6 Replies Latest reply on May 24, 2018 6:03 AM by Glitchdog

    Keyword challenges

    Glitchdog Level 1

      We have just interviewed several dozen people for a number of different videos to be edited over the next 8 months. Not something we normally do.

       

      I was trying to figure out the best way to organize, tag, keyword the various subjects addressed in each interview. I found some good comments on this forum and elsewhere on the web. But not the best solution. I think I'm missing something.

       

      https://forums.adobe.com/message/8548767#8548767

      https://www.premiumbeat.com/blog/power-of-metadata-in-premiere-pro/

       

      I've created my own internal Schema in meta logging for these projects/footage. So just a meta tag that is "Keywords" using text. So I have added keywords like: female, male, donor, thank, emotive, member, etc. All this to help me search quickly in Premiere.

       

      I see two problems with this approach, so maybe I have indeed missed something. 1. these key words have to be typed in each time, so there is a greater margin for error, as opposed to having fixed keywords that I can just select for each interview clip. 2. The search is not on a full word. Like searching for "male" also includes "female".

       

      What am I missing and what would be a better workflow for organizing many interviews by keyword/subject? Thanks!

        • 1. Re: Keyword challenges
          Meg The Dog Adobe Community Professional

          Are you using the "Find" command (menu Edit>Find)?

          Screen Shot 2018-04-20 at 10.47.05 AM.png

          Select the Project Panel and try the Find command.

          MtD

          • 2. Re: Keyword challenges
            Glitchdog Level 1

            Thank you for responding! No, actually I was using the search command at the top left of the bin. I realize it only searches that bin, so I created one bin with all the interviews.

             

            In the menu (Edit>Find) I do not have "Keyword" as an option in the dropdown.

             

            However, my main challenge is trying to find out the best way to organize many interviews so I can easily search by keyword or subject. Each interviewee is being asked multiple questions that will be used in a number of different videos. I want keywords or subjects attached to each clip so I can easily find them when I get to that video project. Sometimes I would need to search on multiple keywords like: "donor, thank, emotive"

             

            I had originally thought about just dividing the interviewees answers into sub-clips for each keyword/subject, then placing those in bins labeled with that keyword/subject. For future purposes I had guessed doing it in metadata (XMP) for the actual file would be better long term. (Using the Schema/XMP abilities within Premiere)

            • 3. Re: Keyword challenges
              Glitchdog Level 1

              In our seasoned world of nonlinear editing I would think that setting up keywords, favourites or similar for interview clips or b-roll would be very well refined. Apparently not, but maybe I'm just missing finding a grand solution in my google searching.

               

              OR maybe people are doing this in their asset management software? As a side note, I would love to hear some thoughts on this, as we are looking at a cost effective asset management software that could integrate well with Premiere.

               

              BUT back to my thoughts on keywords in Premiere. I should be able to set up stock keywords, for example, that are common in the video work I do to use in every video project. Certainly some keywords would be unique to a project, BUT I should only have to type in the keywords ONCE. Then simply connect or attach the related clips to that keyword. Maybe I've missed this in Premiere. But the only solution I can see is using the metadata and keep typing in the same keywords for every interview clip. Huge margin for error and so slow.

               

              I've given up on using metadata for this purpose for now and am simply making notes/highlighting on the interview transcripts THEN using multiple temp timelines to organize the different interview bits. I guess I could call it keyword timelines

               

              OK, enough of my rant. Would love to hear your response, critique, etc.

              • 4. Re: Keyword challenges
                Kevin-Monahan Adobe Employee

                Glitchdog,

                Make a feature request here: Premiere Pro: Hot (1039 ideas) – Adobe video & audio apps

                 

                Thanks,
                Kevin

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Keyword challenges
                  eikonoklastes Level 4

                  You might want to look at Prelude, included in the CC subscription. It's a logging and keyword management app that had a lot of potential to be a leader in clip management and logging, but years of neglect by Adobe has left it still in a fairly basic state - it's been nearly untouched for the last 3 years or so.

                   

                  Give it a whirl anyway and see if it helps out. It has some nice features like building a tag map that allows you to easily reuse tags as subclips or comments.

                  • 6. Re: Keyword challenges
                    Glitchdog Level 1

                    Thanks Kevin will do.

                     

                    Also, thank you eikonoklastes for the suggestion. I think I remember that Prelude initially came into being as a result of BBC and/or CNN requests. I use Prelude all the time for ingesting and more recently to set up transcoding and renaming clips, except for a few times it was too buggy. I'll check into the keyword possibilities, but will likely wait till something more powerful and user friendly is integrated.

                     

                    There seems to be a move to integrate more into one application in our industry, like grading, audio, better titling... in Premiere. which I think is wise and so helpful for small nonprofit communications depts