6 Replies Latest reply on Dec 24, 2016 7:16 AM by Ann Bens

    Transcode Before Adding Video Files To PE?

    Easy Mark

      Should I transcode my Sony XAVC S files (which is a highly compressed codec) into a less-compressed file before importing into premiere elements?

       

      I would like to optimize playback and rendering speed. However, if I use the render timeline function, the resulting timeline preview is so bad that I can't tell whether the clips need to be sharpened or need noise reduction or some other effect. The rendered timeline just looks nasty...

       

      And are you using a program for transcoding that you can recommend?

       

      Thanks in advance.

        • 1. Re: Transcode Before Adding Video Files To PE?
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Premiere Elements is designed to work natively with XAVC-S files -- so processing or converting them before bringing them into Premiere Elements might actually take you further from rather than closer to an efficient workflow.

           

          But, of course, this is assuming you've got a system capable of editing 4K video.

           

          In my books, I recommend a processor that rates at least an 8,000 for 4K editing.

          PassMark Intel vs AMD CPU Benchmarks - High End

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Transcode Before Adding Video Files To PE?
            whsprague Adobe Community Professional

            Steve is of course right.  Don't transcode.

             

            But, something else seems wrong.  You wrote, "...if I use the render timeline function, the resulting timeline preview is so bad...."

             

            Besides the question about your computer, how are you setting up the project?  If done correctly, you shouldn't see the indication that preview rendering is necessary.  Setting up the project varies with the versions of Premier Elements.  What version are you using?

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            • 3. Re: Transcode Before Adding Video Files To PE?
              Easy Mark Level 1

              Thank you both for the input.

               

              First, I should mention I am just testing out with the 15-day trial of PE 15, so maybe it is designed to render the timeline kind of ugly???

               

              My footage is: 4K XAVC S 24p 100MBS

               

              I want to export / produce to 1080p 24fps H.264 (Highest quality setting / bit rate available).

               

              I believe that PE 15 sets up the project timeline automatically if I drop a 4K 24p clip on to it first, right?

               

              my computer is:

               

              I7-3770 @ 3.4 GHz (rated 9324 at cpubenchmark.com )

              Graphics: Intel HD 4000 Graphics (rated only 451 at cpubenchmakr.com)

               

              It's a small form factor box, so I DON'T have a discrete graphics card in there. They do make some discrete graphics cards that would fit, but I think the most powerful I could put in there would be something like the GT 630 or something like the Radeon 5450 SFF

               

              I haven't seen benchmarks for Premiere elements, but it looks like for premiere PRO that if one is downsampling during export, then the GPU plays a VERY significant role. Would that be true for Elements as well? Or just Pro?

              • 4. Re: Transcode Before Adding Video Files To PE?
                whsprague Adobe Community Professional

                I've used PrE 12, 13 and now 15 to edit 4K 100Mbps footage from two Panasonic cameras on an i7 laptop.  It works.  It makes any computer work as hard as it is capable of.

                 

                The trial is the real thing.  It puts a logo on the output that can't be removed without a little work.  Performance won't improve when you buy it.  If you do buy it, there is a "holiday" discount at B&H of $30 and, outside of New York, they don't charge sales tax.  It is as good a deal as you will get until next year at this time. 

                 

                If you are going to do a lot of video with this computer, consider trying a SSD if you have a slot.  Install Premier Elements on it and use dedicated folders on it for your projects.   IMHO, the keys to best results with 4K video editing are a fast i7 processor, plenty of RAM and an SSD for the program, the project and the source files. 

                 

                Under Edit > Preferences > General there is a box to check for Intel Graphics hardware acceleration.  I'm not sure it does much, but it might.

                 

                Premier Elements 15 is well suited to produce to 1080p 24fps H.264 (Highest quality setting / bit rate available).  Output rendering will not be speedy.  Nor do I think it would be speedy on any of the other under $100 video editors. 

                 

                Premier Elements is not coded to take advantage of discrete graphics cards like the "CUDA" abilities from NVIDIA.   You could buy one, but I doubt it will provide noticeable speed improvements.  Premier Elements and Premiere Pro are not related in any way other than brand and product name.  Benchmarks for one has nothing to do with the other.

                 

                Don't take my suggestions as negative.  Unless you spend to get Premier Pro, I don't think there is a better combination of tools, ease of use, training resources and performance.  There are only a couple other real choices, but I don't think they will be any better.

                 

                What camera did you get?  I suspect it is a Sony.

                 

                Good luck with this.

                 

                Bill

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                • 5. Re: Transcode Before Adding Video Files To PE?
                  Easy Mark Level 1

                  Hi there, Bill:

                   

                  Thanks for the reply. It is very helpful.

                   

                  I have a sony a6300 that shoots 4K. It also does 1080p, but the 1080p files are not great (lots of moire). Everybody says shoot 4K and then downsample.

                   

                  I do have PE installed on an SSD, along with the OS. Maybe I need to set up scratch disks or something to make sure they are using the SSD (and there is enough room on them, the SSD is filling up fast).

                   

                  I can try to use the Graphics Acceleration checkbox, but my on-board HD 4000 GPU is so bad that it MIGHT make things worse. I will test out.

                   

                  I have been using PowerDirector by Cyberlink, which I like a lot, but the performance on my computer is pretty slow. PowerDirector IS set up to benefit from CUDA / OpenCL. I guess I just want to see if the grass is greener on the Premiere Elements side of the fence...

                   

                  I guess my other concern is in terms of (minor) grading and (as mentioned in my other thread), sharpening, since I shoot somewhat flat and was hoping that I could get better IQ by grading / adding contrast / sharpening in post.

                   

                  Do you tend to shoot flat? or do you do your contrast and sharpening in-camera?

                   

                  Which panasonic cameras do you have, and how is low light up to about 3200? I was looking at a G7 instead of the sony a6300, but I use the sony for stills as well as video, and for video, I need to shoot indoors without any extra lighting, so I think I have to shoot a lot at ISO 1600-3200

                   

                  Thanks in advance.

                  • 6. Re: Transcode Before Adding Video Files To PE?
                    Ann Bens Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    I guess my other concern is in terms of (minor) grading and (as mentioned in my other thread), sharpening, since I shoot somewhat flat and was hoping that I could get better IQ by grading / adding contrast / sharpening in post.

                    Elements is not the tool for that..

                     

                    Do you tend to shoot flat? or do you do your contrast and sharpening in-camera?

                    Which panasonic cameras do you have, and how is low light up to about  3200? I was looking at a G7 instead of the sony a6300, but I use the  sony for stills as well as video, and for video, I need to shoot indoors  without any extra lighting, so I think I have to shoot a lot at ISO  1600-3200

                    I would stick to the camera default settings.

                    IMO Lowering contrast in camera will give you less latitude in post. Same goes for sharpening especially at high iso: more noise.