13 Replies Latest reply on Jun 10, 2008 7:15 AM by Curt Wrigley

    Capture the output of the computer screen

    Andy Bay Level 1
      Hi!

      I'm really frustrated with one thing:

      I never seem to get results that I like using time remapping. But when I'm just scrubbing with my mouse on the timeline the motion is perfect. I can get really good looking time remaps just by moving my hand in the way I want. But how can I record this in a smart way? There must be some way to do it!

      I mean, I could always just put a videocamera on a stand and film my computer monitor while making the scrub but that would seem very stupid indeed. I could also try to use a screen capture software like camtasia, but I think those don't have framrates that are high enough and would because of that introduce jerkynes. Is there anything that I could connect on the DVI output of my videocard to record the picture with good results? What would be the professional way of doing this? Anyone?
        • 1. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
          Eddie Lotter Level 4

          Perhaps you don't fully understand the power of the force...er...time-remapping? Have a look at some of these and perhaps you will learn what you are missing. ;)


          Cheers
          Eddie

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          • 2. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
            Andy Bay Level 1
            I have been doing time remapping for many years, but I just don't find using rubberbands and curves to be as intuitive as using my hand movement. Maybe it's just me but I find it hard replicating the speed changes I can do by scrubbing the timeline, mainly because it is hard to tell at what speed the CTI is moving at different stages of the scrub being done by the hand. There is some serious bezier-like action going on in there and it feels too complicated and time consuming to try to replicate that when I could simply hit record and capture what is happening on the screen. I'm truly amazed if this is not possible and really think it would make a great new product for the video-editing world.

            Meanwhile I'm still trying to figure out the best way to capture what is happening on my computer screen. Is there any chance of using a digital video camera with a firewire connection for example to accomplish this? Or some kind of other device that could capture the dvi-signal as a video file? Surely there must be some way to record this!
            • 3. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
              Jim_Simon Level 8
              >What would be the professional way of doing this?

              Honestly? Learn how to use the effect.
              • 4. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                Andy Bay Level 1
                Look I do know how the effect works and have been using it for a long time both in After Effects and in Premiere. What I'm saying is that it is much more intuitive to do the speed changes with the mouse. Haven't you ever just been scrubbing on the timeline and seen some cool stuff happen that you would like to record? I'm not saying it is entirely impossible to replicate using rubberband and beziers, just that it's very hard and time consuming. It's like trying to paint a picture with the keyboard or trying to lead an orchestra using bezier curves: maybe it can be done but surely it is more convenient to do by hand.

                I'm sure also that time remapping is not the only situation in which one wishes to record the output of the computer screen.

                There has to be a better way to capture the output than recording it with a videocamera! :D
                • 5. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                  Jim_Simon Level 8
                  >Haven't you ever just been scrubbing on the timeline and seen some cool stuff happen that you would like to record?

                  I have. I then figured out a way to recreate that using an effect.

                  >maybe it can be done but surely it is more convenient to do by hand.

                  I personally am not arguing that. You asked how a professional would do it, so I answered.
                  • 6. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                    Andy Bay Level 1
                    What I really meant by asking how a professional would do it, was how a video professional would capture the video output of the computer screen. Never mind the time remapping part.
                    • 7. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                      Jim_Simon Level 8
                      I myself prefer hardware solutions for screen capture, but as that would include the entire GUI, that won't work for you.

                      I still recommend using the effect proper, which will allow for easy changes in the future.
                      • 8. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                        Andy Bay Level 1
                        What kinds of hardware solutions are you talking about? I'm ready to invest some money to get this possibility as I'm also doing other things that require screen capture.

                        I have two DVI outputs and I use currently two monitors so that the other monitor contains nothing but the preview screen. I was thinking of recording the picture of this monitor only.

                        I know it's possible (and recommended) to hook up an external tv-monitor to the computer to have a tv-screen preview while editing. So basically if it's possibly to view the preview screen in a television, then it can also be recorded by digital hard disk video recorders or other similar devices right? I'm just trying to find out what is the smartest way to capture the dvi-out.
                        • 9. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                          Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional
                          Andy,

                          You could attach a D/A video converter (like the Sony DVMC-DA2 or the Canopus ADVC 110) to your computer via firewire, and then connect that device to a camera or tape deck or even a DVDR.

                          Heck, you could probably just connect a camcorder via firewire, press Record on the camera, then scrub the timeline.

                          Once the tape had captured the video output, you capture the tape to get editable .avi files on disk.

                          -Jeff
                          • 10. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                            Jim_Simon Level 8
                            >What kinds of hardware solutions are you talking about?

                            Scan Converters
                            • 11. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                              akribie Level 2
                              Before going too far down the screen capture line, consider the difference in quality obtained during scrubbing in comparison with the final render.

                              If you think you have a good idea for an improvement to Premiere, then it would be a good idea to explain it in detail to Adobe so they can consider using your ideas.
                              http://www.adobe.com/cfusion/mmform/index.cfm?name=wishform
                              • 12. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                                Steven L. Gotz Level 5
                                So basically you want to request that you have a real time scrubber effect that works similar to the way the audio mixer works for levels. Adjust in real time and it sets the keyframes for you.

                                Interesting concept.
                                • 13. Re: Capture the output of the computer screen
                                  Curt Wrigley Level 4
                                  I dont recommend mixing time manipulation on the timeline with the physical world. That is very dangerous.

                                  I applied reverse time mapping to a still image once and at first i thought nothing happened, then I realized my studio slowly moving back in time instead of the still image. Fortunately all returned to normal after time reversed to the point where I applied the reverse time to the still.