4 Replies Latest reply on Nov 27, 2016 8:22 PM by whsprague

    MOV to M2TS using PE14?

    Alokep Level 1

      I'm using PE14 to convert MOV files (from iPhones) to M2TS files (generated by Panasonic video cameras and edited by HD Writer AE 3.0 supplied with the camera).

       

      I have tried a few options but the files created by PE14 will not open in HDAE3. I have tried M2T - H.264 option in PE14 "Export and Share". The files created don't have the .m2ts extension. Renaming the files to that extension did not work.

       

      By the way, the codec info in VLC media player for valid M2TS files from my Panasonic is as follows:

       

      Video:

      H264 - MPEG-4 AVC (part 10) (h264)

      1920 x 1090

      59.94 fps

      Planar 4:2:0 YUV

       

      Audio:

      A25 Audio (AC3) (a52)

      48000 Hz

      384 kb/s

       

      How do I convert Quicktime MOV to the above format?

        • 1. Re: MOV to M2TS using PE14?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          If you're looking to convert rather than edit video, I'd recommend the free download Handbrake.

          • 2. Re: MOV to M2TS using PE14?
            whsprague Level 4

            Why is it that you want to use HDWriter instead of Premiere Elements, or even any other editor?

             

            HDWriter is unique software that will only edit Panasonic footage.  I stuck with it for a year or two when I bought my first camcorder.  Except for a few unique functions, it is terribly limited.  I abandoned it for Premier Elements. 

             

            HDWriter exists to support special functions offered in Panasonic cameras.  In order to function, HDWriter has to have a set of files created by the camera to supplement the actual video file.   You have to use HDWriter exclusively to move files to you computer or it won't function.  No other brand of camera, including iPhones, will make the extra set of files needed.   Nothing, including Handbrake, will "convert" to HDWriter formats because of the odd proprietary files required by HDWriter.  

             

            I suggest you make Premier Elements your editor.  It will work with the .mts or .m2ts files straight from the camera.  You can discard the rest.  Once you establish your project settings for the primary footage, you should be able to use footage from second cameras like your phone. 

            • 3. Re: MOV to M2TS using PE14?
              Alokep Level 1

              Thanks for the replies.

              Steve: It is more than just file conversion in most cases.  But it appears that HDwAE depends on some special index files that are created by the Panasonic cameras.  So I might be SOL in trying to use it with other media files.

               

              whsprague: You are correct in that HDwAE is limited to handling files produced by the Panasonic cam.  I copied some m2ts files (but not the index files) from the camera into a different directory.  HDwAE could not see the files.  So, it indeed is looking for those index files.

               

              As for switching to Premiere for editing, my needs are very modest, and until now, HDwAE was sufficient.  I'll have to re-think that now that I'd like to incorporate other media into my edited videos....

              • 4. Re: MOV to M2TS using PE14?
                whsprague Level 4

                Alokep wrote:

                 

                As for switching to Premiere for editing, my needs are very modest, and until now, HDwAE was sufficient. I'll have to re-think that now that I'd like to incorporate other media into my edited videos....

                My first video camera was in the TM900 family from Panasonic.  It was called a SDT-750, was nearly identical, but was packaged with 3D tools.  I learned HDWriter.  Then I added a Sony camera.  Both were "AVCHD".  The Sony came with some software too.  No matter how hard I tried, I could get the software from one accept clips from the other.

                 

                I don't do 3D, but still use the camera sometimes.

                 

                If you want to combine clips from multiple cameras you will have to look at other software.  Among the half dozen common choices, Premiere Elements is very good.  One of the best parts is that there is terrific training opportunities.   You can acquire the skills in a weekend or two if you take the right course!

                 

                Bill