9 Replies Latest reply on Jan 17, 2018 7:48 AM by Dov Isaacs

    Sharing typekit fonts with printer

    MrMcQuillen Level 1

      I've been trying to find an answer to this question, and haven't found anything concrete...

       

      Now that Typekit has become a mainstay, it brings up the issue that as designers we are unable to package fonts with jobs as we used to. Before Typekit locked fonts down, we could package fonts and send them along with a file to a printer, so if the printer (for whatever reason) ever had to open a native file etc. they would have the fonts. According to the language in Adobe products:

       

      "For font software licensed from Adobe, your license agreement provides that you may take a copy of the font(s) you have used for a particular file to a commercial printer or other service provider, and the provider may use the font(s) to process your file..."

       

      So, my question is - if we are unable to package fonts from Typekit, how are we supposed to "bring" the fonts to our printer? Is there anything in the works to allow the sharing of fonts from Typekit, within the limits of the license agreement of course, but seems like there is no way to do this. Any help is appreciated, thanks!

        • 2. Re: Sharing typekit fonts with printer
          Jakub P. Level 1

          The Typekit Services Agreement does not permit fonts synced from Typekit to be transferred to another user or computer that isn't already licensed for that font.

           

          The "Packaging files that use synced fonts" help page has more information on this: http://help.typekit.com/customer/portal/articles/1166052

           

          For now, you can export a PDF and send this to the printer, or the print bureau can easily use the same fonts if they have a Typekit account or full Creative Cloud subscription.

           

          I'm sorry I couldn't be of more help here. Let me know if you have any further questions.

           

          Jakub

          • 3. Re: Sharing typekit fonts with printer
            MimiLaTulipe Level 1

            you cannot force printers to move to typekit....

            • 4. Re: Sharing typekit fonts with printer
              Dov Isaacs Adobe Employee

              … And that is exactly why for modern print workflows, we most strongly advocate production of PDF (and preferably PFD/X-4) files with fonts embedded from which your printers produce printed output in lieu of sending them source files including placed imagery and fonts.

               

                        - Dov

              • 5. Re: Sharing typekit fonts with printer
                Dov Isaacs Adobe Employee

                MrMcQuillen  wrote

                 

                … "For font software licensed from Adobe, your license agreement provides that you may take a copy of the font(s) you have used for a particular file to a commercial printer or other service provider, and the provider may use the font(s) to process your file..."

                You are quoting only part of Adobe's EULA (End User License Agreement). Yes, you can provide a copy of a font you licensed from Adobe with source files in which you use such a font to a printer, but only if the printer has licensed the font as well. There is no “free use” of fonts for printers, even if many print service providers blatantly violate these rules and request fonts that they have no license for from customers.

                 

                The best solution to this is for customers to submit print ready PDF/X-4 files (with fonts embedded) to their print service providers. This solution is totally compatible with Typekit!

                 

                          - Dov

                • 6. Re: Sharing typekit fonts with printer
                  MrMcQuillen Level 1

                  Thanks Dov,

                  I understand what you're saying. I haven't looked at the entire user license agreement, but that language is from the window that pops up in InDesign when packaging a file, and nowhere in there does it say that the printer you are taking the file to has to have a license for the font as well. If that were the case, why would I be giving them the font? I mean, if they have a license then it stands to reason that they already have the font.

                   

                  You're right, a solution is to submit PDFs, and I have worked for print houses that only accept PDFs with fonts embedded. However, I currently work for a university, and we publish magazines, and given the tight deadlines and need to turnaround last-minute edits quickly, we often provide the printer with native files so they can make adjustments on their end. So, I don't think there is a one-size-fits-all solution, other than the ability to share fonts with printers, which I don't see as a gross violation of font licenses - fonts I purchase, whether through Adobe or directly, should be practical for me to use and share with other professionals. Maybe not the best analogy, but imagine if your mechanic had to buy a special license for every type of car they work on? They don't own the rights or have an agreement with every specific car company, nor do those companies get paid every time the mechanic works on their car, yet they are allowed to do so because they are professionals in their field. They didn't purchase the car, they are just a 3rd party working on it, and therefore have no obligation to the original car maker. I dunno, just my 2 cents. If it's in the writing then I guess it's in the writing, I'll look over the user agreement further.

                  • 7. Re: Sharing typekit fonts with printer
                    Dov Isaacs Adobe Employee

                    The reason why in non-PDF/X workflows you would want to provide a font to a “printer” is that it is possible that you have a different version of the font (from the same vendor), either newer or older, and that by not using the same version, you might get different results, especially if a newer version has additional glyphs that the older version doesn't have or if font metrics have been corrected in newer versions.

                     

                    In terms of your comparison with automobile mechanics, you purchase actual auto parts. With software (and fonts are software), what you are purchasing is a license to use the software (in this case the fonts). You don't own the fonts, you own a license to use the fonts.

                     

                    Don't shoot the messenger, but that is how licensing works. By the way, a similar situation exists with music. You can buy a CD in which case you own the physical media, but it comes with a license that the owner of the CD can play the music for their own private purposes. A radio station, for example, cannot buy a CD and play the music over the airways without paying an additional license fee for that purpose.

                     

                              - Dov

                     

                    PS:     I am not a lawyer! 

                    • 8. Re: Sharing typekit fonts with printer
                      MrMcQuillen Level 1

                      Thanks again Dov,

                      I appreciate your detailed responses. I think that's still a stretch regarding the old/new font situation, because if that printer owns a license why wouldn't they just update on their end? But, I can see that maybe if there were an older version used they don't have access to then it would be useful - that seems like a pretty limited scenario though - but I see your point.

                       

                      I like your analogy about music, but I think it needs revision. In this analogy, if the printer were the radio station, then yes, it would be illegal and wrong for them to play the music to make money without paying for a license. But, in this case, it's more appropriate to say that I have purchased the license by buying a CD or whatever, and I am playing it at someone else's house. They aren't making anything off of it, they are simply a 3rd party in the transaction. As long as they aren't burning copies of it and selling it, that should be OK in my eyes. In other words, expecting a printer to buy a license of a font just to use it once to open and adjust/print a native file is like asking my friend to purchase the rights to an album because they are listening to my copy of the CD. It doesn't make sense to me. I'm no lawyer either, but you don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows

                      • 9. Re: Sharing typekit fonts with printer
                        Dov Isaacs Adobe Employee

                        Printers and designers don't update either because (1) they don't know that there is a newer version and/or (2) the font vendor doesn't make it easy to do such updates.

                         

                        I won't go arguing about licensing models.

                         

                                  - Dov