8 Replies Latest reply on Feb 3, 2017 4:29 PM by JJMack

    Photoshop pdf import and save as jpg

    Heirloom Bob Level 1

      I have a file, created in inDesign and exported as a pdf. In inDesgn  CS4, the file is 4" x 2.5". I then open the pdf file in Photoshop CS5, and it's the same image size as the original inDesign image.Now I reduce the image size to 290 x 182 pixels and now the image has the jaggies, yet the imported PDF before resizing is nice and sharp. What am I doing wrong?

        • 1. Re: Photoshop pdf import and save as jpg
          Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

          InDesign can export as jpg directly, have you tried that?

          • 2. Re: Photoshop pdf import and save as jpg
            Heirloom Bob Level 1

            I never knew I could export as a jpg from InDesign. I am attaching two images. One is the original export from InDesign and the other, the reduced file size version which is reduced to 290 x 182 pixels. The smaller version doesn't look that bad here but zoomed...

            HFAD Spa Sheet Sets III Feb 2017.jpgHFAD Spa Sheet Sets III Feb 2017 290x182 Pixels.jpg

            • 3. Re: Photoshop pdf import and save as jpg
              JJMack Most Valuable Participant

              Photoshop open a PDF Page as a Pixel layer.  If you open its as a large layer then resize it to be a small layer like 290 x182 the resize will be done via interpolation  image quality will suffer badly.  Also resizing to 290 x 180 can not contain many details and if Bicubit Sharper was used and the original was sharp the jaggies will be great.

               

              On the other hand if you have Photoshop Open resize the page small to begin with  the resize will be done via vector graphics where possible.  Jaggies should not be a problem however only 290 x 182 pixels may be.

               

               

              For example 290 pixels wide form a 8.5 x 11 print resolition documet will not work in either case. In fact the interpolated look better then Photoshop open scaling.

               

               

              Capture.jpg

              Capture.jpg

              • 4. Re: Photoshop pdf import and save as jpg
                Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional
                The smaller version doesn't look that bad here but zoomed...

                Well, when you zoom in (beyond 100%) on a low resolution image like this, it will look bad.

                But I can see jpg artifacts around the the text without zooming in.

                Using a very high quality setting when you save the jpg might improve it.

                It will also look better if you save it as a PNG instead of jpg, but the file size will increase.

                InDesign CS6 and later can also save directly as PNG.

                • 5. Re: Photoshop pdf import and save as jpg
                  Heirloom Bob Level 1

                  The 290 x 182 image is for a static ad on TV so I don't need 300 dpi but I do need a sharp image.I have to give to TV as a jpg, therefore png is not an option.

                   

                  I will look at JJMACK's response  too.

                  • 6. Re: Photoshop pdf import and save as jpg
                    Heirloom Bob Level 1

                    JJMACK, so I want to be sure I have it now. I create the original using InDesgn CS4 and export as a pdf. When I open the pdf in Photoshop, at the Import PDF screen, this is where I change the Image Size to 290x182 pixels?

                    Since the image need not be any higher resolution that 72 dpi for TV, should I also change the resolution at this same screen from the 300 to 72? Does the Mode matter here? ProPhoto RGB or RGB? Leave the bit depth at 16 bit?

                    • 7. Re: Photoshop pdf import and save as jpg
                      JJMack Most Valuable Participant

                      Resolution is meaningless on the web and TV  Display display your images pixel using their pixel size not any pixels size specified by the document DPI value.  All that matters is the number of pixels. On 4k HDTV they will be 2X upsampled four HDTV  pixel will be used for each of your image's pixels how big your image display depends on the displays resolution.

                      • 8. Re: Photoshop pdf import and save as jpg
                        JJMack Most Valuable Participant

                        First you need to understand some simple basic better. You need to understand resolution better DPI.   Perhaps I can explain it better if I use Photoshop Image size dialog.   If you un-check RESAMPLE any setting you change will not change a single pixel or change the image's file size.  All that will changes the image PRINT size.  Changing any one setting will change all three setting.  If you change the width Photoshop will calculate the required DPI setting and set it and set the images height for that DPI setting.  If  set the DPI Photoshop will calculate and set the width and height.   DPI is Pixel size the pixel density.  300 dpi means there are 90,000. pixel per square inch each 1/300"x1/300"  Changing the DPI will change the size the image will print. Not a single pixel is altered added or removed.  Displays do not play the DPI game they have a fixed number of pixels that have a fixed size.  However they can display many images per second printers can not do that.  If the image is to be use one the web it should have sRGB colors.   JPEG image will be 8Bit even if you edit in 16bit mode. PNG I believe supports 16bit but most displays are 8bit displays. Some Display drivers and displays support 10bit color.  When it come to Video and TV my knowledge is not grate there are many TV  and video standards. Color would need to be handled by the encoding software.

                         

                        An image will either fit on display and fill all or part of the display area or be oversized for a display in  width,  or height or both dimensions,   Image are resized on displays by resampling the image to have a different number of pixels. That is how Photoshop zooms images. You only see the images actual pixels  when you zoom to 100%.  I know you know all of this.  I hope you understand it better now.