10 Replies Latest reply on Oct 14, 2016 1:51 AM by D Fosse

    What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)

    B_Taylor

      I have dual monitors and have calibrated them separately with x-rite i1Display Pro. I have set the proper profiles as defaults in Windows, but I don't see how to get Lightroom to use the profiles. I found one place in Photoshop, but it doesn't load the default preset automatically nor does it give me a way to set the profile for 2 monitors. Adobe stresses that monitors should be calibrated, preferably with a third party device and I have read that both programs use the calibrated profile, but I don't quite understand the process that Adobe uses.

        • 1. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
          wobertc Adobe Community Professional

          I don't quite understand the process that Adobe uses.

          I don't understand at all, but you may find more info-

           

           

          Once the display is calibrated and a profile of this

          behavior is created, applications like Adobe

          Photoshop have the information they

          need about the condition of the display to

          allow proper and correct image previews.

           

          A quote from this article- http://digitaldog.net/files/02The%20difference%20between%20profiling%20and%20calibration.p df

          A lot of information on Andrew Rodney's site- Digital Dog :: Main

          • 2. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
            Michael J. Hoffman Adobe Community Professional

            Calibrating the monitor, and setting the monitor profile, is an operating system task that is accomplished with your X-Rite tools. This sets the monitor profile for Windows, and it is independent of any individual program.

             

            Color settings in Photoshop and Lightroom have what is called a "working space" that determines how the files are handled internally to the program while you are editing the files. The translation from the working color space to the monitor color space is handled automatically, and there is nothing you need to do.

             

            So, in summary:

             

            1. Do calibrate your monitor(s) with the X-Rite tools.

            2. In Photoshop, use the appropriate working space for your images (SRGB, AdobeRGB, ProPhoto RGB, whatever you prefer)

            3. In Lightroom, no action is required.

             

            Mike

            • 3. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
              B_Taylor Level 1

              Well, that's not quite true. Consider, I can set up Photoshop in Edit>Color Settings>RGB to use my x-rite color profile for monitor 1. Opening an image on monitor 1 in LR (windowed) and selecting Edit in Photoshop (with Lightroom adjustments) opens an error box stating that the image in LR has a color profile of ProPhoto RGB that will be discarded if I proceed. Doing so results in an image that is drastically different than what is shown in Lightroom. So: 1. Lightroom is not using my x-rite color profile, 2. Moving the Photoshop window from monitor 1 to monitor 2 alters the image , indicating that Photoshop is using the same profile on both monitors. In fact I am not sure that Photoshop knows that I have two monitors. Interestingly, the ProPhoto RGB image looks better than the image using my x-rite profile.

              • 4. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
                Just Shoot Me Adobe Community Professional

                That is because you have a color profile mismatch. Irrespective on the monitor profile both LR and PS should be set to the same color space. Since you can't change the color space LR uses set PS to ProPhoto.

                 

                Also you should get a warning box stating you have color mismatch and the option to leave the image in the color space it has or convert it to what PS is set to. That is unless you disabled that warning dialog.

                 

                You shouldn't be using the monitor profile as the color space in PS. That is for the monitor to display the correct colors that are sent to it by program like LR and PS.

                • 5. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
                  D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  B_Taylor wrote:

                   

                  I can set up Photoshop in Edit>Color Settings>RGB to use my x-rite color profile for monitor 1

                  Don't ever do that. You clearly misunderstand how this works.

                   

                  Color management always requires two profiles, a source profile and a destination profile.Each profile is a description of its corresponding color space. One is converted into the other.

                   

                  A color managed display path converts from the document profile into the monitor profile, and the result of that conversion is sent to the monitor.

                   

                  Let the x-rite software install the monitor profile on system level. Done.Lightroom and Photoshop will find and use the profile and there's nothing more you need to do.

                  • 6. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
                    D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    Just Shoot Me wrote:

                     

                    Irrespective on the monitor profile both LR and PS should be set to the same color space.

                    Er, no. There's no need for Lightroom and Photoshop to match here. The whole point of color managed applications is that they will display correctly no matter what document profile.

                     

                    The document profile embedded in the file will always override whatever you have set as working space, which is just a fallback default.

                     

                    Since you can't change the color space LR uses set PS to ProPhoto.

                    ...and in any case Lightroom doesn't use standard ProPhoto, but a custom variety with linear tone response curve (gamma). So they still won't be the same - which they don't have to be anyway.

                    • 7. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
                      Michael J. Hoffman Adobe Community Professional

                      B_Taylor wrote:

                       

                      1. Edit>Color Settings>RGB to use my x-rite color profile for monitor

                       

                      2. Edit in Photoshop (with Lightroom adjustments) opens an error box stating that the image in LR has a color profile of ProPhoto RGB that will be discarded if I proceed.

                       

                      3. indicating that Photoshop is using the same profile on both monitors. In fact I am not sure that Photoshop knows that I have two monitors.

                       

                      1. Ouch! As Dag Fosse says above, never ever do this. Set your working RGB space to a reasonable standard like AdobeRGB or ProPhotoRGB (or sRGB, if you must). Never use your monitor profile as a working space profile.

                       

                      2. In your color settings in Photoshop, you need to (a) have a proper working RGB as noted above, and (b) for "Profile Mismatch" you should have either "convert to working space" or "use embedded profile." Never discard the profile. It's all meaningless color numbers of you do.

                       

                      3. Photoshop doesn't know nor care how many monitors you have, nor what their monitor color space/profile is. That is 100% handles by the operating system. This is the core of color management - the interpretation of color numbers as the image moves from one device to another to another. There are always two, a master and an apprenti-.... um, sorry, I mean a source and a destination space. The operating system owns getting the image translated to the monitor's profile, regardless of which monitor is in use. If you look in Windows' display properties, and look at the advanced section, you'll (hopefully) find your monitor profile listed there under color management - seamlessly installed by X-Rite's color profiling software, and ready for use.

                       

                      I suggest following the lin above to the Digital Dog's website, and spending two or three days reading all you can on color management. You will benefit greatly.

                       

                      Mike

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                      • 8. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
                        B_Taylor Level 1

                        Thanks to all for the advice. I have been and will continue to try to learn more about this subject. The question that continues to nag me is why Photoshop allows me to change the color settings to the profile created by x-rite if should never ever be done.

                        • 9. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
                          Conrad C Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                          If you are adjusting the Working Spaces in Photoshop Color Settings, you're not changing or affecting which profile your display uses. The main purpose of the Working Spaces is to set the defaults for when an image doesn't already have an embedded profile. If you open an image and it's already tagged sRGB, Adobe RGB, or whatever, the profile you set for the RGB working space won't apply, because the image already has a valid profile and doesn't need a different one. Since many images today are already tagged with something by the time they get to Photoshop, the RGB working spaces are used less often today than they've been in the past. They make the most difference for those who open a blank Photoshop document to paint some graphics from scratch, because Photoshop needs to know which profile to assume for that new blank document.

                           

                          Less commonly today, the working space is also useful when an image comes in that doesn't already have an embedded profile. But in most of those cases, the profile you want to apply is a standard one like sRGB or Adobe RGB, not the display profile.

                           

                          Basically, most of the stuff in Color Settings is about defaults and converting a document between profiles. There are some monitor settings in the Advanced Controls section, but most users won't need or want to touch those. There is no setting in there that affects the display profile.

                           

                          Like the others said, Photoshop and Lightroom do what all properly color-managed applications do: They pass their output to the OS, which corrects image color based on the display profile for each monitor. That's why Photoshop and Lightroom have no display profile settings. They're not supposed to, display profile correction is the job of the OS color management system.

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                          • 10. Re: What monitor color profile does LR and PS use? (Dual Setup)
                            D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                            Conrad C wrote:

                             

                            They're not supposed to, display profile correction is the job of the OS color management system.

                            I feel a bit awkward here, but again, I have to be devil's advocate.

                             

                            The fact is that this single sentence yanks the rug out from under my whole carefully constructed argument, when I try to explain to people why there is a difference between color managed and non-color managed applications, and why they can see that difference right up front on their screens.

                             

                            It goes like this: Color management is performed by the application, not the operating system. Some do it and some don't.

                             

                            This distinction is vital, because it helps explain the difference between monitor profile and monitor calibration, and why one is part of the color management chain and the other not (or very indirectly). It helps explain why a broken monitor profile has no effect on applications that don't use it.

                             

                            Yes, it's true that in Mac OS X, the actual process of converting from document profile into the monitor profile is handed over from the app to OS X ColorSync. On Windows this is not so, there is no ColorSync equivalent, and the whole process is performed by the (color managed) application itself - on the fly I should add, without any intervention from the user.

                             

                            The job of the OS is to make profiles available as applications request them.

                             

                            Lightroom and Photoshop use the monitor profiles they are handed by the OS, independently for each display. That, BTW, also answers the original question here.

                             

                            I may be nitpicking here, but these details are important. in order to get a clear picture of what's going on. I know Conrad knows this and it was just an ambigous phrasing.

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