10 Replies Latest reply on Aug 7, 2018 7:58 PM by R Neil Haugen

    Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?

    chulwook47221222 Level 1

      I am a photographer.

      So I'm using a Wide-gamut monitor that supports adobeRGB 99%.

      However, if i try to edit the image, it is troublesome because the color is not correct in Premiere.

      I know that Premiere does not support Color Management.

      I have solved this problem by connecting a sRGB (Rec709) standard Gamut monitor in addition to the main monitor.

       

       

      So even on the Mac, Premiere has not read the monitor Gamut (monitor profile).

      I would like to know if there is any other way to do this.

        • 1. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
          rodneyb56060189 Level 4

          There are people here who have been pro still photographers and are now good video (digital film) people, and they will probably weigh in on this as they have lots of experience ( maybe PC instead of Mac, but it won't make difference ).

           

          I assume "I am a photographer" means still photographer. So, for printing out of a printer with like 300ppi images (paper prints) you would use adobe RGB. It has slightly more color / tonal range than sRGB. sRGB is good to show things on computer monitors (share stuff on computer monitors, like send JPG or something to another person who opens it on another computer to look at it ).

           

          There is also "web safe" color space ( as you know from using Photoshop, etc. ).

           

          PPro is basically for video editing, so it depends on how exact you want to be re: who you deliver your product to ( your exports) what color space you use on your monitor. Many people use rec 709 cause it's a TV standard.

           

          Let's say you have a primary monitor and it's a good one. It should be 'color calibrated' by hardware (gadget you put on screen) and software ( from monitor manufacturer or gadget maker). Examples are Eizo monitors, X-rite gadgets. The monitor should be calibrated for whatever you are using ( even though it has factory settings, it needs to be calibrated anyway). Some new monitors have built in self calibrating gadgets.

           

          It doesn't matter if your monitor tells you it is sRGB, adobe RGB or rec 709 unless it has been calibrated.

           

          Once calibrated it DOESN'T MATTER what you put onto that monitor from any program, because it will SHOW YOU what it is calibrated to. Where you want to mess around with ICC profiles and probably 3rd party software to help set this up properly, is IF YOU PRINT paper prints out of adobe RGB and want to make fine adjustments to accommodate specific PAPER grades and inks. I'm talking about dot gain and really fine adjustments.

           

          In the past ( and in professional broadcast industry) the rec 709 stuff is often coming out of a card ( like aja or black magic) or a pro camera via BNC cable from SDI. Oscilloscopes are used in pro broadcast industry to make sure voltages of IRE scale are correct, and YUV color / tone is correct.  Typically this is something like 16-235 on your monitor and like 7.5 to 100 on IRE scale ...somewhere around there, I forget exact numbers.  Most computer monitors are 0-255 ( 8 bit).

           

          So, you have a lot of stuff going on that you have to figure out just in terms of what you SEE which has NOTHING to do with PPro in the sense that PPro does not calibrate your monitor or your printer or nothin. And I personally wouldn't trust an ICC profile from a manufacturer ( like my little canon junk printer ) to do nothin, cause it's useless for replicating colors for decent photography. A little selphy sub dye printer does a much better job than my canon printer.

           

          Good luck and I'm sure others will chime in ...

           

           

          • 2. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
            rodneyb56060189 Level 4

            As a still photographer you already know about offset press work, like those big giant weber offset presses that print magazines, and books, and you use CMYK inks ( and color space in photoshop) for that stuff. Like, to make the color separations ( plates ). If you put stuff like that into PPro, change mode to RGB first and you can get by with 72ppi if you want.

             

             

            • 3. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
              chulwook47221222 Level 1

              I am doing calibration and profiling of monitors and printers using the X-rite i1 pro2.

              i am familiar with the color space and I engage in color management(lesson & colorist).

               

              Srgb and rec709 know there's a difference in gamma and gradation.

              But the gamut is the same.

               

              To accurately represent the srgb(=rec709) color in the adobergb monitor,

              i need to convert the rgb number of the adobergb color space (strictly monitor gamut) to the rgb number of the srgb color space.

               

              This works automatically in Photoshop.

              DaVinci Resolves works well when you convert the monitor profile to lut and assign it.

              However, Premiere does not seem to support this task.

              • 4. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
                chulwook47221222 Level 1

                And my monitor only supports adobeRGB

                It does not support the ability to convert to srgb or rec709.

                 

                So the program must support color management so that i can see the correct color.

                • 5. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
                  Conrad C Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  chulwook47221222  wrote

                  I know that Premiere does not support Color Management.

                  I have solved this problem by connecting a sRGB (Rec709) standard Gamut monitor in addition to the main monitor...

                  ...I would like to know if there is any other way to do this.

                  Connecting an sRGB/rec.709 monitor is currently the recommended way to solve this problem.

                   

                  The only other way to solve it would be if your monitor supports internal hardware calibration and can store multiple calibrations, like the NEC SpectraView line, where you can create an sRGB/rec.709 calibration and switch to it for work in Premiere Pro.

                   

                  But if your wide gamut monitor can't do that, what you are doing now is the best solution.

                  • 6. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
                    R Neil Haugen Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    As noted above PrPro is built around the main current broadcast standard which is Rec 709, which specifies sRGB. And also as noted does not currently allow any user settings except for some (perhaps limited) ability to set for Rec 2020.

                     

                    With both wider gamut and dynamic range coming into consumer gear, though both in "market penetration " terms are still quite small, it is clear they are expanding. At NAB there was discussion in the Adobe booth area about this between users and staff and all they could say was essentially anything like this is subject to change when and as seen to be needed.

                     

                    So please feel requested to post over on the UserVoice system linked at the top of the Overview page of this forum that full user color management controls are in your view needed.

                     

                    Now ... gamut conversions are not as simple as simply reassigning numbers. A-RGB has many colors that do not exist in sRGB. So you can sort of squash A-RGB into sRGB mathematically though some hues will lose enough gradations that they lose details.

                     

                    Going the other way, trying to expand an image that began as sRGB into a wider place means pushing things out where they never were.

                     

                    As someone with 40+ years as a pro still portrait photographer I've a ton of experience working from our RAW files into either sRGB for typical printing or A-RGB for some other uses. Starting with a 14-bit RAW file it's easier to do, but if you're going to uses with both A-RGB and sRGB of the same file, they oft need to become separate images, one version of each.

                     

                    Basically the whole color space/profile issue in video is a bit of a mess. Only Firefox of the browsers is color-aware. Most players aren't color conscious, other than like TVs they intentionally are designed to juice the image to "enhance the viewing experience".

                     

                    So, best wishes. And of course none of us has any control of a single screen our viewers will use, and no two screens are ever alike. Delightful isn't it?

                     

                    Neil

                    • 7. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
                      rodneyb56060189 Level 4

                      Neil, I don't get it. You mean he can't apply some generic LUT ( like to an adjustment layer or whatever ) to PPro for rec 709 ? I know it wouldn't be camera specific ( red, arri, etc. ) or from some specific log thing, but he can't SEE rec 709 on that monitor, for PPro, no matter what ??

                       

                      ??

                      • 8. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
                        R Neil Haugen Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        Well ... PrPro will to it's best ability display at Rec709 inside the app on any system, but has no control nor 'knowledge' of the monitor settings/calibration.

                         

                        So it can at times come pretty close to Rec709 but without the monitor calibrated to that, well ... you aren't totally hitting the mark.

                         

                        Neil

                        1 person found this helpful
                        • 9. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
                          rodneyb56060189 Level 4

                          Well, I know for a fact that until last week when I got the Eizo monitor and calibration gadget, and made the rec 709 (emulated) which I guess is the sRBG deal re: GAMUT, and tested it with SDI output reference monitor comparison and burned BD of color bars and so on, I had crap and no standard.

                           

                          I hate it when someone starts talking about this stuff and makes me doubt that PPro is doing something that can be quantified. If some other program works, like resolve or whatever, then they should use that and not bash PPro for something it obviously doesn't offer or pretend to offer.

                           

                          Use Resolve if it works. Use what works. I hate it when someone starts making me doubt what I spent a lot of money on and some brain power to get even a worm-like view of what reality is. Waste of time and scares me.

                           

                          I'm going to start totally ignoring ANYTHING having to do with color correction in this forum. It's like ANARCHY !

                           

                           

                          • 10. Re: Does Premiere not support the Widegamut monitor?
                            R Neil Haugen Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                            Hmmm.

                             

                            PrPro running through decently calibrated systems handles Rec 709 fine. If the system isn't set for that, it can't. That's always been the case.

                             

                            But it's only designed to be used with sRGB/Rec 709 gamma 2.2-2.4 monitors for most reliable color. Outside of that it attempts to show appropriate images inside it's own program and reference monitors. There's obviously no guarantee on that however.

                             

                            Which is where one needs to heavily rely on scopes.

                             

                            That's  ... basic.

                             

                            Neil

                            1 person found this helpful