2 Replies Latest reply on Aug 25, 2017 5:29 AM by davidarbor

    What is this color correction

    brhhc72153334

      Hello, a week ago i've seen a very great color correction and i tried to reproduce it but i could not get any thing satisfying.

       

      raw clip (the clips are the same they are just not in the same angle)

       

      There is an other exemple of the same color correction :

       

      raw clip :

       

      Color corrected :

       

       

      Thnaks a lot for your answer i'll keep trying but i'm running of ideas to get this right. Thanks for your time

        • 1. Re: What is this color correction
          martinr84659894 Level 3

          For a sufficient color correction, you need RAW-, LOG-, or Uncompressed source footage. Usually 12 or 14 bit. Your example-shots looks like TV-images and if those are from some youtube video, you are wasting your time, trying to cc anything.

           

          One of the best tools for CC might by DaVinci Resolve. It's free, it's fast, it's professional! I wouldn't go with AE for that.

           

          Cheers,

          *Martin

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: What is this color correction
            davidarbor Adobe Community Professional

            That's a bit of an oversimplification. You don't need RAW, LOG, or Uncompressed footage. Plus, SLRs record 14-bit RAW images, not cinema cameras. 10-bit RAW in-camera (and some can do 12-bit) is more realistic. And this was a live sporting event, so you can be sure that it wasn't being shot in RAW, LOG, or Uncompressed, color graded, downsampled, and then broadcast.

             

            That being said, yes, if you're nabbing these off of YouTube you're not going to have an flexibility with the footage, but the real answer to your question is that you need more practice. There's no magic formula for color grading, and nobody can look at these screenshots and tell you exactly what sliders to change because there are too many other unknowns aside from the technicals (lighting conditions, for example).

             

            It's also difficult to tell what you're actually working with. You have a clip that you like the look of (is that the top screenshot?) but then you're trying to match the look from different shots in the same clip?

            1 person found this helpful