15 Replies Latest reply on Feb 20, 2008 12:31 PM by the_wine_snob

    Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move

    Level 1
      I shot a wedding in HDV (1080i) for a friend as a wedding gift over a year ago. I had to rent a tripod at the last minute in another town and ended up with a bad tripod. At one point, during the ceremony the tripod dropped pretty bad and then there were the ensuing moves to correct it, etc... It looks pretty bad. Being a perfectionist I still have not delivered this video because I hadn't a clue how to fix it. I have since acquired a copy of all the phtographer's still shots (with full permission) and I'm experimenting with trying to patch it up somehow. The problem area is about 10 seconds I guess. Audio was unaffected since I had them on lavalier.

      I have dealth with this issue before on live corporate shoots, but could always fall back on the Powerpoint slide or some other graphic. Not an option here I don't think.

      I would really like to keep the already short ceremony in its entirety, without cutting it out.

      Any thoughts? Any input would be greatly appreciated. It's Valentine's Day, so it has me thinking of this project for some reason...

      -BChil
        • 1. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
          Level 1
          Did you film any cut away shots?? Like the audience at the ceremony or any architechial detail of the church? Maybe you can cut away. The Audience is always a good choice because they are looking at the same thing you are cutting away from.
          • 2. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
            Jim_Simon Level 8
            I had the same thought - cut aways. My other standard is to just cut the scene and put in on as a Deleted Scene complete with error.
            • 3. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
              Oblivion Dust Level 1
              How about a wide shot where you can't tell what anyone is saying and add the audio from the affected part. Or pull an Oliver Stone and edit in some stock footage of flowers blooming or something. Get all wacky creative.
              • 4. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                llaferte Level 1
                I can't think of any way to "fix it." After Effects has some capacity to help stabilize motion in the Tracker Control panel - but that's another discussion - try the After Effects Forum. Other wise cut to something as suggested above. Good luck.
                • 5. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                  Phil Griffith Level 2
                  where at in the cermony is problem? If it's not in any crucial spot and no dialog at the time, then a disolve might be the way.
                  • 6. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                    shooternz Level 6
                    What actually happened to the scene?. Is it just on a lean ( bad horizon) for ten seconds after the tripod shifted?

                    Blow it up and rotate the frame to correct. You may get some quality loss but that may save the scene
                    • 7. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                      Level 1
                      Thanks for all your input -

                      Unfortunately, I didn't have much time - as it was a very unorganized wedding (they did not have a rehearsal at all). I spent most of the time trying to track down the bride/groom to get their lav mics hooked up. So there was very little time before and everyone left immediately after it was over. For corporate meetings (usually at least 2 cameras) I ALWAYS have them pan over the crowd - even if I don't expect to use it - for just that reason.

                      It is during the exchange of the vows that they wrote for themselves, so it is pretty important to keep it in its entirety. The drop is mostly straight down and then straight back up, with little side to side wavering. I will definitely put the original scene on the "deleted scenes" DVD, combined with all the other "not for grandma" shots of the reception.

                      After looking more and getting your input, I think that i will use the photographers still shots of the crowd, with movement - and maybe get a little "wacky creative" with some b-roll beauty shots. I think I will also do it a couple of other times, so as to not make it so obvious...

                      I am going to try and finish it up this weekend, so if anyone else has input that would also be appreciated.

                      Thanks again,
                      -BChil
                      • 8. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                        billbuch Level 1
                        Never shot a wedding, but attended quite a few. Since your tripod problem occurred when they were reciting vows they had written themselves, best to cut it out anyway. Essentially a bride and groom's attempt to ape the folks who write sentiments for Hallmark cards, the vows they conjure up are typically so syrupy and overwrought, they're the verbal equivalent of grand ma's perfume.

                        On the other hand, just leave it in as it is, and tell the blissful couple you were so moved by their words that you lost your concentration and let the camera get away from you for a moment. They could then bask in the glory of believing that forever or until one or the other initiate divorce proceedings a year or so from now.

                        Bill Buchanan
                        Buchanan Film Co
                        • 9. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                          Phil Griffith Level 2
                          There's not much you can do.Like you mentioned earlier, keep the sound track and bring in some stills or other clips.
                          • 10. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                            if they wrote it themselves... and if they're still together - maybe explain what happened, and turn a negative into a positive by getting them to re-record their vows to each other - so you go from the build up in the ceremony, dissolve to some well-shot-in-beautiful-surroundings re-statement of the vows, then dissolve back to the ceremony.

                            or just think - f*ck it - life is short and people obsess way too much about their "one day" anyway... will they even watch it? and at the rate you're going, they're likely to be divorced by the time they get their DVD in any case. ;-)
                            • 11. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                              Phil Griffith Level 2
                              yes, but I know that if you make a mistake while recording their wedding, it don't matter if they really will watch it 5 years from now. most people probably won't. But it's the hear and now that they are seeing. I think your ideal of having them repeating their vows if they are willing is a good one. if it's during their vows, it's not like they aren't gonna notice.
                              • 12. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                                If your audio is clean during the snaffu, then just cut back to an audience shot, or close-up of the parents, or a wide shot of the ceremony (even if you already used this shots once before).
                                • 13. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                                  the_wine_snob Level 9
                                  One thought that came to my mind would be a cut-away to the "vows" themselves. Do not know how they were recorded, so that they could be read during the ceremony, but two schools of thought: the actual notes would have strong recognition value later on, or to reproduce these onto nice stock and shoot that. I can easily see a dream-like fade in (fade from white with blur) and a pan down on the documents, during the tripod mishap. Hope that the audio was not ruined by that (you did get the lavs. onto the couple, didn't you?). Then do a reverse of the Transition back to the ceremony.

                                  Good luck,
                                  Hunt
                                  • 14. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                                    Level 1
                                    It actually turned out much better than I thought it would. I used quite a few still shots from the photographer with the Cineform Pan, Zoom, Rotate effect. Being a one-camera shoot, I was toward the back, center-aisle and had zero shots of their faces while walking down the aisle, etc. This allowed me to show their faces - so in hindsight, I am glad that I got the photographer to give me all the shots of the ceremony. He did so free of charge - very cool of him. In exchange I am giving him a nice credit on the video, as well as editing together a 30-second video of him orchestrating his photo shoots, etc - in HDV. I called him today to tell him, and he is excited to get a .WMVHD clip of himself for his website. He asked for nothing, but I always like to take of people who helped me out. Truth be told, this video would have sucked without his stills.

                                    Thanks for all your comments/input. I know now why I don't generally do wedding shoots. As one post said, it is the here and now that matters - so I finally got off my butt and finished this. Unfortunately, it has been over a year - but they are indeed STILL together...

                                    -BChil
                                    • 15. Re: Suggestions for Covering Up For a Bad Tripod Move
                                      the_wine_snob Level 9
                                      Glad to hear it worked out fine. Nice touch with the credits and the demo-reel too.

                                      Hunt