3 Replies Latest reply on Feb 17, 2017 1:03 AM by wobertc

    Resizing 4:3 images to 16:9

    Yoseop.Yu Level 1

      Hi guys

      I'm trying to resize some of my still images so that I can add them in a 1920*1080 video.

      My original still images are 4592*3448 4:3 ratio.

      I set the resize setting on export menu to 1920*1080 and the outcomes I get are 1438*1080.

      Why 1438?? Is it because I'm trying to resize 4:3 ratio image to 16:9??

       

      I also tried resizing it to 1440*1080 which is same 4:3 ratio but still, I get 1438*1080.

       

      Can someone please explain to me where 1438 came from?

       

      Many thanks in advance.

        • 1. Re: Resizing 4:3 images to 16:9
          Bob Somrak Level 5

          You have to first CROP in Develop to 16:9 aspect and then you can Export it as a 16:9

          • 2. Re: Resizing 4:3 images to 16:9
            JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            Trying to specify a specific dimension in the export dialog won't work if the image isn't cropped properly. You need to crop your images using the 16:9 aspect ratio setting. Then export your images specifying the long side being 1920 pixels. The resulting exported copies should work perfectly.

            • 3. Re: Resizing 4:3 images to 16:9
              wobertc Adobe Community Professional

              As general advice (for Lightroom)-

              The 'Re-size' dimension options in the export dialog should be considered as dimension "upper limits".

              Lightroom will always FIT the image within the dimensions entered in the Re-size panel- regardless of its original pixel dimensions.

               

              For the OP- the 4:3 image will have to FIT within the dimensions 1920x1080, but it will still be a 4:3 image- just re-sized down to 1440x1080.

               

              As in the posts above- For a 16:9 image, it must first be cropped to the 16:9 ratio in the Develop module crop tool. Then it can be re-sized down and will FIT (and FILL ! ) the 1920x1080 pixel dimensions.

               

              "1438" is just a slight 'glitch' in the re-size.