8 Replies Latest reply on Jun 4, 2017 12:08 PM by gener7

    How to publish a png to 300 dpi in Photoshop

    Kodiak211

      I'm wanting to print t-shirt designs. I need a 300 dpi resolution, and I need the background to be transparent.

        • 1. Re: How to publish a png to 300 dpi in Photoshop
          Terri Stevens Adobe Community Professional

          I don't produce t-shirts but I'm pretty sure you don't need resolutions as high as 300dpi as the ink bleeds into the fabric and reduces the resolution. 120-150dpi would be closer to the mark I'd guess, but there are plenty of people here who know exactly how the process works so I'll leave the details to them.

          • 2. Re: How to publish a png to 300 dpi in Photoshop
            melissapiccone Adobe Community Professional

            I save png files at 300 ppi all the time - for digital scrapbooking. Just create your images at the size you want and save them... I guess I don't understand the problem... just turn off any background layers so you see the transparency in PS and save as a png...

            • 3. Re: How to publish a png to 300 dpi in Photoshop
              Kodiak211 Level 1

              Ok, I have done that. But when I check the file properties of the png, after it's published. It actually doesn't give me any information about the dpi. But when I publish it as a jpeg, it has a dpi of 92 I believe. Even tho i have my canvas set to 300dpi in Photoshop before publishing.

              • 4. Re: How to publish a png to 300 dpi in Photoshop
                Kodiak211 Level 1

                I'm only assume, that because the jpeg publishes in a dpi of 96, then so is the png publishing in a dpi of 96.

                 

                However, when I use scripts to publish my work, under the properties, it's 300 dpi. But can't publish a PNG using scripts.

                 

                How else can you check the dpi of a PNG? Maybe using gimp or something?

                • 5. Re: How to publish a png to 300 dpi in Photoshop
                  D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  If you're using Export or Save For Web, the resolution metadata are discarded, so that the file doesn't have a resolution at all. This is because resolution is moot for screen. The application you reopen the file into, may then assign its own default ppi value. Some assign 72, others 96 or some other value.

                   

                  But none of this really matters. What matters is that you have enough pixels for the intended resolution at the intended size. If you open the Image Size dialog - with "resample image" UNchecked!!! - just type in the intended resolution and see if the resulting print size is sufficient.

                   

                  It's important to realize that ppi, pixels per inch, is not a native property of the file. It's just metadata, and it can be changed arbitrarily without affecting the file. Just stop and consider what pixels per inch means. That little formula is the key.

                   

                  All that said, cotton fabric can not possibly resolve as high as 300 ppi. I'd say 150 at the most, more likely 100.

                  • 6. Re: How to publish a png to 300 dpi in Photoshop
                    Kodiak211 Level 1

                    According to some of my research, 300 dpi is the lest amount you should use for printing t-shirts. Here's a tutorial on it. Image Size/Format Guide | Print Aura - DTG Printing Services

                    • 7. Re: How to publish a png to 300 dpi in Photoshop
                      melissapiccone Adobe Community Professional

                      just open it up in PS again to check the ppi...

                      • 8. Re: How to publish a png to 300 dpi in Photoshop
                        gener7 Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        https://forums.adobe.com/people/D+Fosse  wrote

                         

                        All that said, cotton fabric can not possibly resolve as high as 300 ppi. I'd say 150 at the most, more likely 100.

                         

                        As I understand it, the 300 ppi figure is so the printer can make color separations.

                         

                        "Traditional T-shirt printing is done by silk screen, which technically has a varying resolution called “mesh”, the density of the threads. You might see a typical mesh density of 110 or 156 threads per inch, but this isn’t terribly important to the final output of the image because the ink will flow through the threads and become a solid layer on the garment. The only time it is important to use 156 mesh is if there are a lot of very fine details in the image.

                         

                        If you only have a raster image to start with for your T-shirt printing project, then it is ideal to have it at 300 DPI, simply because it needs to have enough resolution for the printer to create color separations. These are selections of each individual color that will go into screen preparation, since screen printing for T-shirts is done one color at a time.

                         

                        Because the artwork for screen printing is color separated, it is much better to use a vector image to begin with, to make the color separation process go more smoothly, but it’s not terribly difficult to get separations from a raster image if it doesn’t have too many colors involved."