4 Replies Latest reply on May 9, 2008 7:46 PM by (Jeff_Schewe)

    ACR4 default settings

      I am using windows XP Sp2, Just installed Photoshop CS3 and latest version of ACR. My camera is NIKON D300. How do I make ACR see the raw files automatically as 16 bit.
      James
        • 1. Re: ACR4 default settings
          adriana ohlmeyer Adobe Employee
          Click on the link at the bottom of the dialog (where it says AdobeRGb...),it will launch the workflow options dialog. Change the depth to 16bit. This setting will be sticky until you change it again.
          (Meaning all files will open in 16bit mode)
          • 2. Re: ACR4 default settings
            Level 1
            Thanks for this info
            • 3. Re: ACR4 default settings
              Level 1
              Maybe someone (RAW ACR knowledgeable person) can confirm the following....

              It is my belief that ACR uses the full bit resolution of the RAW file during its edits no matter what the work flow options are set to.

              The work flow options only apply when doing a save as to some other file type, or transferring the image directly to PSCS3. Thats when the work flow settings and conversion takes place. The editing of the RAW file in ACR does not change the raw data, the settings are stored as metadata in an XMP file. Again I believe that ACR is always working with the full bit depth of the RAW data.

              But remember that the RAW data must also be converted for the screen display so you will not always see exactly what is going on with the image since the RAW data has more information than your screen can display.

              Ed
              • 4. Re: ACR4 default settings
                Level 1
                >It is my belief that ACR uses the full bit resolution of the RAW file during its edits no matter what the work flow options are set to.

                No, Camera Raw down-samples to the output resolution set in the workflow options and the color space dictates the histogram and any clipping. As far as the actual processing, yes that's done in ProPhoto RGB linear gamma until the final color space transform.