10 Replies Latest reply on May 27, 2008 6:25 AM by (Martin_Moore)

    New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK

      I am new to CMYK. I am doing a book in CMYK and have converted my files from RGB to CMYK and now the printer is woried about some of the smaller text being missalligned and they are telling me that I need to make the text layers K, not CMYK. The files are created in Photoshop CS3. How do I do that.

      Thanks,

      Roy
        • 1. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
          (Marco_Ugolini) Level 1
          You mean that you're setting the text is in Photoshop? That's not a good idea, and it also seems that it's in four-color black ("rich black", which is made of tints of CMY as well as K).

          The text would be far sharper and clearer, and look far better, if you set it in an application like Illustrator, or InDesign, and make it K-only (black-only), possibly overprinting as well.
          • 2. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
            Level 1
            I am a photographer and I don't have any of those softwares, only photoshop. Is there now way to set the text layers only to just black before I flatten the layers in Photoshop?

            Roy
            • 3. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
              Level 1
              Sure there's a way to do it. Convert your files to CMYK first before you do your type and then designate it as 100% K only. Or, select the type after converting and fill it with 100% K, but don't expect it to look very good unless it's huge type. Just because you're a photographer doesn't mean you don't need additional tools. There's a reason that you don't set small type in Ps. Doing your type in Quark Xpress, InDesign or Illustrator allow it to remain separate from the Photoshop image and when the entire job is sent to press, your type is then rendered at the full resolution of the imagesetter - usually 2500-3600 dpi - instead of at the line screen ruling of the halftones, which is what the type gets printed at if you do it all in Ps.

              In addition, if this is your first foray into CMYK, I hope you are communicating with your printer about what they are expecting in terms of what type of CMYK files you need to provide. Do they have their own profiles for their proofing systems? Do they print to any of the industry standards like SWOP, Gracol, FOGRA, etc? Do you know what ink limits you need to adhere to for their printing conditions?

              You can often look at ads in the back of small magazines to see how bad type set in Ps looks. Just look for the super fuzzy type with color fringes (where the press is mis-registered) to see what you job might look like.
              • 4. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
                (Marco_Ugolini) Level 1
                You could conceivably set your type on its own in a layer in Photoshop, make it 100%K, and set the layer to Multiply blend mode (which mimics overprinting).

                Still, your type will *not* be as sharp as it woud be if you set it in Illustrator or InDesign, because in those applications the type is treated as a vector object, and is ripped to the plate at the highest possible RIP resolution (say, 2400dpi), whereas in Photoshop the type is an anti-aliased raster element and therefore fuzzy by definition, limited as it is by the resolution of the image file itself (say, 300ppi).

                In other words, if you set your type in Photoshop, it will not look sharp, not even if it's K-only.
                • 5. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
                  (Aandi_Inston) Level 1
                  Really, really, don't add text in Photoshop. Even using Word would be
                  better than that (though it won't work with CMYK). You need suitable
                  tools for the job of preparing for print, just as you need a suitable
                  camera for your photography. For a book, InDesign - Illustrator is for
                  single page designs.

                  Aandi Inston
                  • 6. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
                    Level 1
                    Thank you all for your help and input. This is the first book I have done of my works and it looks as though I will need to get Illustrator if I do another. The printer was of course concerned with a 10 font type that I had used for the copyright.

                    Thanks,

                    Roy
                    • 7. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
                      Larry Tseng Level 1
                      Photoshop can be an okay application to use if just a few words need to be added to an image. Just save the file as PDF or EPS to avoid text rasterization. If saved as EPS, make sure that Include Vector Data is checked under EPS Options.

                      Larry
                      • 8. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
                        (Aandi_Inston) Level 1
                        > looks as though I will need to get Illustrator if I do anothe

                        Not Illustrator: InDesign, if you are doing the actual layout of the
                        book, multiple pages.

                        Aandi Inston
                        • 9. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
                          Level 1
                          I'd second InDesign over Illustrator for your use.

                          Also the saving from Photoshop as PDF if you are not adding huge amounts of text can work as well to keep sharp with font data intact but not sure if there would be any way to get overprints. If you build your files the same you would be able to batch this in a simple action to save all as pdf with fonts intact.
                          • 10. Re: New to CMYK- How do I dedicate text to K in CMYK
                            >This is the first book I have done of my works and it looks as though I will need to get Illustrator if I do another.

                            You definitely need InDesign, ...not Illustrator! Why many has mentioned Illustrator here, is probably because they didn't knew you were doing a book, but rather only a single page or leaflet or ad or something. For the latter, Illy works fine. But for a book, you really need InDesign.
                            Once you go InDesign, you never turn back to Photoshop for the kinds of jobs you have to get done! :)