7 Replies Latest reply on Sep 14, 2016 6:33 AM by Rick Gerard

    Resize image sources - changing base size of images

    aar gambit sp z.14438715 Level 1

      Hi all

      I have some trivial problem but i cant deal with it. I have some project with compositions called slides. Each slide have JPG image as layer and this image has assigned resize effect from 100% to 106% (two keyframes). Images have their own folder. I have to replace all images but problem is that new images have different sizes, mostly they are bigger than originals. When i rightclick directly on imported images i dont see any options to change their size (only Placeholder or Solid). When i double click them to open in new tab i also dont see any tools to resizing and Layer menu is mostly greyed.

      So, so far I found that i have three possibilities:

      1.Resize them as a layer in each Slider composition. Unfortuately i cant see any way to change base size, so resizing here means adding another keyframe or changing existing one. If i change first keyframe of layer in slide composition then i have to proportionally resize the last one. There are about 20 slides so this process would be quite painfull

      2. Resize images before importing - with PSP,GIMP or even IrfanView. This would be far better solution than one before however this means blind resizing - without any preview as whole composition. Each time i would want change size a little bit i would have to import image again. Painfull.

      3. Convert images to compositions,

      Convert each JPG file to composition, put this composition as layer to each slide composition next to JPG layer, copy transformation effects from JPG layer to image composition layer and delete JPG layer. Long process but effect is exaclty as I want and project is quite futureproof for any other image changes. However in bigger projects where there are many effects assigned to layers it would be quite painful.

       

      So is there an easy way to change base sizes of imported pictures? I just cant believe that in such a huge program like After Effects there would be no way for such a simple task. I strongly believe im just missing something.

        • 1. Re: Resize image sources - changing base size of images
          Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional
          So is there an easy way to change base sizes of imported pictures? I just cant believe that in such a huge program like After Effects there would be no way for such a simple task. I strongly believe im just missing something.

          you should prepare your images before you import them to Ae. see here: Preparing and importing still images in After Effects

           

          i rightclick directly on imported images i dont see any options to change their size

          Yep there isn't any. these are source files and if you want to change their size prior to placing them in your timeline, you can do it in the source software like Ps if it's still images, Ai if it's vector graphics and if it's video you do that in Ae.

           

          so resizing here means adding another keyframe or changing existing one.

          you can resize your layers in Ae with Scale parameter. (transform->scale). if there is no animation, you don't need to place a keyframe. for example you can resize your layer to 46% and decide you want to have it scale for a while so the first keyframe will be 46% and the last keyframe will be 83%.

           

          Resize images before importing - with PSP,GIMP or even IrfanView. This would be far better solution than one before however this means blind resizing

          why blind? if it's a still image you can work in an HD preset in Ps and see exactly how you want to place your image. if you see that you plan to make it larger in Ae, you should make it larger. you should bring your raster layer as large as you need them to be. not more and not less. this would save you processing time (if it's too large - it calculates more information), and softening the pixels (if you enlarge more than 100%, you are degrading the image)

           

          Hope this is clear enough. if you have more specific questions, ask away. (read the link first please)

          • 2. Re: Resize image sources - changing base size of images
            aar gambit sp z.14438715 Level 1
            you can resize your layers in Ae with Scale parameter. (transform->scale). if there is no animation, you don't need to place a keyframe. for example you can resize your layer to 46% and decide you want to have it scale for a while so the first keyframe will be 46% and the last keyframe will be 83%.

            Yes, i know that if you have layer with no keyframe of scale property then scaling means changing its base size. However in my example I have two frames - 100% and 106%. If i import big image then i have to resize it. If im on first keyframe then it wil change its size from 100% to for example 56%. But tle last keyframe is not changed - its still 106%. So it means animation goes from 56% to 106% - image grows much faster than in original animation.

             

            But now i found that i can select all Keyframe points by clicking whole Scale property and when i resize image, all keyframe points are resizing proportionally. This is the simplest and most effective solution for me!

             

            Thanks for help!

            • 3. Re: Resize image sources - changing base size of images
              Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional

              Good job. Another way is to add the transform effect and change the scale. now you don't need to touch the keyframes.

              • 4. Re: Resize image sources - changing base size of images
                aar gambit sp z.14438715 Level 1

                When i click right on layer  and go to Effects i dont see any Transform effect.

                • 5. Re: Resize image sources - changing base size of images
                  Roei Tzoref Adobe Community Professional

                  it is under the distort category. you are better off using the effects & presets panel to search effect. you can type transform.

                  • 6. Re: Resize image sources - changing base size of images
                    kalibahlu Level 1

                    A couple other options would be to either put your JPGs into precomps and scale them to your base scale there, or scale to your base size in your main comp, then attach to a null that animates from 100% to 106%. Or instead of a null, apply Detail Preserving Upscale to add your 100% to 106% keyframes.

                    • 7. Re: Resize image sources - changing base size of images
                      Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      If I understand your problem correctly you have a template that you like that uses images and you want to replace the original images with some new ones. The problem that you are having is that the replaced images are not always the same size as the original images. It look like you have found a solution that works by doing this inside After Effects. This will not be the best or most efficient workflow for all projects. The best workflow involves preparation of your replacement images so they are optimized for the template. To do that you should be examining the template and setting up some parameters and writing them down, then applying those parameters to the images before you even open After Effects.

                       

                      Let me give you an example. I have a couple of templates that I have made for some of my clients that want to build the same kind of animated slide show very quickly. These templates utilize both horizontal and vertical images and the hero position for each image is automatically determined by an expression that checks the height and width of the layer and adjusts the position and scale so that portrait images fit the frame as well as landscape images. The "here" position is the part of the timeline when the image should look it's best. Without doing any preparation to the images I could add any image from 100 X 500 pixels to 20,000 X 10,000 pixels and the framing would be correct in the project. This is essentially what you are doing when you are scaling your images using your working technique. If your images are close to the same size as the originals this is probably OK but the more efficient way to do this by far, and the technique that will give you the best results in the long run is to set up a batch action in Photoshop or Light Room that prepares your images for video and makes any adjustments necessary to the images to improve the way then look when rendered.

                       

                      Here's some quick general guidelines for preparing images for video.

                      1. If your images are going to be 2D layers they should be sized so that they are somewhere close to 100% scale when it is in the "hero" position
                      2. If you images are going to be 3D layers they should be sized so that they are somewhere close to 100% scale and at a distance from the camera that is equal to the zoom value of the lens when the layer is in the "hero" position
                      3. Images prepared for video should be optimized for video depending on the level of detail in the image

                       

                      Let me talk for a moment For example an portrait of a person shot on a Canon 5DS will be 50 MP and about 8,800 pixels wide. If the template is using images with a width of 2000 pixels then to make the replacement image fit you'll need to scale the replacement image down to about 22% to make it work in the template. This means two things. The first is that AE is going to have to process almost 16 times the number of pixels when rendering the project so the render times are going to dramatically increase. Second, and most importantly, the original pixels, the original detail in the image is going to be interpolated. If your images contain lots of detail like shingles on the roof of a house you risk introducing moray effects into the video where colors dance. To properly prepare an image like that for video you will get a better result if you actually soften the image a bit and reduce the detail in Photoshop after it is resized before you use it in video production. On the other hand, let's say you have a beautiful image of a young actor that was shot with a pro-mist filter to give the face a nice glow. Reduce that image by 22% in Photoshop and you may need to significantly increase the detail level in the image to bring out the actors eyes in the video. These are all creative decisions that you should be making when you prepare images for video.

                       

                      It is easy to set up a batch process in Photoshop that resizes images based on either height or width and then pauses so you can take a look at something like the detail or vibrance settings of the image, and then move on. One of the templates that I have for one of my clients is designed for standard HD output and it moves in on the images so that the hero position is showing about 40% of he frame. My batch export settings resize all of the original images to 2600 pixels wide and gives me the opportunity to adjust the vibrance and clarity of the images. I can run through 50 images in about 10 minutes then, because they are renamed by the batch process, just drop them in the folder that the template looks for, open the AET(After Effects Template) file and press render.

                       

                      I hope this helps. Properly preparing your images for video is part of being a professional and it will save you time in the long run. I do this with every photograph I plan on using in a video production whether they are being added to a template or not.