2 Replies Latest reply on Jun 2, 2017 5:14 AM by Rick Gerard

    Warp Stabilizer VFX won't work

    carlk6349286

      Hi

      I'm using After Effects CC (2017), and I'm trying to stabilize a hyperlapse which's a jpeg sequence. All the pictures are of course in jpeg format, and I'm trying to make the timelapse in 24p, which I match in the composition that i'm using. But every time i use the effect 'Warp Stabilizer VFX', and after a short period, it tells me, that it's "Unable to acquire rendered frame". It would be nice if anyone could help me, because i have tried a lot, but can't seem to find the solution.

      Thanks in advance.

        • 1. Re: Warp Stabilizer VFX won't work
          Mylenium Most Valuable Participant

          Nobody can tell you anything without exact system info or other technical details like comp settings. Start by flushing your caches.

           

          Mylenium

          • 2. Re: Warp Stabilizer VFX won't work
            Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            There are two obvious sources of your problem. First, huperlapse or time-lapse images can easily have enough differences between the frames as things move to foul up the calculations required to warp stabilize footage. This is an extremely common problem. The second thing that may be going on is that you are using images that are just too large for your system to handle. If you shot the time-lapse (hyper lapse implies some kind of stabilization) with a still camera and the frame size is significantly larger than HD or 4K then it's pretty easy to overwhelm a system.

             

            The solution for the second problem is to use Lightroom or Photoshop and batch process the sequence to a smaller image size. You could even use the Adobe Media Encoder to get your image sequence somewhere close to the final frame size for your project.

             

            The solution to the first problem is usually to re-shoot with less time between exposures so the calculations are not completely thrown off by the differences between frames.