2 Replies Latest reply on Mar 21, 2017 8:19 AM by D Fosse

    Settings and Adjustments

    craigo60616

      I take a lot of pictures of broken glass. However, when the picture comes out you can barely tell it's broken.

      Many times it just looks like dirty glass or whatever. Since technically glass is "see-through" its very hard to get pictures that look right.

      I am trying to show the dramatic effect it has when a house has broken glass, but when I take pics it just looks like no big deal.

      Are there any settings or adjustments I can make in Lightroom that would make the broken shards of glass really pop?

      I am inserting a couple pics here to demonstrate what I am talking about.

      broken-1391025_640.jpg

       

      This first picture is obviously edited so you can see the dramatic effect of the glass, but the second one, I took, you can barely tell the glass is shattered.

      20170320_133447.jpg

      I have more pics available on my site www.glassreplacements.com

      I look forward to hearing any suggestions.

        • 1. Re: Settings and Adjustments
          D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Two things: Lighting and background.

           

          The most effective light for this comes from the sides/back of the glass. And then you need a background that isn't too busy (a long telephoto lens wide open will help you with that).

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Settings and Adjustments
            D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            It struck me that this is pretty similar to shooting engraved glass, which I've been doing a bit of.

             

            The main light sources here are behind the glass, just outside the image frame.That's the broad stripe of reflection running along the sides. In normal front light, the engraving would be almost indistinguishable:

            glass_1.jpg

            The point is to think in terms of shooting light conditions, not what you can do in Lightroom.

             

            If you want to explore this in depth, you might look into using portable flash units, remotely triggered, and placed hidden from view. Could be an interesting project.