7 Replies Latest reply on Nov 9, 2016 2:23 AM by LariosoDog

    Are Adobe good at maintaining older versions?

    LariosoDog Level 1

      Looking at forum you see plenty posts of people running everything back to PRE 7 and everything in between.

      This seems rather impressive.

       

      Are Adobe good at maintenance?

       

      Do you get updates on older version when a new major release arrived?

       

      Thanks.

        • 1. Re: Are Adobe good at maintaining older versions?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Adobe supports only the current versions of its program. Although some recent versions will continue to receive updates for Camera RAW editing.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Are Adobe good at maintaining older versions?
            LariosoDog Level 1

            Ok, thanks.

            So Adobe nail the bugs in current version until next major release then.

             

            How many updates did PRE14 get, if I may ask?

             

            So far in PRE15 I had only one crash when exiting, never while running it - and referring to editor something.

            Where to report issues to assist in narrow in on bugs?

             

            Thanks.

            • 3. Re: Are Adobe good at maintaining older versions?
              Peru Bob Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              LariosoDog wrote:

               

               

               

              How many updates did PRE14 get, if I may ask?

               

               

              Just one.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Are Adobe good at maintaining older versions?
                whsprague Adobe Community Professional

                Updates and upgrades are confusing. 

                 

                Peru Bob is right.  PrE 14 became 14.1.

                 

                However, there were more minor updates than that.  Adobe Camera RAW ("ACR") is primarily a photographer's tool.  It is essentially a set of tables that interpret the proprietary, unprocessed formats of camera manufacturers.  Adobe updates it every couple of months to include the newest cameras released to the market.  If you have a brand new camera and use Photoshop or Lightroom a lot, it is important. 

                 

                Since Premier Elements can be used to make "slide shows", it needs to be able to accept raw photo files too.  So, during the lifespan of a PrE version, it will get the ACR updates along with the photo programs.   Version 14 started with ACR 9.0 and finishes with ACR 9.6. 

                 

                If you have a camera produced after the end of version 14 and want to use raw format photos in PrE, you will need to buy version 15.  

                 

                One of the most senior regular contributors here will post that PrE needs to have all photos used in a project be resized and in a JPEG format.  When I see him do that I will counter that I've created projects with up to a 100 full sized, untouched raw photos.  The project was huge and the files big.  Premier Elements had no trouble and did not balk.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Are Adobe good at maintaining older versions?
                  Peru Bob Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  whsprague wrote:

                   

                   

                   

                  One of the most senior regular contributors here will post that PrE needs to have all photos used in a project be resized and in a JPEG format. When I see him do that I will counter that I've created projects with up to a 100 full sized, untouched raw photos. The project was huge and the files big. Premier Elements had no trouble and did not balk.

                  That may have something to do with individual computer specifications.

                  • 6. Re: Are Adobe good at maintaining older versions?
                    whsprague Adobe Community Professional

                    Peru Bob wrote:

                     

                    whsprague wrote:

                     

                     

                     

                     

                    That may have something to do with individual computer specifications.

                    You are right!  Of course it does.  It is common to suggest an i7, 16GB RAM and a 7200RPM HDD for Premier Elements users.   That's what I have.  In fact, it is a now "older" laptop with a "slower" i7.

                     

                    Bill

                    • 7. Re: Are Adobe good at maintaining older versions?
                      LariosoDog Level 1

                      Thanks for all input.

                      Just one question remains - how do you feed back to Adobe possible info about bugs?

                       

                      I have an stationary computer with Windows 7 and i7 and 16G ram so I think it should work.

                      But looking at the benchmark Windows does stating that culprit might be graphics card - being a simple GeForce 210 I think it was.

                      But if it works - don't fix it - as they say and read about 710 card that somebody had a problem with - this for using daws, so a bit hesitant upgrading.

                       

                      The crash I had is more like programming error, I think, rather than equipment as such. Graphics card problems are more likely to crash while running video or something - not just when exiting which probably is corrupt memory stack or similar. But since ending up in Windows the report is in event viewer to find.

                       

                      I will try and resize still images to same as video and see what quality I get - 1920x1080 in this case.

                      But will also test with a project to keep inserted images in higher resolution - thinking like for audio that any effects calculated might look better if some redundancy in source material. But will use correct aspect ratio not to create skew of some sort.

                       

                      As now retired programmer I know using computers will involve experimenting a lot.

                      But sometimes I resort to ask question to shortcut some of that - and you are a helpful bunch here so....