8 Replies Latest reply on Dec 13, 2016 11:31 PM by Rick Gerard

    Is exporting an After Effects Comp Quicker in Premiere Pro???

    josiahm29169243 Level 1

      I used the dynamic link to place an After Effects comp in a Premiere Pro timeline.

       

      I want to export the file using premiere pro, but when I was viewing the playback I realized that the footage was blurry?

      Premiere Pro has its playback resolution set to FULL, but the footage looks like it's set at a Quarter Resolution.

       

      So here's my 2 questions:

      1) Is exporting an After Effects Comp quicker in Premiere Pro???

      2) If I export the After Effects comp via Premiere Pro will the footage still be blurry or will it be full resolution?

       

      P.S. Also I am not looking for lossless visuals. I just want HD 1920x1080p.

       

       

      Here's some extra info just encase you need it.

      - After Effects comp uses lights, 3D, Cameras

      -The After Effects comp is 9 minutes long. 1920x1080p./ 24 frames a second

      - My labtop is an HP Envy

      -Windows 8.1

      -Processor: Intel(R) Core (TM) i7-4510U CPU @ 200GHz2.60GHz

      -Installed Memory (RAM): 12.00GB

      -System Type:  64-bit Operating System x64 based processor

      -Pen and Touch: Full Windows Touch Support with 10 Touch Points

      - GRAPHIC CARDS

             a) Intel (R) HD Graphics Family

             b) NVIDIA GeForce 840M

        • 1. Re: Is exporting an After Effects Comp Quicker in Premiere Pro???
          Dave LaRonde Level 6

          The 2017 version has a nasty habit of not defaulting to full resolution in other Adobe apps.  Make sure your comp's at full resolution before you go into PP.

          • 2. Re: Is exporting an After Effects Comp Quicker in Premiere Pro???
            Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Dave's suggestion should solve your resolution problem. You might want to consider this. Dynamic efficient for short shots with simple effects. Something like an animated lower 1/3 using live text or a simple composite involving a couple of effects. Anything that is complex and is going to use a bunch of system resources is usually better handled by using Premiere Pro's Crete AE Comp from Selected feature to get the composition started and then to render and replace the footage in Premiere Pro by rendering either in the AME or by using the Render Cue to render a good DI (digital intermediate) to a good visually lossless production format (often called a mezzanine codec) that has 10 bit or better color space. This is almost always a more efficient way to work because when you use a dynamically linked comp in Premiere Pro you will be lucky to have 1/4 of the rendering resources available that you would have if you rendered using the Render Cue and about 1/2 of the resources you would have using the AME. That's just the way it works for now. It will probably improve in the future, but for now, render and replace is usually the most efficient option for complex composites.

             

            One other suggestion, if you decide to go with the render and replace option it is often a good idea to add handles (a few extra frames at the head and tail of your shot) to the comp in AE so you have some fine tuning options back in PPro when you do the final edit.

            • 3. Re: Is exporting an After Effects Comp Quicker in Premiere Pro???
              josiahm29169243 Level 1

              Dave, are you suggesting I render the After Effects comp in full resolution in the After Effect's program first then import it into Premiere Pro?

              • 4. Re: Is exporting an After Effects Comp Quicker in Premiere Pro???
                Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                No, you make sure that your composition settings in the composition panel are set to full resolution. There is a bug that causes the renders in the media encoder to use the composition panel resolution rather than the default full resolution in the render settings.

                • 5. Re: Is exporting an After Effects Comp Quicker in Premiere Pro???
                  josiahm29169243 Level 1

                  Rick, so I should check to see if the Premiere Pro's comp settings are set to full resolution?

                  Are you suggesting I check Premiere Pro's comp settings?

                  How would I go about doing that?

                  I am not sure I understand.

                  • 6. Re: Is exporting an After Effects Comp Quicker in Premiere Pro???
                    Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    No, you are way over thinking this. The bug is in After Effects. The AME will use the composition panel resolution for rendering and it should not do that. To fix the problem set the comp resolution to full in the Composition Panel.

                    Screen Shot 2016-12-13 at 8.01.55 PM.png

                    I usually keep mine set to Auto because it's faster to work that way when navigating around in a comp. You change it from Auto or half or whatever to Full. That's all there is to it.

                     

                    Once again, if your AE comps are complex and take more than a few seconds to generate a full resolution ram preview I would render them to a production format movie and replace the dynamically linked AEP in Premiere Pro with your DI (digital intermediate). Now you are done with rendering, it's faster to work in Premiere Pro, and the final render will take a lot less time.

                     

                    If your AE comp is something simple with just a couple of effects and it will preview quickly, or if you need the live text feature for some titles then go ahead and use Dynamic Link.

                    2 people found this helpful
                    • 7. Re: Is exporting an After Effects Comp Quicker in Premiere Pro???
                      josiahm29169243 Level 1

                      OOOOOOOOOOOH, now I see. I don't know why I was so dense.

                       

                      Sometimes a visual aid and  putting things in simple terms works best for me. Forgive me haha.

                       

                      I have one final question.

                       

                      I am new to After Effects. Can you explain how I would render and After Effect comp into a  production format movie????

                      Are you telling me I should change the export setting when using the render queue or AME?

                       

                      EDIT: The reason I was trying to use Premiere is because AE's render queue and AME were taking way to long to export the file. I left my pc running for a day and it wasn't even 1/4th of the way done.

                      • 8. Re: Is exporting an After Effects Comp Quicker in Premiere Pro???
                        Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        Type rendering in the Search Help field at the top right corner of After Effects and study up on the various formats. The easiest solution is to just accept the Lossless preset in the Output Module that you will find in the render cue. This will give you a very big file that will not play back in real time on most systems but it will work just fine and a DI. The right format depends on a lot of things. One of my favorite formats right now is the Cineform codec you get when you install the GoPro Studio. It's very good at a lot of things. A completely safe option is to render an image sequence, but this requires a bit more studying and some understanding of frame rates and image sequence interpolation that you should really be setting in your preferences if you decide to go the image sequence route. Any time I have a render that takes more than about a minute a frame - not unusual in a lot of complex compositing work - I render to an image sequence because if 3 frames in the middle are fouled up I can go back and just redo those 3 frames. You can't easily do that with a movie file.

                         

                        I hope this helps. If you plan to do more than just experiment with home movies then you owe it to yourself to read up on formats and compression so you understand how video works. Video has very strict rules that you must follow to get things to work and there's way too much to know about how it all work to put in a forum thread.