5 Replies Latest reply on Nov 15, 2016 2:22 AM by RjL190365

    Intel i5-6500: What a great little CPU! (If you can't afford an i7, that is.)

    RjL190365 Level 4

      This past August I upgraded the CPU in my tiny breadbox mini-ITX PC from an i3-6100 (which was a great CPU for having only two physical cores) to an i5-6500. I had stated back then that the i5 wasn't worth the extra cost based solely on the PPBM10 RPI score.

       

      But now that I did some testing with a real-life Premiere Pro CC 2015.3 project, and I can now say that it was worth the extra $70. My real-life Cineform-to-H.264 Blu-ray export (from a full HD timeline) took just over the project's real time (about 40 minutes) with the i5, while the same PC with the i3 needed nearly 1 hour 5 minutes to perform that exact same export.

       

      Thus, I am now recommending the i5-6500 (and not the i3-6100) as the minimum CPU for most HD video editing, especially if one is planning to use a higher-end GPU such as a GeForce GTX 1060 for MPE GPU acceleration.

       

      Do you agree?

        • 1. Re: Intel i5-6500: What a great little CPU! (If you can't afford an i7, that is.)
          JEShort01 Level 4

          Randall,

           

          You asked, and I for one do disagree.

           

          The i5-6500 is only $110 less than the i7-6700, which has more than twice the firepower and does so with the same TDP (thermal design power envelope) as the i5-6500. And, I would contend that $110 is not that significant a number in the overall cost of running Premiere Pro be it for a business or for a hobby. (considering cameras, PCs, license subscription, etc.) Put another way, if you can afford Premiere Pro, then you should be able to afford an i7 -- or better .

           

          Specs for i5-6500

          4 cores

          slowest speed (all cores) = 3.2 GHz

          highest turbo speed = 3.6 GHz

          TDP = 65w (same)

          cost $192

           

          Specs for i7-6700

          8 cores (supports Hyperthreads)

          slowest speed (all cores) = 3.4 GHz

          highest turbo speed = 4.0 GHz

          TDP = 65w (same)

          cost $303

           

          And, if someone is not limited to a 65 watt TDP, the i7-6700k could be considered a best buy for low-end Premiere Pro systems by providing even better specs (4.0 to 4.2 GHz), but with a higher TDP (91 watts, probably not great for your "mini" system, but really great for any full-size PC build). Its cost is $339.

           

          On another note, I would personally refer to a GTX 1060 as high-end. That model may work fine for HD editing, but it is certainly not high end (GTX 980 Ti, GTX 1080, M6000, and TItan X models are).

           

          Regards,

           

          Jim

          • 2. Re: Intel i5-6500: What a great little CPU! (If you can't afford an i7, that is.)
            Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            JEShort01 wrote:

             

            On another note, I would personally refer to a GTX 1060 as high-end. That model may work fine for HD editing, but it is certainly not high end (GTX 980 Ti, GTX 1080, M6000, and TItan X models are).

             

            Regards,

             

            Jim

            If you consider Randall's constraints of low cost and size "tiny breadbox mini-ITX PC" it would be very hard to consider any of those GPU's.  I think his experiments along those lines it is a valuable contribution to the forum.

             

            I have a GTX 1060 that is faster than my GTX 970

            • 3. Re: Intel i5-6500: What a great little CPU! (If you can't afford an i7, that is.)
              RjL190365 Level 4

              Thanks. Jim is free to disagree. And you, Bill, are correct in that the size and cost restraints may preclude many graphics cards with oversized custom coolers. It depends in large part on the design of the breadbox-sized case. For example, my particular Fractal Design Core 500 case puts the GPU fans very close to the side panel vents; thus, the GPU fan(s) act as an intake.

               

              As for the particular GPU that's currently in that PC, it is an eVGA GeForce GTX 960 FTW with an ACX 2.0 cooler and 2GB of VRAM, model number 02G-P4-2968-KR. It is out of production, but may still be sold at retail.

               

              And the motherboard is a Gigabyte GA-H170N WiFi, based on the Intel H170 chipset that's better suited for a media PC than an editing rig (due in large part to its lack of overclockability and a memory speed that's limited to DDR4-2133), yet it still offers 16 PCI-e 3.0 lanes on top of the CPU's 16 available PCI-e 3.0 lanes.

              • 4. Re: Intel i5-6500: What a great little CPU! (If you can't afford an i7, that is.)
                RjL190365 Level 4

                By the way, I performed that same export on my main i7-4790K rig that had been overclocked to 4.7 GHz, and although very slightly faster than my i5 breadbox it wasn't sufficiently faster to justify the higher cost of four hyperthreaded cores. This suggests that the bottleneck in performance improvement is somewhere else (such as the RAM or disks), not the CPU.

                • 5. Re: Intel i5-6500: What a great little CPU! (If you can't afford an i7, that is.)
                  RjL190365 Level 4

                  An update on my i5-6500 testing:

                   

                  I re-ran my testing on my main i7-4790K rig (at both stock speed and at my current overclocked 4.7 GHz), and also simulated an i5-4690 CPU by disabling hyperthreading and locking the clock speed to 3.7 GHz, and ran the PPBM tests with CC 2017 on all of those configurations (the only difference being that the i5-6500 is equipped with the GTX 960 while my i7-4790K is equipped with the GTX 970).

                   

                  My results are as follows:

                   

                  "79","141","27","795", Premiere Version:, 11.0.0.154, simulated i5-4690 at 3.7 GHz with the GTX 970 SC

                  "79","102","26","542", Premiere Version:, 11.0.0.154, i7-4790K at default Turbo 4.2 GHz with the GTX 970 SC

                  "79","92","26","488", Premiere Version:, 11.0.0.154, i7-4790K at 4.7 GHz with the GTX 970 SC

                  "78","149","44","790", Premiere Version:, 11.0.0.154, i5-6500 at default Turbo 3.3 GHz with the GTX 960 FTW

                   

                  The first number is the Disk I/O result from a 512 GB Samsung 850 Pro (4790K) or a 500 GB Samsung 850 EVO (6500) SATA 6.0 Gbps SSD. The second number is the H.264 result, which uses a mix of GPU and CPU. The third number is the MPEG-2 DVD result with MPE GPU acceleration enabled. The last (and highlighted) number is the MPEG-2 DVD result with MPE in "software-only" mode.

                   

                  Looking at the "software only" (CPU-only) results with MPEG-2 DVD exports, it is clear that the i5-6500 is actually a tad faster than the older i5-4690; however, neither i5 CPU is as fast as any recent-generation desktop i7 CPU in Premiere. Also, it should be noted that the i5-6500 system is equipped with 16GB of DDR4-2400 RAM running at DDR4-2133 speed while the i7-4790K system is equipped with 32GB of DDR3-1600 RAM.