw every frame by hand. I've done the same.

                          what you have just said here can only be judged on its own merits and not a statement.

                           

                          Can you do 2D morphing animations in AE - I can. I have done hundreds of them. I could bend the stems, wiggle the leaves, and given a few appropriate master frames of the parts of the flower, I could even open the flowers up, it would just take more than one layer and some carefully prepared artwork. I would not have to draw every frame of the sample animation in Photoshop or with a paint brush.

                          You can certainly try to replicate Op's reference in Ae. I would not bet on you succeeding though. my bet is that this would not come even close.

                           

                          I'm so glad you know more than I do. I hope to learn more from you in the future and i humbly accept your criticism and acknowledge my lack of understanding of a job that I have been doing for more than 40 years using everything from motion control cameras to animation cells and ink and paint.

                          Finally some real attempt at humor from you! even if it is painfully cynical. tell you what Rick, why don't you just ask Adobe to put by your name your numerous years of experience, credentials and awards and this way you won't have to write them each and every week? this could save you a great deal of time. here's a little tribute from me:

                          badge.gif

                          Let me say this again to you, as I said numerous times in spite our many disagreements and my feeble attempts at humor: I respect you and your experience is respected. I consider you one of the top Ae's gurus in the field. but as for your demeanor... well... guess this our community's cross to bear. maybe you have learned something new today, maybe even from me. I can't really tell. you claim you are a perpetual student but it seems to me you are more keen on being a perpetual teacher. I haven't been here for very long, but it seems to me you never acknowledge your mistakes of even an insight. never say "thanks" or even a simple "huh, did not notice that" and certainly not saying "learned something today!". maybe you refuse to acknowledge this, but like all of the users here, novice and veterans, ,my guess is that you are still learning (After Effects, yes!) and you will always do, you certainly don't know everything and you certainly haven't done everything, and I would be so bold to say that you certainly don't have all the answers. this post is only one case of a few where you misfire. I could show you another.

                           

                          this is my claim: this type of work cannot and should not be done in Ae. period. even the "use a drill to hammer a nail" metaphor won't apply here. maybe a "a fist to hammer a nail" really. if you want to tell Op otherwise, you should back you words with visuals and not empty statements, and, while respected, in this case really irrelevant, credentials.

                           

                          My humble apologies if you have taken offence. I have enjoyed you and still do (I can only hope you feel the same) but alas this is taking a great deal of my time and causing issues with my girlfriend across the screen making sad faces at me: "what are you doing there for so long!"