8 Replies Latest reply on Jan 21, 2009 2:28 PM by (xbytor)

    Camera set to sRGB, Opens as Adobe RGB

      I have a Canon 5D, color space set to sRGB. When opening RAW file in Camera Raw 5.0, it opens as Adobe RGB. How can I fix this?

      Thanks!
        • 1. Re: Camera set to sRGB, Opens as Adobe RGB
          JimHess-8IPblY Level 3
          Click on the blue text near the bottom of the ACR screen. That is where you set your ACR preferences.
          • 2. Re: Camera set to sRGB, Opens as Adobe RGB
            Ramón G Castañeda Level 4
            Greg,

            Jim has given you the solution.

            As further clarification, the color space you set in your camera affects ONLY the JPEGs you record in the camera, and it is TOTALLY irrelevant for RAW images. RAW images are not in ANY color space, it's you who determines how your files are rendered during the conversion and in what color space they will be in when you open them in Photoshop, through the workflow settings that Jim has pointed out to you.
            • 3. Re: Camera set to sRGB, Opens as Adobe RGB
              Level 1
              Ahh, brilliant. Thanks to both of you!
              • 4. Re: Camera set to sRGB, Opens as Adobe RGB
                John_Cornicello_Photo Level 2
                There is one other effect from setting the camera to Adobe RGB. The filename changes to have an underscore as the first character.

                True that this doesn't affect the contents of the file, but it can be confusing if you don't rename your files. If I was to receive a file called _MG_1234.TIF from someone I would be expecting it to be in the Adobe RGB space.
                • 5. Re: Camera set to sRGB, Opens as Adobe RGB
                  Panoholic Level 2
                  There is another aspect of the color space selection in-camera: the histogram and the clipping indication. As these are based on the embedded preview image, they reflect the settings.

                  How to achieve ETTR is a complex issue and off-topic; it should be enough to say here, that shooting with Adobe RGB may conceal clipping.
                  • 6. Re: Camera set to sRGB, Opens as Adobe RGB
                    Level 1
                    > How to achieve ETTR is a complex issue and off-topic; it should be enough to say here, that shooting with Adobe RGB may conceal clipping.

                    Wouldn't that be true only if you were targeting a smaller space, like sRGB? For
                    Adobe RGB and ProPhoto, it shouldn't be an issue.

                    -X
                    • 7. Re: Camera set to sRGB, Opens as Adobe RGB
                      Panoholic Level 2
                      > Wouldn't that be true only if you were targeting a smaller space, like sRGB?

                      Factual clipping, i.e. pixel saturation on the raw level has nothing to do with the intention regarding the processing of the raw image. If pixel saturation is reached, then the raw pixel value is invalid.

                      The issue is, how one can achieve an in-camera conversion, which resembles the closest the raw data, in order to be able to tell how the actual exposure was. There are several steps, which can not be neutralized for the in-camera conversion, one of them being the color space conversion. Furthermore, the spectral characteristics of the color filters play a huge role in this question, so my suggestion is camera model related.

                      For example re the Nikon D300 I suggest using Adobe RGB in-camera. This is, because Nikon changed the color filters for the D300 sensors from the previous models very much. They are almost always changed from one model to another, but this change was extraordinarily big: the transmissity of the red range is much larger in all three filters than with other sensors. This has lead lots of photographers believe that the "red channel overexposes" (which occurs very seldom, practically nie before green saturation). Thus my (unproven!) suggestion is, that the in-camera histogram and clipping indication of the D300 gets closer to reflecting the raw data with Adobe RGB than with sRGB.
                      • 8. Re: Camera set to sRGB, Opens as Adobe RGB
                        Level 1
                        G Sch wrote:
                        > Thus my (unproven!) suggestion is, that the in-camera histogram and clipping indication of the D300 gets closer to reflecting the raw data with Adobe RGB than with sRGB.

                        This has been my operating assumption, as well.

                        If I understand this correctly, having the camera set to sRGB:
                        1) may indicate clipping that is not actually occurring at the raw level
                        2) should (accurately?) indicate clipping when using sRGB for rendering
                        3) should indicate clipping that is occurring on the in-camera generated jpg
                        4) provides no indication of whether the clipping will occur with AdobeRGB or
                        PhotoRGB rendering.

                        I have my D80 set to AdobeRGB and process with PhotoRGB so I really haven't seen
                        this problem in practice.