5 Replies Latest reply on Jan 20, 2018 4:06 AM by c.pfaffenbichler

    How to transfer a style, fill or adjustment layer to another document

    (d) Level 1

      I have a file with an RGB image to which I've applied several fx and filter layers. Black & white, and Gradient.

       

      See the screen grab below.

      Screen Shot 2018-01-18 at 3.57.45 PM.png

       

      I need to have the same visual, but in CMYK, at a different DPI, and at a smaller size, but not an identical aspect ratio.

       

      I'm not clear whether I should A) convert the RGB to CMKY, then resize the doc, or B) create a new CMYK file at the new dimensions, import the same source photo (layer Background in screen grab), and transfer the layers over. (I could also simply redo similar layers on the new doc, but I'm having a hard time recreating the same effects, as I can't find where the settings are detailed.)

       

      For option A

      When I try to convert  RGB to CMYK, an alert says it won't be able to transfer one of the layers due to the change. I assume this is the Black & White effect because that one isn't available in CMYK files.

       

      So if I lose that layer, then it doesn't solve my problem.

       

      For option B

      I've created a CMYK file with the new dimensions and dpi, and imported the source photo. All good there.

       

      To bring the fx and adjustment layers over from the RGB file, I read an article stating to create a duplicate of each layer in the RGB file, and send it to the new CMYK file. However, the new document doesn't show up as an option. I'm assuming because of the different formatting.

       

      So not sure if it's doable or not, but I'd like to be able to get the RGB file look to a CMYK file with minimal loss to image quality.

       

      Any suggestions on the best way to do this would be greatly appreciated.

      doug

        • 1. Re: How to transfer a style, fill or adjustment layer to another document
          c.pfaffenbichler Level 9
          I have a file with an RGB image to which I've applied several fx and filter layers.

          There are no Filter Layers available in Photoshop as of CC 2018, you probably meant »Adjustment Layers«.

           

          So not sure if it's doable or not, but I'd like to be able to get the RGB file look to a CMYK file with minimal loss to image quality.

          RGB and CMYK are different Color Modes, the hope that all effects achievable in RGB must be achievable in CMYK (in a similarly simple fashion at least) is unfounded.

          • 2. Re: How to transfer a style, fill or adjustment layer to another document
            (d) Level 1

            Thank you for the input on Filter Layer vs Adjustment Layer. I think I have PS CC 2017, so not sure if it still applies, as you mentioned 2018.

             

            I do realize RGB is different from CMYK, and am just looking for the most effective way to make the transfer. None of the material I've read has covered which of the two options I mentioned would be the best method.

            • 3. Re: How to transfer a style, fill or adjustment layer to another document
              davescm Adobe Community Professional

              The adjustment layers in CC2017 and CC2018 are the same.

              The black and white adjustment layer is the problem - it is not available in CMYK. so try this:

               

              1. Save your document with a new name (so you are working on a copy)

              2. Select the image and B&W adjustment layers and then right click and click merge layers. This will leave you with a black and white image and a gradient map above it

              3. Edit > Convert to Profile and choose the appropriate CMYK profile (it is important to choose the correct profile as there is no such thing as generic CMYK, if you don't know which profile then do not convert to CMYK until you do) . In the dialogue uncheck "Flatten Image to Preserve appearance"

              4. You will see a colour change as the strong red and blue in your image are likely to be out of the gamut (i.e range of colours) in CMYK. You may therefore want to adjust the gradient colors for the best effect with colours available in your CMYK gamut.

               

              Dave

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: How to transfer a style, fill or adjustment layer to another document
                (d) Level 1

                Thank you, Dave. That's very helpful. I'll check with the printer on which CMYK setting to choose.

                • 5. Re: How to transfer a style, fill or adjustment layer to another document
                  c.pfaffenbichler Level 9
                  Thank you for the input on Filter Layer vs Adjustment Layer. I think I have PS CC 2017, so not sure if it still applies, as you mentioned 2018.

                  In the context of Photoshop Filters and Adjustments are two different things and have been probably been since version 1.

                  While, as I understand, any Adjustment could be expressed as a Filter not so the other way round.

                  Adjustments apply changes on a pixel to pixel basis – the neighbouring pixels do not influence the result for any one pixel.

                  Filters on the other hand can change the appearance of one pixel based on not just that one’s values but based on a number of other pixels’.

                   

                  One work-around to maintain edibility for an RGB Adjustment Layer in a CMYK file is to convert the base Layer and the Adjustment Layer to a Smart Object together before converting to CMYK and making changes, if necessary, in the SO.

                   

                  An image to illustrate a principal difference of RGB and CMYK layered images:

                  RgbEffectChangedInCmyk.jpg

                  Even the Feathered edge of a plain colored Layer against a black background appears differently in the two color modes because CMYK lacks a true black (registration color would be inadmissible for printing in most cases and might appear warmish).

                  On a 0/0/0/100 background the effect looks even worse.

                  1 person found this helpful