5 Replies Latest reply on Aug 28, 2017 3:44 PM by beneditoc75676250

    Video card not in list of recommended fro Adobe Premiere

    beneditoc75676250 Level 1

      Hello everybody. I need to buy a new vídeo card for my computer. I mainly use Adobe products, no games. There is a list of recommended video cards for Premiere on the Adobe site, but the question is this: if I bought a video card that is not in that list, how do I make sure it is suitable for Premiere?

       

      Since my budget is very limited, I thought of buying a Radeon HD6570 or an AMD R7 240, but these not appear in that list. Buying one of these cards can I be 100% sure that Premiere can use them and that the various video effects can run faster? Which feature should I have a video card to be compatible with Adobe Premiere?Thank you.

        • 1. Re: Video card not in list of recommended fro Adobe Premiere
          Bill Gehrke Most Valuable Participant

          What numeric version of Premiere Pro do you have? --latest is never valid

          What version OS do you have

           

          Strongly consider the GTX 1050 as it will give you much more GPU Acceleration. But if that is too expensive the GT 1030 would be my recommendation.  Those low end AMD cards would be a lousy choice.   For the Premiere Pro GPU acceleration the number of CUDA cores and the memory clock/memory bandwidth are the determining factors.

           

          The HD6570 is vintage 2011 card and there is no way I could find that it ever worked for GPU Acceleration

          • 2. Re: Video card not in list of recommended fro Adobe Premiere
            RjL190365 Level 5

            I second Bill. Not only is the HD 6570 six years old now, but either of those two GPUs that you're considering are so weak even with OpenCL GPU acceleration "working" that you might as well permanently lock Premiere Pro to the MPE software-only mode (no GPU acceleration whatsoever outside of what minimal features offered by OpenGL). And while the GDDR5 versions of either GPU are poor for GPU acceleration, their DDR3 siblings are even worse. In other words, between those two you would have had to choose between terrible and abysmal. Both of those AMD GPUs are, if anything, slower than even the integrated Intel IGP that's in its newer Skylake and Kaby Lake mainstream CPUs.

             

            By the way, what are the components inside the rest of your computer (and you need to be very specific about those)? I'm asking this because it is highly likely that the components are so old that they may not run Premiere Pro correctly anyway.

             

            Randall

            • 3. Re: Video card not in list of recommended fro Adobe Premiere
              beneditoc75676250 Level 1

              Thank you for the reply. So let's forget the Radeon HD6570. And if I bought a Radeon RX 550? The Nvidia GT 1030 has a similar price (I live in Brazil). Do you think between these two video cards what is the best one?

               

              As I said I still have to make my new computer. I'm thinking of buying a Ryzen 3 1300X (the Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 here cost too much), 8 GB DDR4 2400, mainboard Asus PRIME A320 (I already have an SSD and two HDs).

               

              Thanks again for the answer.

              • 4. Re: Video card not in list of recommended fro Adobe Premiere
                RjL190365 Level 5

                I think that you should rethink your choice of a CPU: Although that R3 1300X is a decent choice if you're on a strict budget, the system that's built around that CPU is priced too close to those of typical Intel i5 builds for its own good (and yes, I am thinking the total cost of all of the parts and labor going into your build, not just the CPU and/or GPU). And from the preliminary benchmarks that I saw, the 1300X is actually less powerful in performance (read: "slower") than even the slowest recent Intel i5 CPU. With such relatively lousy performance numbers across a wide range of apps, you might as well get only a dual-core CPU for that budget.

                 

                And whichever CPU and platform that you choose, DO NOT skimp on the power supply (PSU)! You may see really cheap "high-wattage" ("600-700W" advertised rating) PSUs in your country, their REAL power handling capacity is only about 250 to 300 watts. And when you try pulling any sort of draw, these cheapies may explode into flames, possibly destroying some or all of the critical components of your new build. And such damage is not covered at all by any manufacturers' warranties.

                • 5. Re: Video card not in list of recommended fro Adobe Premiere
                  beneditoc75676250 Level 1

                  Unfortunately, the i5 costs too much for my small budget. I can get to an i3 6100, but I do not think it's a good choice. The Ryzen is a quad-core and has a good speed considering the price. But as I said I still have to do the PC and I still have to choose the various components. As for the PSU I think I can buy a 500w Corsair.