24 Replies Latest reply on Oct 12, 2016 7:36 PM by luciej70659689

    Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode

    luciej70659689 Level 1

      Hello,

       

      I've been experiencing issues with developing my images in Lightroom. Just got off the phone with the support team, when they after one hour and fifteen minutes were not able to solve my issue. It's getting very frustrating and I'm close to tears, because my images are so blurry!

      I shoot in RAW and on a tripod with Canon 70D landscape photos. After finishing working on them they look great in the develop mode, however in the library mode they are significantly blurry.

      After searching web I found lots of forums with people having this issue (but from 2011 or so), however it was not clear to me if anybody found any solution to this?

      I understand that library mode displays picture differently than the develop mode does, but after the download the image looks exactly like in the library mode - blurry.

      This should not be right. Or otherwise why to work on a picture in develop mode, if the changes were not applied to it in the end?

       

      Please, please help me with this. I have been using laptop with Windows 10 and Lightroom CC 2015.

       

      Thank you. I appreciate your time and advice.

        • 1. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
          ManiacJoe Adobe Community Professional

          Using Drobox.com or the like, can you link us to an unedited original file so we can see what you are seeing?

          A screen shot of your library view might be helpful, too.

          • 2. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
            Just Shoot Me Adobe Community Professional

            Delete the Preview Cache and let LR rebuilt it.

            • 3. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
              Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Screenshot would be useful. Remember the mantra: Do NOT judge image sharpness when zoomed out to fit or fill in either Develop or Library. Only judge sharpness when zoomed in at 1:1 or higher. Your screen is a very low resolution device and Lightroom does not apply output sharpening to the necessarily scaled down previews in Library so you are not seeing the full potential of the image at that size.

              • 4. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                luciej70659689 Level 1

                Hello,

                 

                Thank you for your time. I just downloaded dropbox, never used it before, so hopefully you can use the link for my Raw original photos. I'm providing two.

                I truly hope it's not me being a lousy photographer shooting blurry images. These two images were taken using a tripod.

                 

                https://www.dropbox.com/s/f2caalq3uuz60vs/IMG_0173.CR2?dl=0

                 

                https://www.dropbox.com/s/89gbosfz51harsi/IMG_8009.CR2?dl=0

                 

                Here is a screenshot of the library view for the first image:

                Screenshot (1).png

                 

                Thank you very much!

                • 5. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                  luciej70659689 Level 1

                  Hello,

                   

                  Thank you for your time. If I zoom at 1:1 in library mode and then in develop mode at 1:1 both images look identical. Only when I look at the image in "fit" I see the difference in sharpness. What you are saying confuses me and I have read a similar advice in different forum. But I guess it is hard to grasp: you look at the image as a whole (in "fit" or "fill" screen) and there you adjust sharpness. I mean am I supposed to adjust sharpness of an image when I zoom at 1:1? Then the image looks just fine and I would not adjust any sharpness. But if I look at the image as a whole without zooming in "fit" screen then it needs sharpening....I've had Lightroom for a year and still figuring things out, but this makes me lost.

                   

                  I'm providing a screenshot of an image in a library mode and then a screenshot of an image in a develop mode. Thank you for your advice!

                   

                  Screenshot (1).png

                   

                  This is a screenshot of an image in develop mode:

                   

                  Screenshot (2).png

                   

                  Thank you very much.

                  • 6. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                    luciej70659689 Level 1

                    Hello,

                     

                    Thank you for your time. The customer representative (an Adobe technician) did this remotely on my laptotp today without any change. 

                    • 7. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                      luciej70659689 Level 1

                      The difference in the sharpness is easily noticeable by a bare eye. I think it makes sense what you are saying that Lightroom does not apply output sharpening in previews in Library, but shouldn't be the sharpening done (and visible) in develop mode, applied to an exported image?

                      • 8. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                        Just Shoot Me Adobe Community Professional

                        Sorry to say this but in both of the images you posted on drop box nothing is really In Focus, not any part of either image.

                         

                        Doesn't matter how much sharpening is applied.

                         

                        But I am seeing the same thing in both the Develop and Library modules.

                         

                        Image of the mountains was shot @ f/22 which causes diffraction.  https://luminous-landscape.com/understanding-lens-diffraction/

                         

                        The other one of the dock/water is just a poorly focused image. Although shot at a lower f/stop, f/4, not one thing that I can find in that image is actually In Focus.

                         

                        As to the screen shots you posted I don't see any real difference between the 2 of them and on my system both Develop and Library look the same for the images you uploaded to drop box.

                        • 9. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                          Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                          Took a look at your two images. They are definitely very soft. The mountain image indeed has a problem because of using f/22 which will cause diffraction and blur the image. There is nothing up close to need such a small aperture, you are shooting very wide (16 mm) with a very sharp lens, and so it would have been better at around f/11. The second image has nothing in focus clearly and that causes some issues. Both improve with some sharpening but you get a lot of noise quickly. That said, with these images I don't see any difference between Library and Develop on my system. I now notice your screen's resolution is very low (1366x768). I can see the difference between Library and Develop in your screenshots clearly. Both me and Shoot me are probably looking at your images at a much higher resolution screen and there there is no real discernible difference. This is expected actually. Consider that you have a raw image with a much higher resolution than the display (5472x3648 vs 1366x768). In order to display this image in Fit view Lightroom has to scale it down many times. In Develop, it does this by a process called subsampling. A process that is called nearest neighbor scaling in Photoshop. It does this to speed up any calculations it does when you move sliders. This, while being tremendously faster than calculating the entire raw image every time, does have a tendency to appear sharper than the image really is. This happens because it amplifies noise in the image which we perceive as detail. You can see that the sharpening dialed in a lot of noise from your screenshot in the Detail panel. This effect is exacerbated by viewing on a low resolution screen because you see the pixels so much more clearly. On a high res screen you will have a very hard time seeing it. This is also the reason why you should not look at a zoomed out view when moving the sharpening sliders. The sharpening has an effect on the image at a length scale of about 1 pixel. When your image is scaled down by a factor of 6 about as is the case on your screen, there is absolutely no way you can show the effect as it all happens at length scales that cannot be shown by the display. What you were seeing is purely the effect of amplifying the noise. Lightroom has a little warning sign in the detail panel to that effect when you collapse the one-to-one preview it has above the sharpening sliders but that is only visible when you collapse that view unfortunately. It should always be there.

                           

                          When you look at an image in Library, you are watching a jpeg preview that is generated from rendering the image at full resolution and scaling that down to a lower preview resolution. This downscaling is done with a much better quality scaling algorithm than can be done in Develop since the computer only has to calculate the raw image once when it renders the jpeg. This does not amplify any noise and will appear a bit softer. This scaling algorithm is the same when you export to a similar lower resolution (e.g. for web display) image from Export in Lightroom. However, in export, contrary to the display in library view, you can apply some output sharpening. You should always do this if you are downscaling the image. Interestingly, this will make the image appear a bit more like the Develop view you saw.

                           

                          Bottom line is that the slight sharpness difference between zoomed out views in Library and Develop is an unavoidable consequence of the low-resolution nature of typical displays and the need to balance speed in Develop. This can be more obvious on very low resolution displays where the subsampling happening in Develop is quite extreme. On higher resolution displays it is hard to see.

                          1 person found this helpful
                          • 10. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                            luciej70659689 Level 1

                            Hello,

                             

                            Thank you for your detailed professional reply. It's a shocker to me. I have never heard about diffraction before! I have few friends, who shot images and are paid for it and they have never advice me about this. I took a photography class at college and aside that two paid photo classes and nobody mentioned diffraction. Because I shot landscapes I always heard/was advised to shot with aperture 22, but I did not know that this will cause less sharpness of the image! This made me very sad, because I have shot most of my images with a such aperture. Now, honestly I have no idea how to shot to have maximum depth of field and maximum sharpness and evidently I cannot learn this in any class

                            About the screen's resolution, I checked that and 1366x768 is the highest I can have on my laptop. I guess a more expensive laptop would have higher resolution. Nothing I can do about. Which computers have higher resolution of displays?

                            Thank you for the explanation of the subsampling. You clearly explained the difference between library and develop mode and even though I had to read it several times to understand, now I got it.

                            My poor photography skills, low resolution display and subsampling all play its role.

                            But now have no idea how to shoot sharp images.

                             

                            I appreciate your time and help!

                            • 11. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                              luciej70659689 Level 1

                              Hello,

                               

                              Thank you for your time and help. Like I said in my answer to Jao, I was not aware of diffraction. Now I have no idea how to shoot images, so they are sharp and with maximum depth of field.

                              The rest was explained by Jao.

                               

                              Thanks, Lucie

                              • 12. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                Just Shoot Me Adobe Community Professional

                                luciej70659689 wrote:

                                 

                                Hello,

                                 

                                Thank you for your time and help. Like I said in my answer to Jao, I was not aware of diffraction. Now I have no idea how to shoot images, so they are sharp and with maximum depth of field.

                                The rest was explained by Jao.

                                 

                                Thanks, Lucie

                                Time to start reading some of the great articles on photography, lens choices, DOF (Depth of Field) and so on that are out there on the net.

                                The mountain image you posted was shot with a 16mm lens. With that wide of an angle lens max DOF would be obtained with a f/stop of around f/5.6 to f/8, possibly even lower than f/5.6.

                                DOF is lens focal length dependent. Wide angle lenses, lower mm's, have greater DOF than telephoto lenses. Also DOF is distant dependent, focusing distance. The farther away something is you are focusing on the greater the natural DOF is. Closer focusing distance creates a shallower DOF.

                                • 13. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                  Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                  My poor photography skills, low resolution display and subsampling all play its role.

                                  But now have no idea how to shoot sharp images.

                                   

                                  I appreciate your time and help!

                                  Don't beat yourself up over that. The f/22 thing used to be ok advice in the film era when nobody looked that closely at images. Digital cameras however have such high resolutions nowadays and it is so easy to 'pixelpeep' that you can't do this without noticing the issues. It is important to understand that you generally don't need to go all the way if you don't have anything near. For example if you go to Online Depth of Field Calculator and enter a16mm lens, focus at about 8 feet distance you'll see that everything will be sharp from about 3 feet to infinity at f/8.  However if you have something at 1 foot distance (think a flower in the foreground), you do need f/22 and to focus at about 2 feet away. However you'll get some diffraction that will soften the image. There are tricks in that situation such as focus stacking but you might also just have to live with it. Point is to think about depth-of-field and to not go to high f/stop if you don't need it. There are many apps for smart phones that will help you calculate depth of field (I like PhotoPills for this) but the great thing about digital is that you can just look at the display on your camera zoom in on different parts and see if you need to stop down more. One rule of thumb with a near and far landscape is to focus at about 1/3 into the scene (so not at the nearest object!) and stop down only as much as you need to get everything sharp.  On most digital cameras, you can start noticing diffraction at f stops higher than f/11 and it might be a significant problem over f/16. There is a really good visualization of this effect here: Diffraction Limited Photography: Pixel Size, Aperture and Airy Disks where you can just enter your camera and see the effect of  aperture on light from one pixel spilling over into neighboring pixels.

                                   

                                  regarding the low-resolution screen, it is not a big deal and editing on it you just have to remember to not touch the sharpening if you are not zoomed in all the way. Maybe something to think about in the future If you have to replace your current machine. You might also think about using an external display for editing. That said we haven't even told you about screen calibration!

                                  • 14. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                    luciej70659689 Level 1

                                    Ok. I will start reading more articles online and get some books as well. I always thought and was mainly said that for the landscape to have the great depth of field I should be shooting f/22 the best. I had no idea that for example this mountain photo could be shot with aperture lower than 22!

                                    I also shot with the kit lens Canon 18-135mm. Friends told me that since it is a kit lens it's not that good. Does this mean that this kit lens is not considered "sharp" lens? This is really difficult. I'm a beginner and knowing, which lens I should shot with lower or higher aperture is hard.

                                    I know that practice makes perfect, so I guess I have to play with both lenses in the field and find the right aperture setting for each.

                                     

                                    So, for an image like this from the mountains, I should have shot with lower aperture when using wide angle lens. This way I would get great DOF and achieve sharpness of the image? Is this correct please?

                                     

                                    My last question: What about my focus? My friend photographer told me to focus on the closest thing in the frame to have great DOF?

                                     

                                    Thank you.

                                    • 15. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                      luciej70659689 Level 1

                                      Hello,

                                       

                                      Well I have been on several trips this year to places I will not have a chance going again, so I do beat myself up for this error. I'm feel pretty bad.

                                      It's misleading to hear and learn everywhere that for the landscape photography is the best shooting with f/22. Is this then a myth?

                                      I do not have any smart phone, so cannot use any apps. I will definitely read some articles and books.

                                      Thanks for your time, patience and advice.

                                      You are suggesting checking the camera's display, but isn't it often times misleading checking photos on the display of the camera? For example this photo in the mountains was taken on 15 miles hike and during not favorable conditions, at noon, bright sunlight, when I could not see very well screen. The photo looks differently on the camera's display and on the computer screen. Photos look always better on the camera's display!

                                      Do not tell me about screen calibration please! This is already confusing and I'm a bit overwhelmed now

                                       

                                      So to make sure I understand it correctly:

                                       

                                      for the landscape photography to achieve a great depth of field, if there is something in the foreground such a flower for example, I need to use f/22. But by this I have to sacrifice sharpness of the image. I need to focus in 1/3 of the frame to reach an optimal sharpness. This goes when I use the "sharp" wide angle lens I have.

                                       

                                      if there is nothing (no subject) in the foreground, I should use aperture that is less than f/22 (I have to play with the settings to find the optimal one). Like in the mountain photo f/11 or less should be good for a great depth of field. Again I should be focusing on 1/3 of the frame.

                                       

                                      Is my understanding correct?

                                       

                                      My friend/photographer always told me to focus on the closest object in the frame to reach the greatest depth of field. However you advised me not to focus to the nearest object, but in general on 1/3 of the frame.

                                       

                                      I also shot a lot with a kit Canon lens 18-135 mm. This might not be that good or sharp lens. Does this mean I need to probably use f/18 to achieve a great depth of field?

                                       

                                      I will definitely read more on this. This is harder than I thought tough.

                                       

                                      Thank you again, I will not take more of your time.

                                      • 16. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                        Abambo Adobe Community Professional

                                        I had no idea that for example this mountain photo could be shot with aperture lower than 22!

                                        You are in digital photography. Start experimenting with aperture. Each lens has an aperture at which it shoots the sharpest. You can get that aperture from the tests for a specific lens. Just look around, my first guess would be www.dpreview.com.

                                        I also shot with the kit lens Canon 18-135mm. Friends told me that since it is a kit lens it's not that good.

                                        Every lens is good, but there are some that are better. You need to live with the faults of your lens. Kit lenses tend to be cheap (with cheap cameras). There must be a difference between a 100€ lens and a 1000€ lens. The 18-135 lens is probably a good travel lens, because it's light and has a big focal range.

                                        So, for an image like this from the mountains, I should have shot with lower aperture when using wide angle lens. This way I would get great DOF and achieve sharpness of the image? Is this correct please?

                                        DOF depends on the aperture. But a lower aperture may also be well in the range of a sharp image. Use a DOF calculator to see the DOF changes. Online Depth of Field Calculator .

                                        My last question: What about my focus? My friend photographer told me to focus on the closest thing in the frame to have great DOF?

                                        See the DOF calculator. But yes, basically this is true. I however never focus the "closest thing", but the most interesting thing. The thing, I want being in Focus.

                                         

                                        You have a digital camera, so after taking your shoot, look at the picture at 100% magnification to appreciate the sharpness.As long as you are at your spot, you can re-shoot, if necessary.

                                         

                                        You may also look at the histogram to see if the exposure is correct. Best for exposure is bracketing.

                                        I'm a beginner and knowing, which lens I should shot with lower or higher aperture is hard.

                                        We all learned by doing. Nobody learned just be looking into the theory. But it is good to know, what experts say on your lens.

                                        1 person found this helpful
                                        • 17. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                          Just Shoot Me Adobe Community Professional

                                          luciej70659689 wrote:

                                           

                                           

                                          I also shot with the kit lens Canon 18-135mm. Friends told me that since it is a kit lens it's not that good. Does this mean that this kit lens is not considered "sharp" lens? This is really difficult. I'm a beginner and knowing, which lens I should shot with lower or higher aperture is hard.

                                          I know that practice makes perfect, so I guess I have to play with both lenses in the field and find the right aperture setting for each.

                                           

                                          So, for an image like this from the mountains, I should have shot with lower aperture when using wide angle lens. This way I would get great DOF and achieve sharpness of the image? Is this correct please?

                                           

                                          My last question: What about my focus? My friend photographer told me to focus on the closest thing in the frame to have great DOF?

                                           

                                          Thank you.

                                          Kit lenses vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. Normally they aren't the best lenses, they are offered so you have a complete package that you can use as soon as the battery is charged. That is if you don't already own any lenses made from the camera manufacturer and or don't have any lenses that fit on the camera you are buying.

                                          To look up the specs on that lens go to dpreview.com and read up on it.

                                          Also since your camera has a reduced sensor size, from a full 35mm sized sensor, it already has more Depth of Field than a larger sensor camera has. As the sensor size grows the DoF reduces. As the mm of a lens grows the DoF reduced. Wide Angle lenses, even your Kit lens, @ 18mm has a much greater DoF than it has at 135mm.

                                          You don't have to become an expert to take good photos but you do need some basic knowledge of general photography. Which at this time you don't have.

                                          We all had to start someplace. We aren't born with this knowledge, we all had to learn it.

                                           

                                          Actually you want to focus on what you want In Focus. Whether it is Near or Far. Even with great, deep, large, Depth of Field what is really In Focus is what you actually focused the lens on.

                                          • 18. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                            Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                            Well I have been on several trips this year to places I will not have a chance going again, so I do beat myself up for this error. I'm feel pretty bad.

                                            You shouldn't. The mountain goat picture is nice. It's technically not perfect but that is really secondary to the main goal. As Ansel said: "there is nothing worse than a sharp photograph of a fuzzy idea." This at least has a great subject : majestic mountain scenery and a bit of a story. Even with the fuzziness you can get great prints from this image and you will never notice a problem in copies from this image that you send over the web as the lower resolution of such images will not show any of this. To calibrate you, I have images from my old 12 megapixel camera that are printed 5 feet high hanging in places. I can't look at them too closely as all I see is that they are unsharp at that size. Probably less sharp than your image! People still tell me that they are so incredibly detailed and amazingly sharp!

                                             

                                            It's misleading to hear and learn everywhere that for the landscape photography is the best shooting with f/22. Is this then a myth?

                                            Yes, that is a myth indeed. There used to be some truth to it when people shot large format film (i.e. 4x5 inch would be smallish), where you generally have to stop down far more to get everything in focus and where f/22 is not even a very small f/stop and people would go to f/64. When you are working with a small sensor (the 7D is one of those), you generally work with short focal lengths relatively and you get greatly improved depth of field over larger formats where you need longer lenses for the same field-of-view. On a crop camera, you should only need f/22 in extreme cases where your nearest subject is within a few feet and you want everything sharp to infinity.

                                             

                                            for the landscape photography to achieve a great depth of field, if there is something in the foreground such a flower for example, I need to use f/22. But by this I have to sacrifice sharpness of the image. I need to focus in 1/3 of the frame to reach an optimal sharpness. This goes when I use the "sharp" wide angle lens I have.

                                            Yes, only when you have something very close do you have to go that small with aperture. In general, when you are doing a grand landscape with something near and something far, you can get optimal results by focusing somewhat behind the nearest subject. The reason is that there is an area before the plane of optimal sharpness that is still sharp. If you focus on the nearest subject, you are not using this effect optimally. You can see this in the depth of field calculator I linked to above. There is also the concept of a hyperfocal distance. At that distance, if you focus on it, everything from there until infinity will be acceptably sharp including some are before that distance. This distance is dependent on the focal length and the aperture. Street photographers sometimes use this and focus at that distance and lock the focus in and just shoot and not worry about focusing. In landscape photography it can be a useful technique too and it is actually what the 1/3 into the scene rule is a variant of. The big caveat however is that if you have a person or an animal in the frame, you are generally best of focusing on this as this is where the viewer will put the most scrutiny and it's best if that is perfectly in focus.

                                             

                                            My friend/photographer always told me to focus on the closest object in the frame to reach the greatest depth of field. However you advised me not to focus to the nearest object, but in general on 1/3 of the frame.

                                            Yeah the closest object thing is not true but is very commonly taught and you'll find many very experienced people that think this. It works but is simply not optimal. The reason is again that the in-focus area extends before as well as behind the plane of focus. If you want to minimize the f/stop you are using in order to avoid diffraction, it is best to focus into the scene a bit so you are maximizing what is in focus and decreasing the need to stop down. This is a somewhat advanced technique and generally you shouldn't worry too much about it and just focus on the important subject in the image.

                                             

                                            I also shot a lot with a kit Canon lens 18-135 mm. This might not be that good or sharp lens. Does this mean I need to probably use f/18 to achieve a great depth of field?

                                            No, this is independent of the lens. Depth-of-field really only depends on the focal length you are using and the f stop. This lens is probably best around f/8 but I wouldn't hesitate using it at any f/stop. Most kit lenses nowadays are really very good, especially for landscape photography. What more expensive lenses are good at is staying sharp at very small f/stops where you have very little depth-of-field. This is because they are used for portraits and what you want there is the background to be blurry but your subject to be tack sharp. Most kit lenses at their widest aperture don't perform very well and they generally cannot go to as low f/stops as more expensive lenses anyway. As soon as you stop down a bit which you generally have to do in landscape photography, you would have a very hard time distinguishing a >1000$ lens from a typical kit lens. The great thing about kit lenses is that they are generally very light weight and if you have to hike long distances into the wilderness that is a great benefit that is very much worth the slight loss in fidelity. This kit lens is actually optically rather good if I can believe the reviews online. Together with the ultra wide Tokina, which is a superb lens, this is a great set of gear and you really do not have to treat your lenses different from each other.

                                            1 person found this helpful
                                            • 19. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                              ManiacJoe Adobe Community Professional

                                              A good write-up by Jao.

                                               

                                              For more research, the terms you are looking for are "depth of field" and "hyperfocal distance".

                                              • 21. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                                luciej70659689 Level 1

                                                Hello Jao,

                                                 

                                                Thank you very much again for your further explanation. I will print your answers out to keep them handy.

                                                 

                                                Thanks for clarifying the aperture issue. It now makes sense more sense to me.

                                                 

                                                You know how to explain many important aspects of photography. Are you providing any online classes or courses? Your patience and expertise would help many people.

                                                 

                                                I even have not asked about aperture and focus when flying in a helicopter (doors off). I know that's an advance photography, but oh well it does not discourage me from shooting in such difficult conditions (while being motion sick). I had lots of noise in the images, because I raised ISO due to a motion plus with the wrong aperture....Well anyway this is not a part of my original question.

                                                 

                                                I have received my Canon camera from Canon service today. I complained for a specific spot in the frame, which was not cleanable by professionals. I thought it was a dust spot under low pass filter. However the invoice from Canon did not mention anything about this spot (I sent it there for), but that "the circuit board did not operate properly and the image density was not correct". I will call Canon tomorrow to clarify this for me.

                                                 

                                                Yep, I'm learning.

                                                 

                                                Thank you!

                                                • 22. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                                  luciej70659689 Level 1

                                                  Hello,

                                                   

                                                  Thank you for your feedback. Yes, I have a lot to learn and the best way is to practice, not just "cramming" on a theory.

                                                  I think that I do have some basic knowledge of digital photography and saying that I do not have any seems to me to be harsh. I know many people who have their $3000 cameras to take only selfies or shoot in jpeg and in an auto mode.

                                                  I value your feedback you provided me with.

                                                   

                                                  Thank you!

                                                  • 23. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                                    Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                                                    Hello Jao,

                                                     

                                                    Thank you very much again for your further explanation. I will print your answers out to keep them handy.

                                                    Always happy to explain things. These are difficult subjects that even pros not always get right.

                                                     

                                                    You know how to explain many important aspects of photography. Are you providing any online classes or courses? Your patience and expertise would help many people.

                                                    I teach a few hands on classes both in beginning and advanced photography (mostly outdoor photography) and in Lightroom editing locally. No online classes unfortunately. I have little time left over after everything else.

                                                     

                                                    I even have not asked about aperture and focus when flying in a helicopter (doors off). I know that's an advance photography, but oh well it does not discourage me from shooting in such difficult conditions (while being motion sick). I had lots of noise in the images, because I raised ISO due to a motion plus with the wrong aperture....Well anyway this is not a part of my original question.

                                                    I would say that it is always better to get the shot than to worry too much about it being perfect. So treat it as an opportunity to learn and in the mean time you probably got memorable shots even if they are not technically perfect. I've never shot from a heli but I would guess that you don't need to stop down as most things are not going to be very close and indeed best to go for high shutter speed.

                                                     

                                                    the circuit board did not operate properly and the image density was not correct

                                                    Don't know what they mean by that but it sounds like something was wrong with the electronics of your camera and it wasn't exposing correctly. Indeed your images above seem underexposed by about a stop which could be caused by a problem with the camera electronics.

                                                     

                                                    Dust spots on the sensor are a recurring thing in digital photography. I clean my sensors myself but most folks either don't notice (because they never stop down far enough to notice them) or send the camera in. Likely Canon cleaned your sensor as a routine part of any repair so your spot might be gone already and they did not really specify that on the repair sheet.

                                                    • 24. Re: Blurry images in library mode and after download versus in develop mode
                                                      luciej70659689 Level 1

                                                      Hello Jao,

                                                       

                                                      Thanks again for your reply. I talked to Canon repair service center and they told me that they had forgotten to check on the issue I had had sent the camera in (sigh). So I had to send my camera in again. Hopefully this time they will not forget.

                                                       

                                                      Well, thanks for helping me with my issues and answering my questions. Very helpful.

                                                       

                                                      I wish you happy shooting and good light!