5 Replies Latest reply on Apr 19, 2008 6:30 PM by Paul Cutler

    A good solution

    Paul Cutler Level 1
      I am running a design department consisting of Mac Pros with Apple LCD displays. The proof printer is a Canon C1 Imagepress. I am looking for a monitor/proofer calibration solution for the shop. My first instinct is the Eye-One Design bundle.

      What do you guys think?

      tia

      pbc
        • 1. Re: A good solution
          Paul Cutler Level 1
          Still wondering if anyone has an opinion of this product. It seems to do what I want, I know the monitor calibrator has good reviews on these forums. I have not found a specific reference to this package however.

          Any thoughts or experiences?

          pbc
          • 2. Re: A good solution
            Lou Dina Level 3
            Paul,

            Xrite has so many damn versions and combinations, I can't find the details of what is included in the EyeOne Design bundle, and what the software capabilities are. Otherwise, I'd comment.

            I will offer the following suggestions, however, which may help you investigate.

            1. If your software can automatically detect the presence of OBA's (optical brighteners in the paper), then I'd buy the standard spectrophotometer, not the one with the UV cutoff filter installed. If your software does NOT have the ability to detect the presence of OBA's, you will want the UV cut model.

            2. I am not familiar with the Canon C1 Imagepress. Is it driven by a CMYK RIP or an RGB driver? If it is an RGB device, then the i1 Match software that comes with the package you suggested is probably fine. If it is a CMYK device, EyeOne Match software will be limited in the options, for example, GCR and other parameters for building a "family" of CMYK profiles. That's how they get the price down, by simplifying the product and removing all the bells and whistles. Some of these software products don't even support CMYK, so be sure the product you buy supports your intended usage.

            I have ProfileMaker5, which allow me a lot of flexibility to change GCR, total ink limits, black ink limits, black start and black width, etc, with CMYK devices. If you don't need this flexibility, then the EyeOne match software may be just fine. And if you only need RGB capability, there are very few options anyway, so either product will suffice.

            FWIW, I got great proofs from my Epson Inkjet using the RGB driver and custom RGB profiles created with ProfileMaker. They were dead ringers for the proofs I got back from high end commercial printers, who were very savvy on color management.

            Hope this helps some.

            Lou
            • 3. Re: A good solution
              Paul Cutler Level 1
              Thanks Lou - looks like it's time to do a little more research.

              It is a Fiery RIP known as the ImagePress Server T1.

              At this point I have disabled color management on the RIP. The reason I disabled it was that I had this problem: the black plate of a rich black mixture that was behind the transparent part of a .psd placed in ID would print few percentage points lighter. The other plates were fine.

              Drove me crazy since the colors of a PDF matched up in Acrobat Pro. The PDFs would also print the same way. Disabling color management on the RIP cleared that up.

              Was that the correct way to solve the problem?

              This is a link to the server brochure if you are interested:
              http://www.usa.canon.com/cpr/pdf/Brochures/copier_ipress_server_t1_brochure_042007.pdf

              I only need to use this for proofing, it is not a production machine. Other than that problem I mentioned it matches the magazine and brochure work we do very well already, newsprint is well, newsprint

              pbc
              • 4. Re: A good solution
                Lou Dina Level 3
                Hi Paul. Responses below...

                It is a Fiery RIP known as the ImagePress Server T1.

                Drove me crazy since the colors of a PDF matched up in Acrobat Pro. The PDFs would also print the same way. Disabling color management on the RIP cleared that up.

                Was that the correct way to solve the problem?

                Yup...CMYK. So, make darn certain whatever profiling software you buy is CMYK capable. Most of the less expensive profiling packages have a few presets for CMYK, but don't give you total control. So, you will need to look into that if you want different levels of GCR, different ink limits, etc.

                At this point I have disabled color management on the RIP. The reason I disabled it was that I had this problem: the black plate of a rich black mixture that was behind the transparent part of a .psd placed in ID would print few percentage points lighter. The other plates were fine.

                Some people handle color management outside of the RIP for this and other reasons, and just let the RIP rasterize the file. If you have a good custom profile, you can soft proof in Photoshop, Indesign, or whatever, and then convert to profile before sending the job to the RIP. Then print with the RIP, but make sure you turn off color management in the RIP so you don't double color manage the file. If the RIP does a good job handling color conversions, you can let the RIP do it, or do it as I suggested above. Either is valid. If you are using Adobe software, the Adobe Color Management Engine is pretty good and is a safe way to go.

                This is a link to the server brochure if you are interested:
                http://www.usa.canon.com/cpr/pdf/Brochures/copier_ipress_server_t1_brochure_042007.pdf

                I took a quick look at your proofer info. Toner based color lasers are getting better all the time. I haven't done a lot with them in awhile, but a few years ago they used to be somewhat temperamental and variable due to temperature, humidity, residual moisture content in the paper, etc. Some of them needed to be profiled fairly often for accurate color, since they could be a moving target. Hopefully, your unit has a calibration routine that will bring it back to a standard baseline. If so, be sure to run the calibration and linearization routine BEFORE profiling, then if you need to, you can run it again as needed. This way, you may be able to get away without reprofiling constantly. The key is consistency. If you can maintain consistent, standardized output, then your profiles will remain fairly accurate.

                I only need to use this for proofing, it is not a production machine. Other than that problem I mentioned it matches the magazine and brochure work we do very well already, newsprint is well, newsprint

                Since it is only for proofing, you might do fine with a less expensive CMYK profiling package using their presets. GCR is more important on press than it is on a proofing device. Like I said, I got great matches on my Epson inkjet using the driver and custom color profiles. I didn't really need CMYK and different flavors of GCR to get a good match. But do yourself a favor, and make sure you know what the CMYK profiling options are up front.

                Lou
                • 5. Re: A good solution
                  Paul Cutler Level 1
                  Oh man if I had the patience an inkjet would be just fine. I have to generate a lot of proofs.

                  Thanks for the info Lou that really cleared up a lot for me.

                  Now back to the research

                  pbc