5 Replies Latest reply on Aug 30, 2017 1:07 PM by rob day

    printing with colour matching:perceptual.

    terjeb92583377

      when I print a file from photoshop(using the plugin for canon ipf 9400 or printstudio pro for pro 4000) using colour matching method: perseptual. Will the result be exactly the same every time i print?The out of gammut colours (as i understand) wil be adjustet to a colour that is printable, but.... does photoshop choose the same "substitute" colour every time i do a new print???Im working in prophoto 60+ colour space.

       

      Best Herman

        • 1. Re: printing with colour matching:perceptual.
          D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          This is based on lookup tables in the print profile, so in principle they should always match.

           

          Whether they always do in practice I don't know. There is some murky non-linear behavior in the blue/purple area, where purples shift towards blue as they are remapped inwards. This has something to do with perceptual non-uniformity in CIE XYZ vs. RGB (XYZ is a common profile connection space in color management operations). I don't know the details.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: printing with colour matching:perceptual.
            terjeb92583377 Level 1

            Thank you!Do you think this could be more of an issue working with a big colour space(prophoto 60+)? Some colours have to be remapped inwards quite a bit.

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: printing with colour matching:perceptual.
              D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Well, it depends on the image. If most of it is contained within Adobe RGB anyway, there's little reason to use ProPhoto at all.

               

              I'm perhaps a bit biased here. I personally think ProPhoto is way overrated and I don't like it for a lot of reasons - one of them is that you never actually need it. Anything beyond Adobe RGB is very likely a processing artifact, not a "real" color that reflects the real world in any meaningful way. Those colors are really, really neon-saturated.

               

              If that's how it comes out of the raw processor, ProPhoto may be useful just to contain it all without premature clipping. It can take a little work to get it all into, say, Adobe RGB.

               

              Soft-proof to the print profile and see if it looks acceptable. If there's a lot of clipping, you'll see it - clipped areas have an unpleasantly dense appearance with most of the texture obliterated. A little clipping may not matter much.

               

              To get the most out of soft proofing you should have a monitor that covers most of the printer gamut - IOW a wide gamut model. With a standard monitor everything you see is already clipped to sRGB anyway.

               

              All of this is just my personal opinion. To some people ProPhoto is sacred, and I'll get a lot of angry replies I'm sure.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: printing with colour matching:perceptual.
                rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                but.... does photoshop choose the same "substitute" colour every time i do a new print???

                I don't think it could happen with internal conversions, so if you are seeing it in print the problem is likely with the printer software. It would be easy enough to test Photoshop's conversion consistency—convert the same out-of-gamut color multiple times into a smaller space and see if there's ever a value difference.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: printing with colour matching:perceptual.
                  rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  To some people ProPhoto is sacred, and I'll get a lot of angry replies I'm sure.

                  In general I agree, but I think there are (unusual) cases where ProPhoto might have an advantage. Gamuts go both ways, so if you look at a larger CMYK space like Coated GRACol there are colors (around 100% cyan) that are outside of AdobeRGB but inside of ProPhoto RGB, and that will show up in certain conversions.

                   

                  If I try and make a perceptual conversion from AdobeRGB into GRACol it is impossible to get to 100|0|0|0 cyan. The color always gets clipped to less than 90% or MY contaminants get added. Because the entire GRAcol gamut is inside of ProPhoto RGB I can find a ProPhoto RGB color that will convert to 100% cyan without being clipped.

                   

                  cyanpro.png

                   

                  There's no hue saturation adjustment I can make to get this AdobeRGB conversion over 90% and keep 0%MYK

                   

                  cyanadobe.png

                  1 person found this helpful