4 Replies Latest reply on Aug 11, 2008 1:50 PM by Newsgroup_User

    How is this rotation done?

    Level 7
      Hi there.

      I need to learn how this rotation was done:

      http://www.steves-digicams.com/2003_reviews/cd500_qtvr.html

      A year or so ago someone said it was done by taking ± 8 photos or so and
      then use flash or something else to do this.

      I will really appreciate it if there is someone who can help me out.

      Regards,
      Deon
        • 1. Re: How is this rotation done?
          Shandy Elliott Level 1
          A year or so ago your question was answered, but ideally, for a smooth effect, you should take about 24 photos (every 15 degrees). Of course you can get away with less, but every 15 degrees is high quality. Then, you would import all the images onto the time line (if you name all the images as a sequence [image1.jpg, image2.jpg, etc] you can chose to import the first image to the stage), then Flash will ask you if you want to import the whole series. Flash will automatically place all the images on the time line properly. Then you can export as a quicktime movie. I haven't done this in a while, so I'm sure you will have to place a stop action on the first frame. I don't think you would have to incorporate additional code, but don't quote me on that.
          • 2. Re: How is this rotation done?
            Level 7
            >> A year or so ago someone said it was done by taking
            >> ± 8 photos or so and then use flash or something else
            >> to do this.

            The rotation in the URL you posted is done in QuickTime. (You can tell
            because of the QuickTime logo while the file loads and the context menu when
            you right-click (Ctrl-click) the display.

            > then Flash will ask you if you want to import the whole
            > series. Flash will automatically place all the images on the
            > time line properly. Then you can export as a quicktime
            > movie.

            Flash will indeed let you export as a Flash movie, but what you end up
            with is a linear file -- just a video that plays from start to finish, not
            something you can click-and-drag to seemingly rotate. To pull off the
            rotation illusion, you'll need some ActionScript.

            This should give you a good start:

            http://www.communitymx.com/content/article.cfm?cid=8F0CA

            It covers AS2 and a quick overview of the same approach in AS3. This
            article is the first in a series, and the rest of the series is
            pay-by-subscription, but the first article is free, and complete enough to
            give you a functioning click-and-rotate Flash movie.


            David Stiller
            Co-author, Foundation Flash CS3 for Designers
            http://tinyurl.com/2k29mj
            "Luck is the residue of good design."

            I haven't done this in a while, so I'm sure you
            > will have to place a stop action on the first frame. I don't think you
            > would
            > have to incorporate additional code, but don't quote me on that.
            >


            • 3. Re: How is this rotation done?
              Level 7
              "Shan-Dysigns" <shandy@shan-dysigns.com> wrote in
              news:g7l9dh$nk3$1@forums.macromedia.com:

              > A year or so ago your question was answered,

              Hi there, Shan.

              Thanx for your reply. Yes, I know it was answered but I couldn't find the
              help I got. I was able to download (or someone sent it to me) a Flash file
              with everything, I just sort of had to put my own images in. Thats the
              reason for me asking again.

              Thanx for your reply.
              Deon
              • 4. Re: How is this rotation done?
                Level 7
                "David Stiller" <stiller@quip-remove-.net> wrote in
                news:g7o16r$ndn$1@forums.macromedia.com:

                >>> A year or so ago someone said it was done by taking
                >>> ± 8 photos or so and then use flash or something else
                >>> to do this.
                >
                > The rotation in the URL you posted is done in QuickTime. (You can
                > tell
                > because of the QuickTime logo while the file loads and the context
                > menu when you right-click (Ctrl-click) the display.
                >
                >> then Flash will ask you if you want to import the whole
                >> series. Flash will automatically place all the images on the
                >> time line properly. Then you can export as a quicktime
                >> movie.
                >
                > Flash will indeed let you export as a Flash movie, but what you
                > end up
                > with is a linear file -- just a video that plays from start to finish,
                > not something you can click-and-drag to seemingly rotate. To pull off
                > the rotation illusion, you'll need some ActionScript.
                >
                > This should give you a good start:
                >
                > http://www.communitymx.com/content/article.cfm?cid=8F0CA
                >
                > It covers AS2 and a quick overview of the same approach in AS3.
                > This
                > article is the first in a series, and the rest of the series is
                > pay-by-subscription, but the first article is free, and complete
                > enough to give you a functioning click-and-rotate Flash movie.
                >
                >
                > David Stiller
                > Co-author, Foundation Flash CS3 for Designers
                > http://tinyurl.com/2k29mj
                > "Luck is the residue of good design."
                >
                > I haven't done this in a while, so I'm sure you
                >> will have to place a stop action on the first frame. I don't think
                >> you would
                >> have to incorporate additional code, but don't quote me on that.
                >>
                >
                >

                Thanx David. I will start straight away. This slooks like what I need.

                Regards,
                Deon