4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 21, 2017 6:26 PM by wobertc

    Lightroom won't merge HDRs

    jaylaphotography

      After updating to Lightroom 2015.8 and using it for a while, Lightroom won't fully process HDR images using the 'Photo > Photo Merge > HDR' function (it did for a little bit though)

       

      After selecting the files (7 RAW files) and attempting to merge them the progress bar stops about a third in and does not continue moving.

       

      Screen Shot 2016-12-17 at 15.48.05.png

       

      I have tried merging normally through the use of the menu, by bypassing the preview (using the Shift key), and I have unchecked & checked Graphics processing in preferences with no luck.

       

      I have also tried merging a smaller amount of files - this worked only once, but after trying it again it did not want to merge the files again.

       

      Can someone tell me what I could be missing?

        • 1. Re: Lightroom won't merge HDRs
          Akash Sharma Adobe Employee

          Hi jaylaphotography,

           

          Please backup your Lightroom preferences and reset preferences following the steps below:-

           

          1. Close Lightroom

          2. Hold down [CTRL/CMD]+[Alt/Optn]+[Shift] and launch Lightroom

          3. Overwrite the preferences when prompted in the dialog.

           

          Let us know if that helps,

           

          Regards,

          Akash

          • 2. Re: Lightroom won't merge HDRs
            wobertc Adobe Community Professional

            Using seven (7) raw files seems excessive to me, and not necessary. Hard to imagine a scene that would need that extreme range of exposure.

            I reproduce these notes below as were provided in a forum post by-

            ~Rikk Flohr
            Community Manager - Adobe Systems

             

             

            HDR Exposures

            According to the engineering team - if your two exposures are three or less stops apart, (ie 0, -1.5, +1.5), a third exposure is not needed. In this case, merging the -1.5 and the +1.5 and ignoring the 0 should give you as good or better results than using all three exposures. For example, a -2/0/+2, spread is 4 stops and requires a third exposure. See the guide below.
            Under to Over optimum number of exposures:
            Up to:
            -1.5 to 1.5 = 2 exposure
            -3.0 to 3.0 = 3 exposure
            -4.5 to 4.5 = 4 exposure
            -6.0 to 6.0 = 5 exposure

            HDR/Pano Settings

            Please note that the settings that are copied over will differ between the HDR and Panorama cases.

            For a Panorama, the merge tool is changing geometric attributes, and will therefore not copy over existing geometric settings such as Lens Corrections/Upright (with the exception of Defringe settings).

            For HDR, the merge tool is expanding tonal range, so existing primary tone settings (such as Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, and Blacks) are not copied over.

            Settings cleared for both the HDR & Pano cases:
            - Local Corrections
            - Red Eye
            - Upright
            - Crop

            Settings that are copied over (with some exceptions):
            - Basic Panel (except primary tone adjustments for HDR)
            - Tone Curves (HDR no, Pano yes)
            - HSL/Color/B&W
            - Split Toning
            - Detail Panel
            - Lens Correction (HDR yes, Pano only Defringe)
            - Effects Panel
            - Camera Calibration (except Process Version, which must always be current for HDR)
            - Spot Healing (retained for Panos only)

            • 3. Re: Lightroom won't merge HDRs
              jaylaphotography Level 1

              Thanks - this is good to know.

               

              Could you provide a link to these details you have provided from Rikk Flohr?

               

              When doing multiple exposures (for landscapes) I typically shoot with 1 exposure difference, e.g. -3/-2/-1/0/+1/+2/+3, hence the 7 exposures.

               

              I suspect this is over-kill?