6 Replies Latest reply on Mar 7, 2017 5:03 AM by Ed012

    Further advice on PC Spec

    Ed012 Level 1

      Further to my recent question that ended on 22.02.2017, I have a few questions regarding a quote for a new PC. The i7-7700K quoted is at 12337 on the Passmark CPU Benchmark. I am trying to keep costs down and would like an opinion on whether that particular processor is required; the i7-6700 is at the 10000 mark.

      In the future I will add sound files to my photo and video clip combinations that have around 90 minute lengths; I didn't attempt to do so with my previous underpowered PCs.

       

      The GeForce GTX 1050 graphics card was quoted and I noted that on one of the forum posts the 1060 (6Gb) card was recommended as an upgrade; this would cost me an extra £150 but if it is superior then I will go for that one.

       

      Finally, I was considering sharing my current monitor between current and new PC but it is a 19" Flat Screen set to the recommended resolution of 1440 x 900.

      On Adobe's website the system requirements for Premiere Elements 15 is 1024 x 768 and this is one of the Supported Monitor Settings. Do you think that I should ignore this and buy a Full HD screen. I would like to learn how to calibrate the screen in order to send photos to Printing Companies and for them to be accurate.

      Can all monitors be calibrated or are there specific models to consider.

       

      sorry if I appear naive but my subject of study was painting and printmaking and to avoid a life of poverty I learned on a part time basis how to draw on computer and went on to work as a Technical Illustrator and CAD Technician. Consequently the technical side was solved by company IT departments.

      I have retired now and have more time to explore new directions.

       

      Any help will be appreciated.

        • 1. Re: Further advice on PC Spec
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          An upgraded graphics card won't give you a boost with Premiere Elements' performance, if that's what you're looking for. But that processor is certainly going to more than capable to edit just about anything!

           

          I would probably not go with a monitor that only has a 1440x900 resolution. The program really seems optimized for a monitor of about 1920x1080 -- although you could probably work with a monitor as small as 1280x1024. I would find anything less than that frustrating.

           

          As for calibrating your monitor -- it depends on how deep you want to dig a hole. There is professional color calibration equipment out there that will allow you to get your colors very precise. But computers and monitors have gotten so good lately that I don't even know professionals who do that kind of calibration.

           

          It's really not necessary for consumer video or photo editing.

          • 2. Re: Further advice on PC Spec
            whsprague Adobe Community Professional

            Steve is, as usual, right.  An HD 1920x1080 screen is a help.  Since it is video, a smaller TV with a monitor connection works for me.  I've tried using Premier Elements with the "Hardware Acceleration" on and off with only minor difference.  I don't understand it, but somehow Intel CPUs have some video code hardwired in making a nVidea type graphics card unnecessary. 

             

            What Steve did not mention is use of a SSD.  If you can put your video source files, scratch disks, preview files and output all in one folder on an SSD there is a significant improvement.   I would trade the expense of a graphics card for an SSD in a heartbeat.

            • 3. Re: Further advice on PC Spec
              Ed012 Level 1

              Good morning Steve

              I will take your advice and go for the i7-7700K but not the NVidia GTX1060 graphics; the 1500 should be adequate as the only other software I use is Photoshop Elements and I intend to upgrade to the version 15 bundle.

               

              Regarding the monitor I will buy a 1920 x 1080 monitor and send a file for printing at one of the companies reviewed in photography magazines.

               

              Bill

              I also received a recommendation for SSDs in my two quotes:

              1) SK Hynix SL301 250Gb plus a Seagate 2TB Hard Disc.

              2)  Kingston 240Gb SSDNow M.2 2280 G2 plus Seagate Firecuda 3.5 SSHD, 7200rpm.

               

              I Googled SK Hynix and some reviewers preferred the Samsung 850 Evo 256Gb. It's a minefield out there.

               

              Regarding the Seagate Firecuda the spec says that it is SSHD then 7200rpm; I thought that SSDs do not have moving parts?

              I am also assuming that the 250Gb SSD is the C: drive and the second HD is the equivalent of what would be a partitioned drive, both internal, and that the software will operate on the 250Gb SSD and the second drive can be reserved for rendering.I already have two external backup drives; I switched from film camera to digital in 2008 and have archived thousands of photos and video clips from my backpacking holidays. Can you confirm that the second hard drive will be internal and operate in a similar way to a partionioned drive?

               

              Do you use Windows 10 or is the less power hungry Windows 7 sufficient. I have version 7 Home premium, 64bit.

               

              I am almost ready to commit to the new PC so I will await your replies.

              • 4. Re: Further advice on PC Spec
                Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                Windows 10, without a doubt. It's a terrific operating system that keeps getting better, IMHO.

                • 5. Re: Further advice on PC Spec
                  whsprague Adobe Community Professional

                  Ed012  wrote

                   

                  ...........

                  Bill

                  I also received a recommendation for SSDs in my two quotes:

                  1) SK Hynix SL301 250Gb plus a Seagate 2TB Hard Disc.

                  2)  Kingston 240Gb SSDNow M.2 2280 G2 plus Seagate Firecuda 3.5 SSHD, 7200rpm.

                   

                  I Googled SK Hynix and some reviewers preferred the Samsung 850 Evo 256Gb. It's a minefield out there.

                   

                  Regarding the Seagate Firecuda the spec says that it is SSHD then 7200rpm; I thought that SSDs do not have moving parts?

                  I am also assuming that the 250Gb SSD is the C: drive and the second HD is the equivalent of what would be a partitioned drive, both internal, and that the software will operate on the 250Gb SSD and the second drive can be reserved for rendering.I already have two external backup drives; I switched from film camera to digital in 2008 and have archived thousands of photos and video clips from my backpacking holidays. Can you confirm that the second hard drive will be internal and operate in a similar way to a partionioned drive?

                   

                  Do you use Windows 10 or is the less power hungry Windows 7 sufficient. I have version 7 Home premium, 64bit.

                   

                   

                  I agree with Steve.  Windows 10 is fine.

                   

                  I can't help with SSHDs except that I know they exist.  

                   

                  My system has a 256GB SSD (C:) drive and a 1TB HDD (D:).  They are internal, separate and there are no partitions.   I install important programs on C: and less important (Word, Excel) programs on D:.  All stored documents, photos and videos are on D:.  My theory is that I save as much room as I can on the SSD C: for a dedicated video editing folder.  All rendering, preview as well as output, is contained in that dedicated folder.

                   

                  I only keep one project in the dedicated folder at a time.  When I'm done with the project I move the entire folder to the D: drive for storage.  I can move it back if I want to do more work on it.  Even the storage D: drive gets full and I'll move parts of that to an external storage drive.  (Of course everything is backed up twice.  In total, I have 6 drives!)

                   

                  A better solution for me would be to have a desktop system with about a 500 GB SSD and about a 3TB HDD with two distinct 3TB externals for double backup.  However, I'm committed to a laptop due to travel habits.

                   

                  All my photos are stored on the D: drive or one of the externals. 

                   

                  Bill

                  • 6. Re: Further advice on PC Spec
                    Ed012 Level 1

                    Steve and Bill

                    Thanks for clearing those points up. My hard drive has the usual C: drive with D: drive partition and I also use C: for programs and D: for documents and image files. So the first and second SSDs can be used in the same way. I will also set up a dedicated rendering folder on the C;drive as you recommended.

                     

                    Regards.