3 Replies Latest reply on May 25, 2006 1:02 PM by Newsgroup_User

    coldspring

    Level 7
      anyone using coldspring? what's the concensus so far on how stable it is,
      how useful, etc? increasing productivity, lending itself to better testing
      of coldfusion apps, etc?

      anyone finding it's just not worth the learning curve?

      all opinions most welcome.


        • 1. Re: coldspring
          Level 7
          Marc E wrote:
          > anyone using coldspring? what's the concensus so far on how stable it is,
          > how useful, etc? increasing productivity, lending itself to better testing
          > of coldfusion apps, etc?
          >
          > anyone finding it's just not worth the learning curve?
          >
          > all opinions most welcome.
          >
          >

          I'm using ColdSpring on several applications and absolutely love it.
          Even though it's still pre-1.0 I've had no problems with stability. I
          use it in conjunction with Mach-II. Here's some general opinions on it
          from my blog:
          http://mattwoodward.com/blog/index.cfm?commentID=212
          http://mattwoodward.com/blog/index.cfm?commentID=215

          Regarding your comment about lending itself to better testing of CF
          apps, ColdSpring isn't a testing framework. Not sure if that's what you
          meant.

          Learning curve is actually pretty small--once you get the hang of what
          it does, it just does its job and does it darn well.

          Matt

          --
          Matt Woodward
          mpwoodward@gmail.com
          Adobe Community Expert - ColdFusion
          • 2. Re: coldspring
            Level 7
            not really sure what i meant by the testing. i know, pretty nebulous.
            must've been drinking.

            here's what i'm wondering. with java, spring is gold. hundred times better
            than struts, and doesn't seem to be on a mission to make everything super
            complicated, which i always thought was the biggest problem with struts.
            over-java-izing it, if you follow me. Spring is much more sensible.

            but one of the things that Spring and other java frameworks attempt to solve
            is database handling, either b/c the "plumbing" of a java database
            connection is a pain in the butt, or because they want to remove sql
            entirely, via object-relational mapping, or whatever. i could do without the
            hibernate stuff, but Spring definitely makes db access almost ColdFusion
            easy (not quite, but almost). But with coldfusion, that's not a problem
            that needs to be solved. DB connectivity is braindead simple, which I like.

            My worry about some of these frameworks is that they make easy stuff
            complicated. some of the people on my team would latch on instantly. but for
            some, they'd have a really hard time. i mean, it's bad enough when half of
            your configuation is stored in the DB and you're used to just searching in
            code for what you need to fix. but to add onto that parameters and such into
            xml files, and that would seem to make things even more complicated.
            So...have you found that to be true at all? for a bunch of guys who've been
            doing straight old CF for 5 years, how would the framework "fit", as it
            were?

            thanks matt. good talk.


            "mpwoodward *ACE*" <mpwoodward@gmail.com> wrote in message
            news:e4kdi4$rsd$1@forums.macromedia.com...
            > Marc E wrote:
            >> anyone using coldspring? what's the concensus so far on how stable it is,
            >> how useful, etc? increasing productivity, lending itself to better
            >> testing of coldfusion apps, etc?
            >>
            >> anyone finding it's just not worth the learning curve?
            >>
            >> all opinions most welcome.
            >
            > I'm using ColdSpring on several applications and absolutely love it. Even
            > though it's still pre-1.0 I've had no problems with stability. I use it
            > in conjunction with Mach-II. Here's some general opinions on it from my
            > blog:
            > http://mattwoodward.com/blog/index.cfm?commentID=212
            > http://mattwoodward.com/blog/index.cfm?commentID=215
            >
            > Regarding your comment about lending itself to better testing of CF apps,
            > ColdSpring isn't a testing framework. Not sure if that's what you meant.
            >
            > Learning curve is actually pretty small--once you get the hang of what it
            > does, it just does its job and does it darn well.
            >
            > Matt
            >
            > --
            > Matt Woodward
            > mpwoodward@gmail.com
            > Adobe Community Expert - ColdFusion


            • 3. Re: coldspring
              Level 7
              Marc E wrote:
              > but one of the things that Spring and other java frameworks attempt to solve
              > is database handling, either b/c the "plumbing" of a java database
              > connection is a pain in the butt, or because they want to remove sql
              > entirely, via object-relational mapping, or whatever. i could do without the
              > hibernate stuff, but Spring definitely makes db access almost ColdFusion
              > easy (not quite, but almost). But with coldfusion, that's not a problem
              > that needs to be solved. DB connectivity is braindead simple, which I like.

              ColdSpring doesn't involve database stuff at all. The functionality of
              ColdSpring is limited to the Inversion of Control (IoC)/Dependency
              Injection capabilities of Spring and that's it. It doesn't do ORM.

              > My worry about some of these frameworks is that they make easy stuff
              > complicated. some of the people on my team would latch on instantly. but for
              > some, they'd have a really hard time. i mean, it's bad enough when half of
              > your configuation is stored in the DB and you're used to just searching in
              > code for what you need to fix. but to add onto that parameters and such into
              > xml files, and that would seem to make things even more complicated.
              > So...have you found that to be true at all? for a bunch of guys who've been
              > doing straight old CF for 5 years, how would the framework "fit", as it
              > were?

              What Spring does for you is gives you a declarative way to configure
              your object relationships, which even in a moderately complex
              application is WAY better than having to manage all the dependencies
              yourself. And thankfully ColdSpring is pretty darn easy to learn. In
              my opinion it absolutely makes managing your model 100% easier and it
              well worth the small amount of effort it takes to learn. CF 5
              developers are likely going to have a bit of a learning curve with
              making the move to OO anyway--that's going to be the big roadblock, not
              a framework like ColdSpring. Once they get OO they'll get ColdSpring,
              and it can actually make things a bit easier because they don't have to
              worry about nested dependency headaches in the object model.

              Matt
              --
              Matt Woodward
              mpwoodward@gmail.com
              Adobe Community Expert - ColdFusion