5 Replies Latest reply on Oct 31, 2007 1:07 PM by Thomas Knoll

    DIGITAL WORKFLOW -help

    (Jazzy_Sam)
      Hi out there,
      I have a Nikon D200 camera,Photoshop CS2 and WIndows.
      Now in my camera settings i take photos as Raw + Jpeg fine, my camera doesn't have TIFF.
      My photos are for printing -medium to large- and web.
      I am kind of new to the digital thing...
      I have been reading, asking, and wondering about digital workflow, i know it's a personal business but i am a little lost in there....but i don't want to spend most of my time doing this, now that i spend half on the computer!

      Now this is what i do,
      does it make sense?any suggestions?any additions as to bits, resolution, etc?

      1.CONVERT RAW INTO DNG (directly from camera if possible) USING DNG CONVERTER.(DELETE RAW) STORE
      2. MAKE CHANGES FROM THE DNG FILE IN ACR, SAVE AS DNG, NEW FILE.
      3.IF MAKE FURTHER CHANGES WITH PHOTOSHOP, SAVE CHANGES AS a.PSD (STORE AND USE FOR WEB) AND b.AS JPEG (STORE AND USE FOR PRINT)
      4.MAKE CONTACT SHEETS, GALLERY, ETC

      I don't have Lightroom, is it worth getting into more programs?
      Am questioning why i set Jpeg copy in my camera...

      Thanks.
      Jazzy from Spain
        • 1. Re: DIGITAL WORKFLOW -help
          Art Campbell Level 3
          You probably should join or check the archives of the Digital Nikon email list at some point... Also, you're somewhat limiting your self to just using Photoshop as your only software, although it does do most things very well. But you should also look at the Nikon software packages and other third party offerings, just as you'd look at different films for different types of analog shooting.

          My own comments on your work flow:
          1. Why go to DNG? You've already got RAW. You don't need to duplicate it. Changes made in ACR to the RAW file are non-destructive; it isn't changed. Archive a copy of the RAW file and go on...

          2. As soon as you open a RAW in Photoshop, you've created a Photoshop format file. Why make a third copy of your "not RAW any more" file? Why not just use the .PSD and save it for print (see below)?

          3. JPG generally is a web-only format; it's somewhere below poor for printing and reproduction. So I'd reverse your formats and intended uses.

          Cheers,
          Art
          • 2. Re: DIGITAL WORKFLOW -help
            michael shaffer Level 1
            > 1.CONVERT RAW INTO DNG (directly from camera if possible) USING DNG CONVERTER.(DELETE RAW) STORE

            Directly from the camera is not suggested ... leastwise, some are mentioning problems with file integrity or nor being able to see the files, but YMMV. Better, would be to use a card reader. DNG raw files are great if you want to keep your ACR settings within the file itself (as opposed to a sidecar XMP file). My own preference is to convert to DNG and delete the original, but others aren't as comfortable with deleting the original.

            2. MAKE CHANGES FROM THE DNG FILE IN ACR, SAVE AS DNG, NEW FILE.

            ACR adjustments are non-destructive ... no need to save a new file.

            3.IF MAKE FURTHER CHANGES WITH PHOTOSHOP, SAVE CHANGES AS a.PSD (STORE AND USE FOR WEB) AND b.AS JPEG (STORE AND USE FOR PRINT)

            Keep your preferred color space with the (a) PSD file, and you can (b) convert to sRGB for saving the JPEG for web presentation.

            As for your suggested workflow, you do not mention your preferred color space. It should of course be sRGB for the web, but your camera is capable of many more colors than sRGB can accommodate. For printing I would suggest you at least use AdobeRGB.

            HTH & cheerios :)
            • 3. Re: DIGITAL WORKFLOW -help
              Bill_Janes Level 2
              You might want to take a look at a white paper on the Adobe web site: Workflow by Jeff Schewe

              As you point out, any work flow involves personal preferences and needs and you can modify that work flow to meet your own situation. An advantage to the DNG format is that it is fully documented and less likely to suffer from obsolescence in coming years. Also, the ACR settings can be stored in the DNG rather in side car files or a central database, and are less likely to become separated from the raw file in archiving.

              The TIFF format is probably better than PSD, since it is supported by more applications and is not proprietary.
              • 4. Re: DIGITAL WORKFLOW -help
                michael shaffer Level 1
                > The TIFF format is probably better than PSD, since it is supported by more applications and is not proprietary.

                Although you cannot expect other TIFF readers to open a PS written TIFF that might include special layers like adjustment layers. It would be curious to know which other TIFF readers are as robust and versatile as Photoshop(?) Lightroom? What else?

                cheerios
                • 5. Re: DIGITAL WORKFLOW -help
                  Thomas Knoll Level 2
                  "Although you cannot expect other TIFF readers to open a PS written TIFF that might include special layers like adjustment layers."

                  Why not? Any decent TIFF reader should be able to read the composite image that is always saved as the main part of the TIFF file. Photoshop layer data is just a private tag that they should ignore.