5 Replies Latest reply on Jun 17, 2008 4:46 AM by Lou Dina

    InDesign CS2 default rendering intent, which one is it?

    Gusgsm Level 2
      If I print a proof with InDesign CS2 (or CS3, now that it comes), I know that "simulate paper color" means using absolute rendering intent when converting from one profile (press, ie: the document's profile) to another (proof).<br /><br />But, if I don't use that simulation, which one is the rendering intent InDesign is using? Perceptual? Colorimetric relative? the one in the document profile by default? ... <confused><br /><br />Thanks, Gustavo :)
        • 1. Re: InDesign CS2 default rendering intent, which one is it?
          Al Ferrari Level 1
          It uses the one you tell it to use. This tutorial movie explains how:

          http://av.adobe.com/russellbrown/CS2InDesignPrintSM.mov
          • 2. Re: InDesign CS2 default rendering intent, which one is it?
            Al,

            download 7 Mbytes for something which is anyway
            explained in the ordinary help texts ?
            A movie for something which should be explainable
            by a few phrases ?

            Short answer: the Default = System Rendering
            Intent (as synchronized by Bridge) is used, unless
            for a specified object a different rendering intent
            is chosen.

            Right or Wrong - that's the question.

            Best regards --Gernot Hoffmann
            • 3. Re: InDesign CS2 default rendering intent, which one is it?
              Lou Dina Level 3
              Gustavo,

              I agree with all the above posts. If you want to, you can override the document's default rendering intent for any image. All you have to do is right-click on the image inside of your InDesign document, and change the graphics properties.

              For example, if the document default rendering intent is Relative Colorimetric, and you have an image that looks better with Perceptual, just change that individual image to perceptual. All other images will retain the document default RC intent unless you change them.

              Lou
              • 4. Re: InDesign CS2 default rendering intent, which one is it?
                Gusgsm Level 2
                Arghh.

                Thanks to all, but specially to Lou that summarized what was (should have been) evident: The general rendering intent for proofing is what you specify in the Color Settings as "conversion rendering intent".

                (Right?) :)
                • 5. Re: InDesign CS2 default rendering intent, which one is it?
                  Lou Dina Level 3
                  Gustavo,

                  That is correct. I leave my default set to Relative Colorimetric with BPC. Then, when editing images in Photoshop, I will soft proof and try both RC and Perceptual to see which I like best. If I prefer perceptual on that particular image, I will override the RC default inside of InDesign and set it to Perceptual for that specific image.

                  In my workflow, I normally leave the rendering intent set to default. I usually have the luxury of knowing exactly which press will be used to print my job, and obtain the press profile before designing. Then, I convert my RGB files directly to that CMYK press profile in Photoshop, so all colors are within the press color gamut. Since there are no out of gamut colors, rendering intent is not an issue.

                  If you don't know the final destination or have a press profile at the time of design, you can select a generic CMYK, use untagged CMYK images, or even RGB files and place them into InDesign. Once you know the final destination, you can export to PDF using the final press profile, if you have one. Soft proofing the images before conversion can show you which intent will look better. There are lots of ways to handle it.

                  Regards, Lou