2 Replies Latest reply on Mar 7, 2017 2:27 PM by MikeGondek

    Struggling with Publishing company's printing specs

    elizabethh89637367

      I have created a full page ad for my company and submitted it to the publishing magazine, but they have quiet a few specifications that I cannot wrap my head around.

       

      I have everything settled for a full page ad (margins bleeds etc) the only thing I am truly struggling with is how to change the image to DEVICE DEPENDENT COLORS with NO ICC PROFILES.

       

      I have to be honest, I am VERY new to photoshop and the whole specs/data behind creating something is beyond me at the moment. I plan on educating myself very soon but in the meantime, could anyone explain to me what this all means and how to change it? Your knowledge is very much appreciated!

        • 1. Re: Struggling with Publishing company's printing specs
          D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          elizabethh89637367  wrote

           

          the only thing I am truly struggling with is how to change the image to DEVICE DEPENDENT COLORS with NO ICC PROFILES.

           

          That sounds cryptic, but is actually pretty standard procedure if you are asked to provide a press-ready PDF.

           

          But it gives no meaning unless they also give you a specific CMYK profile to convert to. This is crucial. That CMYK profile is the device dependent color - the profile describes the actual press conditions (press/paper/ink).

           

          A press-ready PDF is traditionally prepared to the PDF/X-1a standard, a sort of common denominator that minimizes any risk. You can use other PDF/X standards, but then you need to know what you're doing. Anyway - PDF/X-1a does just that, it converts to the specified CMYK profile, but then strips the profile itself.

           

          The reason for this is that many older RIPs choked on icc profiles, and many probably still do. So they usually don't want embedded profiles. It doesn't really matter if the profile is there or not, as long as the data has been converted to the correct profile. Then the numbers will conform with what actually happens on press.

           

          In case of any doubt, the PDF states "output intent". That's the profile.

           

          So - get the right CMYK profile, and export to PDF/X-1a.

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          • 2. Re: Struggling with Publishing company's printing specs
            MikeGondek Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            First check if a profile is assigned. Change the arrow in the booth left to document profile. Mine says I have US web Coated SWOP v2

             

            Screen Shot 2017-03-07 at 4.24.33 PM.png

             

            to get rid of the profile

            Edit >> Assign Profile >> don't color manage this document

             

             

            Screen Shot 2017-03-07 at 4.23.01 PM.png

             

             

            Device dependent colors only place I now of is when you print. Printer manages color.

             

             

             

             

            Screen Shot 2017-03-07 at 4.27.00 PM.png

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