5 Replies Latest reply on Nov 6, 2008 9:07 AM by Newsgroup_User

    IIS  issue?

    Level 7
      I just revamped a website. Same site, just had to update all the pages. I
      took the old site and put all the files in a folder labeled old site within
      the root. I then added all the updated pages. The server served up the
      updated home page but served up all the old pages for the remainder of the
      site. It wasn't until I deleted the old site folder containing the old pages
      from the server, that it finally served up the new pages.

      I thought by burying the old site in a folder, it would no longer be seen by
      the server. Guess I was wrong. Does IIS cache the website and serve up
      cached pages as long as the url is the same? Do I have to restart the server
      when I do something like this?

      Any info would be appreciated.
      Thanks
      -mark

        • 1. Re: IIS  issue?
          Level 7

          "Mark Morse" <mark.morse@sanmina-sci.com> wrote in message
          news:C535DAB7.A1F8%mark.morse@sanmina-sci.com...
          >I just revamped a website. Same site, just had to update all the pages. I
          > took the old site and put all the files in a folder labeled old site
          > within
          > the root. I then added all the updated pages. The server served up the
          > updated home page but served up all the old pages for the remainder of the
          > site. It wasn't until I deleted the old site folder containing the old
          > pages
          > from the server, that it finally served up the new pages.
          >
          > I thought by burying the old site in a folder, it would no longer be seen
          > by
          > the server. Guess I was wrong. Does IIS cache the website and serve up
          > cached pages as long as the url is the same? Do I have to restart the
          > server
          > when I do something like this?

          I'm presuming you have access to the server. When I've done site revamps, I
          usually create a new website on the server with the same IP/name as the
          "original" but serve it up on a different port number. Then when it's time
          to make the "new" version live, either swap the port numbers of the two
          sites or "stop" the old version and change the port number on the new site
          to 80. In either case, a stop/start of those sites is probably in order.
          Depending on your level of access to the server you could always start/stop
          the web services or bounce the box, too, but that's more on the extreme end
          of things.

          If your pages have the same name in both sites, there might be some caching
          going on in your browser (or if you're going through a proxy server). If
          your pages in the new site do not have the same names as in the old site and
          you're wanting to keep the links/referrals/page ranks, you could either just
          copy the old pages in (or have blank pages with the original names) but
          configure those pages to do a permanent redirect to the new pages (it's
          probably not as straight-forward as in Apache; but this might give you some
          tips on that:
          http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/6b855a7a-0884-4 508-ba95-079f38c77017.mspx?mfr=true)


          • 2. Re: IIS  issue?
            Level 7
            The new pages have the same names an urls as the old pages. I thought if I
            take all the old pages and put them one folder down from the root and then
            upload all the new pages into the root, the server would serve up the new
            pages. That didn't happen. It served up the old pages that were now one
            level down in the root and ignored the new pages within the root.

            It wasn't until I dumped the old pages from the server that the server began
            serving the new pages. I didn't think I needed to delete the old pages. Just
            hide them.

            >
            > "Mark Morse" <mark.morse@sanmina-sci.com> wrote in message
            > news:C535DAB7.A1F8%mark.morse@sanmina-sci.com...
            >> I just revamped a website. Same site, just had to update all the pages. I
            >> took the old site and put all the files in a folder labeled old site
            >> within
            >> the root. I then added all the updated pages. The server served up the
            >> updated home page but served up all the old pages for the remainder of the
            >> site. It wasn't until I deleted the old site folder containing the old
            >> pages
            >> from the server, that it finally served up the new pages.
            >>
            >> I thought by burying the old site in a folder, it would no longer be seen
            >> by
            >> the server. Guess I was wrong. Does IIS cache the website and serve up
            >> cached pages as long as the url is the same? Do I have to restart the
            >> server
            >> when I do something like this?
            >
            > I'm presuming you have access to the server. When I've done site revamps, I
            > usually create a new website on the server with the same IP/name as the
            > "original" but serve it up on a different port number. Then when it's time
            > to make the "new" version live, either swap the port numbers of the two
            > sites or "stop" the old version and change the port number on the new site
            > to 80. In either case, a stop/start of those sites is probably in order.
            > Depending on your level of access to the server you could always start/stop
            > the web services or bounce the box, too, but that's more on the extreme end
            > of things.
            >
            > If your pages have the same name in both sites, there might be some caching
            > going on in your browser (or if you're going through a proxy server). If
            > your pages in the new site do not have the same names as in the old site and
            > you're wanting to keep the links/referrals/page ranks, you could either just
            > copy the old pages in (or have blank pages with the original names) but
            > configure those pages to do a permanent redirect to the new pages (it's
            > probably not as straight-forward as in Apache; but this might give you some
            > tips on that:
            > http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/WindowsServer2003/Library/IIS/6b8
            > 55a7a-0884-4508-ba95-079f38c77017.mspx?mfr=true)
            >
            >


            • 3. Re: IIS  issue?
              Level 7

              "Mark Morse" <mark.morse@sanmina-sci.com> wrote in message
              news:C535FE30.A6C7%mark.morse@sanmina-sci.com...
              > The new pages have the same names an urls as the old pages. I thought if I
              > take all the old pages and put them one folder down from the root and then
              > upload all the new pages into the root, the server would serve up the new
              > pages. That didn't happen. It served up the old pages that were now one
              > level down in the root and ignored the new pages within the root.
              >
              > It wasn't until I dumped the old pages from the server that the server
              > began
              > serving the new pages. I didn't think I needed to delete the old pages.
              > Just
              > hide them.

              just curious, how did you move the folder? Did you move it in IIS or in just
              the regular Windows Explorer. I've not done this, so I have no idea if my
              thinking is even close to being on track, but is it possible that if you
              moved the folder w/in IIS instead of the regular Explorer that the specific
              Home Directory settings, etc, got moved, too? meaning that is it possible
              the path in the settings in IIS automatically updated themselves when the
              folder was moved?



              • 4. Re: IIS  issue?
                Level 7
                I used ftp to logon to the server. Created a new folder within the root and
                moved everything into it. I then used ftp to upload all the new files into
                the root.

                Usually if you have a file on the server with a specific url to get to it,
                then move that file someplace else, when you use the same url, you will get
                a 404 error.

                >
                > "Mark Morse" <mark.morse@sanmina-sci.com> wrote in message
                > news:C535FE30.A6C7%mark.morse@sanmina-sci.com...
                >> The new pages have the same names an urls as the old pages. I thought if I
                >> take all the old pages and put them one folder down from the root and then
                >> upload all the new pages into the root, the server would serve up the new
                >> pages. That didn't happen. It served up the old pages that were now one
                >> level down in the root and ignored the new pages within the root.
                >>
                >> It wasn't until I dumped the old pages from the server that the server
                >> began
                >> serving the new pages. I didn't think I needed to delete the old pages.
                >> Just
                >> hide them.
                >
                > just curious, how did you move the folder? Did you move it in IIS or in just
                > the regular Windows Explorer. I've not done this, so I have no idea if my
                > thinking is even close to being on track, but is it possible that if you
                > moved the folder w/in IIS instead of the regular Explorer that the specific
                > Home Directory settings, etc, got moved, too? meaning that is it possible
                > the path in the settings in IIS automatically updated themselves when the
                > folder was moved?
                >
                >
                >


                • 5. Re: IIS  issue?
                  Level 7
                  Mark Morse wrote:
                  > I used ftp to logon to the server. Created a new folder within the root and
                  > moved everything into it. I then used ftp to upload all the new files into
                  > the root.
                  >
                  > Usually if you have a file on the server with a specific url to get to it,
                  > then move that file someplace else, when you use the same url, you will get
                  > a 404 error.

                  If the files are called the same then your browser was caching them.
                  Clearing you cache would have solved that.

                  Dooza

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