1 Reply Latest reply on Feb 14, 2018 11:48 AM by jeromiec83223024

    Flash Game Download

    matthews5445759 Level 1

      Hello

       

      I have followed instructions online (google / youtube etc) on how to download a flash game so it can be played offline, and I have managed to download the .swf file to my PC.

      When I launch the downloaded file the game starts and I get the main page of the game, however when I select one of the sub games form the menu all I get is a blue background of the game, and nothing else. It is as if I haven't downloaded the full flash file.

      Any help would be truly appreciated as I do not know what else to try and although I am sure I am following the correct procedures I am obviously doing something wrong.

       

      Thank you for your help

       

      Game link below:

      https://www.dfs.de/dfs_karriereportal_2016/de/Fluglotse%20werden/Auswahlverfahren/main.swf

        • 1. Re: Flash Game Download
          jeromiec83223024 Adobe Employee

          Yeah, it's pretty likely that there are a bunch of assets you need, and not just the main SWF.  Even then, you're dependent on the content being written in a way where it will find those assets in the adjacent folder, and not always go out to the Internet for them.

           

          It's *also* the case that when running Flash content from the local filesystem, it's possible for malicious content to leak data back out to the network.  For this reason, we disable running content from the local filesystem by default, when running in the browser with current Flash Player versions.  It's also the case that most browsers won't just let you drag a SWF from the local filesystem into the browser anymore.  I generally recommend that people run a local webserver instead of trying to just run the content from the filesystem, for numerous reasons.

           

          So, can you do this?  Maybe.  It's not going to be trivial, and depends completely on how the content was authored.  You'll have to do some reverse-engineering.

           

          At minimum, you'll probably need to use your browser's developer tools or another debugging proxy to identify all of the assets required when the game is operating, retrieve them individually and put them in the appropriate directory structure.  At that point, if you're lucky, the game will load everything from relative paths and work normally.  If it's relying on multiple servers on the backend, it gets more complicated.