8 Replies Latest reply on Feb 3, 2008 11:32 AM by (Chet_Williams)

    Real World Camera Raw question

    Level 1
      I have been reading Real World Camera Raw. It is a great book and I have
      learned a great deal, but I am still having a problem completely
      understanding sharpening. One bit I do not understand well is the detail
      tab, and in part, because of the authors use of lingo. I just do not
      understand what they mean by this phrase. Moving it (the detail tab) all
      the way to the left (zero) will almost completely pin the sharpening edge
      halo What do they mean by pin, is that a good or bad thing, what is the
      use of pining the edge halo? I wish that when someone wrights about a
      technical subject, they would lose the cleaver words and phrases. Anyone
      care to enlighten me?

      JOHN PASSANEAU
        • 1. Re: Real World Camera Raw question
          Level 1
          It means it's using a halo suppression technique called pinning (as in stopping) to help keep the halo from getting to much contrast along the edges. Towards 100 means less suppression, towards zero means more suppression (or pinning).
          • 2. Re: Real World Camera Raw question
            Dirk Williams Level 1
            So going towards zero will cut down on the contrast along the edge of the halo... or the other way around?
            • 3. Re: Real World Camera Raw question
              Level 1
              Zero completely engages the halo dampening (pinning), yes. But that's not always, automatically an optimal solution. That's why the default is 25 and you can adjust it. Pretty easy to see what it's doing to edges by zooming into 300-400% and moving the slider around.
              • 4. Re: Real World Camera Raw question
                On Sat, 19 Jan 2008 15:29:38 -0800, Jeff_Schewe@adobeforums.com wrote in
                <3c05de94.0@webcrossing.la2eafNXanI>:

                >It means it's using a halo suppression technique called pinning (as in
                >stopping) to help keep the halo from getting to much contrast along the
                >edges. Towards 100 means less suppression, towards zero means more
                >suppression (or pinning).

                My own take is that deconvolution is a much better way to sharpen that
                unsharp mask, in part because it avoids the halo effect. Deconvolution
                was available in plug-ins like Focus Magic, and is now in Adobe main
                applications.

                --
                Best regards,
                John Navas http:/navasgroup.com
                • 5. Re: Real World Camera Raw question
                  Level 1
                  Jeff_Schewe@adobeforums.com wrote in
                  news:3c05de94.2@webcrossing.la2eafNXanI:

                  > Zero completely engages the halo dampening (pinning), yes. But that's
                  > Not always, automatically an optimal solution. That's why the default
                  > is 25 and you can adjust it. Pretty easy to see what it's doing to
                  > edges by zooming into 300-400% and moving the slider around.

                  I see what it does now, I was thrown off by the word pinning, as it is not
                  a term I have heard in photography except about sticking a photo to a wall.
                  As I come to digital photography from the film side this looks like the
                  digital analog of Mackie lines.
                  Anyway, I can see the effect now that I know what to look for. Thanks very
                  much for the quick responses everyone.

                  73
                  JOHN PASSANEAU
                  • 6. Re: Real World Camera Raw question
                    Level 1
                    "Deconvolution was available in plug-ins like Focus Magic, and is now in Adobe main applications."-John Navas

                    Which Adobe applications would these be?

                    "Pretty easy to see what it's doing to edges by zooming into 300-400% and moving the slider around." -Jeff Schewe
                    Do you recommend observing ALL sharpening effects at 300%-400% or just this one? ALL of the online guides I've read have suggested viewing the file at 100% for viewing sharpening and clarity. Usually I start with the Portrait or Landscape presets from Lightroom (which I saved as presets in ACR) and use 100% view to tweak the results. I find this still often oversharpens after I have resized and resharpened for the web. Is the 300%-400% view better for sharpness evaluation or are you just suggesting it as a tool to help betterunderstanding how the slider interacts on the edges?
                    • 7. Re: Real World Camera Raw question
                      Level 1
                      >Do you recommend observing ALL sharpening effects at 300%-400% or just this one?

                      No, not really!

                      In the case of CA corrections, it can be hard to determine with a high degree of accuracy unless your subject happens to have the right kind of detail...tree limbs going all over the place is pretty easy but not ever shot will be that easy.

                      As far as setting the sharpness, yes you NEED to be at 100% to even see the previews with the sharpening. It can be useful to zoom in more but only for the purpose of seeing the effects of sharpening on fine detail and when setting noise reduction. But, I always use the preview at 100% as the final guide.
                      • 8. Re: Real World Camera Raw question
                        Phil how did you convert the Lightroom presets to ACR presets?

                        Lightroom presets are suffixed with .lrtemplate and ACR presets are suffixed with .XMP. Further XMP look something like HTML and Lightroom looks something like C++. How is the conversion done?