7 Replies Latest reply on Apr 28, 2018 1:38 PM by Per Berntsen

    TIFF vs. JPEG

    GreggInKC

      I am a complete novice when it comes to Adobe. My first project was fraught with setbacks and in the end I had to have someone else finish the lose ends to get to the printer in time. My questions I'm sure are basic but I want to move ahead on my current project knowing that what has already been done will stay in tact.

      I am working to clean up my clients Lightroom CC in preparation for transferring the photos to her MAC as a second location.

       

      Background: My client is in her mid 70's and is the remaining member of her immediate family. Many years back she was given the family photos that had been collected by several family members. Somewhere in the range of 12,000 beginning with family photos from the 1930's or earlier. She has laboriously scanned all the photos in TIFF format to LightRoom CC. This project took her several years, even logging all names of those photographed and locations where pictures were taken. She now has  archival quality photos she wants to share with the next generations.

       

      Current Project: When she started the project, she says she was told she had to create a MAC format and a PC format of each TIFF photo. This was explained to me when I opened LRcc and found 70,000 photos. Many pictures had 3-4 duplicates which she says are the different formats. I am in charge of scaling this down with the following goals in mind. I have included my questions under each goal.

       

      1. Ensure that each family member has the highest quality photo possible.

        - I understand that TIFF is archival and print quality. I also know that this format is cumbersome for the way that most people want to use photos today                          (easy access while using limited space on varying devices, ability to share via email, iPhoto, social media, etc.) Is it possible to easily share the photos at the current quality? In the process of sharing (by email, iPhoto....) will the photos automatically be converted into JPEG? If they are shared as TIFF will they use up to much storage for the average family member?

       

           2. Not losing MAC and PC formats if they are needed.

                - Are these needed? I was under the impression that sharing digital photos was universal now. Can I delete all of the copies, keeping just the original TIFF       

                     scan per photo without impeding universal viewing and access to the TIFF quality?

                - The photos seem to be uploading from LRcc to iPhotos in the TIFF format. Will they stay TIFF when sent out or posted somewhere or be converted to

                    JPEG? 

      One last thing. She would also like for the information of who is in the photo to be visible with the photo (not just accessible thru the info box).

                     Perhaps as a banner or copy below each photo. is there a was this can be done in LRcc?

       

      Thank you in advance for your suggestions and solutions.

        • 2. Re: TIFF vs. JPEG
          Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

          I am working to clean up my clients Lightroom CC

          Exactly what version of Lightroom is this? Go to Help > About Lightroom to verify. (might be in the Lightroom menu on a Mac)

           

          in preparation for transferring the photos to her MAC as a second location.

          Can you clarify what this means?

           

          she was told she had to create a MAC format and a PC format of each TIFF photo. This was explained to me when I opened LRcc and found 70,000 photos. Many pictures had 3-4 duplicates which she says are the different formats. I am in charge of scaling this down with the following goals in mind. I have included my questions under each goal.

          The tiff format is cross platform, and the files should open on both Macs and PCs.

          Creating different versions for Mac and PC is a thing of the (distant) past.

           

          Is it possible to easily share the photos at the current quality? In the process of sharing (by email, iPhoto....) will the photos automatically be converted into JPEG? If they are shared as TIFF will they use up to much storage for the average family member?

          Sharing a tiff file won't change it into a jpg.

          You have to use Lightroom's Export module to create jpgs.

          And yes, sharing tiffs is not a good idea - they take up a lot of space, and most people wouldn't know what to do with them.

           

          Can I delete all of the copies, keeping just the original TIFF scan per photo without impeding universal viewing and access to the TIFF quality?

          The answer is most likely yes, make sure that you keep the highest resolution/best quality version.

           

          She would also like for the information of who is in the photo to be visible with the photo (not just accessible thru the info box).

          Perhaps as a banner or copy below each photo. is there a was this can be done in LRcc?

          First of all, the photos will have be exported with Metadata set to All in Lightroom's export module.

          Then, the exported image has to viewed in an application that displays metadata.

          I am no expert on metadata, but different applications may display different metadata fields, and I guess the safest fields to use in Lightroom are Title and Caption.

          As far as I know, there is no way to have the metadata display below the image. (but for all I know, there may be image viewers that can be set up to do this)

           

          Having a better understanding of how digital images (and Lightroom) work will make this job easier for you.

          I have written a few articles that you may find useful:

          What is a digital image?

          File formats

          Lightroom basics

          Note that the Lightroom article deals with the desktop version (Classic) - formerly called Lightroom CC.

          There is also a new cloud-based version of Lightroom called Lighroom CC, with fewer features than Classic, which I have never used.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 3. Re: TIFF vs. JPEG
            GreggInKC Level 1

            Exactly what version of Lightroom is this?

                 I'm using Lightroom CC version 1.3. The app is on my laptop but I believe it is cloud based.

             

            in preparation for transferring the photos to her MAC as a second location.

            Can you clarify what this means?

                      She wants to have the photos stored in Photos on her MAC desktop as well as in Lightroom CC. When I Opened LR

                      on the MAC,  it automatically began uploading all the photos into Photos on the MAC. I closed the app and it stopped. I

                      I didn't know that it would do this and it was over the weekend. Almost 6000 of the photos are now on the MAC. How can I 

                      keep this form happening when I open LR  to do this project. I want to avoid sorting through 70,000 pictures in two

                      different apps.

            Thanks so much for the articles. I will read them before I begin.

            • 4. Re: TIFF vs. JPEG
              Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

              You have the cloud-based version of Lightroom, which I think is the wrong choice for this project.

              It will upload everything you import, and even if you have the subscription that includes 1 TB of cloud space, I doubt that it will be enough for 70,000 tiffs.

              I suggest that you install Lightroom Classic, and use that instead. It's included in your subscription, and doesn't upload anything, but works with your files locally.

              See also https://www.lightroomqueen.com/lightroom-cc-vs-classic-features/

              1 person found this helpful
              • 5. Re: TIFF vs. JPEG
                JimHess Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                I agree. Lightroom CC (the cloud-based version) is not the best choice for this project. Lightroom Classic CC is much better suited because it has many more options and all images can be kept local.

                1 person found this helpful
                • 6. Re: TIFF vs. JPEG
                  GreggInKC Level 1

                  Thank you both. I came to the same conclusion, but only because I found she is working in Classic on her computer. Although, it was from the her Classic that the photos began uploading to Photos on her MAC. You say with Classic, all work is kept local. Does that mean all her photos are not being stored in the cloud as a back up? I had assumed they were in the cloud. I was going to work on this at home on my laptop. If I can access them from the cloud, Is this possible for me to work through Classic on my laptop with the files being as large as they are and being local in Classic? As stated, I have CC. If it is possible for me to work on this at home on my MacBook Pro, how do I get the classic app?

                  • 7. Re: TIFF vs. JPEG
                    Per Berntsen Adobe Community Professional

                    You say with Classic, all work is kept local. Does that mean all her photos are not being stored in the cloud as a back up?

                    Lightroom Classic does not back up images, the user has to do this manually.

                    One possibility is to use the Creative Cloud storage that comes with the Photography plan - 20 GB or 1 TB depending on which plan is chosen. I have never used this, but my understanding is that it works like Dropbox.

                     

                    If I can access them from the cloud, Is this possible for me to work through Classic on my laptop with the files being as large as they are and being local in Classic?

                    The way I see it, the only viable solution is that your client exports the folder containing all the tiffs as a catalog to an external hard drive.

                    To do do that, she should select the folder(s) in the Folders panel, then go to File > Export as Catalog, and make sure to check Export negative files (which means the originals) and Include available previews.

                    You would then connect the drive to your computer, launch Lightroom Classic, and open the catalog (which has the extension .lrcat) by using File > Open. (Catalog files are the only files that LR Classic can open)

                     

                    LR-export-as-catalog.png

                     

                     

                    If it is possible for me to work on this at home on my MacBook Pro, how do I get the classic app?

                    If you have the Lightroom CC plan, you only get Lightroom CC.

                    To get Lightroom Classic, you have to subscribe to one of the Photography plans.

                    1 person found this helpful