5 Replies Latest reply on Feb 15, 2018 9:56 PM by MediaManDan

    Resizing

    johnnywyoming Level 1

      A local car dealer asked me to take a photo of their building to use for an ad in a movie theater. I was told by the tech who puts the ad together that size wise the image should be 26 inches by 15 inches at 300 dpi or better. I shot the building in RAW, processed it and saved as a .tif. At that dimension the file size is 192 mb. Seems really large to me... pixel wise it is 7800 pixels wide and 4440 in height. Does this sound right? How would I send this via email??

        • 1. Re: Resizing
          JJMack Most Valuable Participant

          First the car dealer need a better tech rep there is no reason a image printed 26" by 15" has to have 300dpi resolution.  I would bet that a 200DPI print would be very acceptable.

          • 2. Re: Resizing
            johnnywyoming Level 1

            I think this will be projected onto the screen.

            • 3. Re: Resizing
              JJMack Most Valuable Participant

              You do not project a 300dpi print and the largest 4k display still only displays 3840x2160 pixels an  larger commercial displays if they displayed more pixels would most like upscale 4k content.

              • 4. Re: Resizing
                Conrad C Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                johnnywyoming  wrote

                saved as a .tif. At that dimension the file size is 192 mb. Seems really large to me... pixel wise it is 7800 pixels wide and 4440 in height. Does this sound right?

                When you save as .tif, some options should come up, including compression. Was that 192MB with any compression option turned on? LZW compression is commonly supported and should take much less space than uncompressed TIFF. The ZIP compression option can shrink down a TIFF image even more. Try both and see which works better.

                 

                I agree with what JJMack said about the pixel dimensions and resolution. If it's going to be projected, the pixel dimensions don't need to be any larger than what the dealer's projector can handle. There are no affordable projectors than can show 7800 x 4440 pixels.

                 

                johnnywyoming  wrote

                How would I send this via email??

                You don't send files this large as an email attachment. Many email services won't even take a file that large. What everybody does with files this large is use a file sharing service, such as Dropbox, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or Creative Cloud Files. For example, if you have a Dropbox account, you upload the TIFF file there, have Dropbox generate a file sharing link for you, and you paste that link into the email you send to your rep. The rep gets your email, clicks the link, and downloads it directly from Dropbox. That's pretty much how it works for all of those services. In fact, the rep may already have a file sharing service that his company uses to receive client uploads; if he does, get the instructions for uploading your file directly there.

                • 5. Re: Resizing
                  MediaManDan Level 1

                  I'm pretty sure he meant to say "72 dpi" because 26 x 15 inches is almost exactly 1920 x 1080 which makes sense for a movie theater projector.