24 Replies Latest reply on Jun 30, 2008 7:47 AM by Phil Griffith

    Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards

    Level 1
      OK, I just registered to the forum and this is my first post/question.
      I'm fairly new to Premiere Pro editing , and I wondered if there was a way to save the whole edited project/sequence to an external drive in case the client wanted changes to the project after they had viewed it.
      I edit mostly weddings, so the projects are anywhere from 1hr 30m to 1hr 50m. I've watched all the lynda.com tutorials on Premiere, and I know about saving the final project as an ISO image file or as DVD folder, etc.
      Also, I thought I remembered hearing something about being able to 'delete' the footage that wasn't used in the project too, and just saving the edited project somehow? I just thought I'd ask before I go ahead and delete all the footage that pertains to this edit. I've made an ISO file, but it doesn't look like Premiere will load it; nor will it load the video_ts files/folder.

      Anyway, so my questions are:
      1. Is there a way to load an ISO file to make editing changes?
      2. If not, then how could I save the whole project/sequence in order to load it back into Premiere to make any changes to the original edit?
      3. Does anyone here use Premiere for wedding edits? And if so, how do you 'save' projects for the longterm, in case you wanted to make changes to it?
      4. Once you have an ISO image file saved, how do you burn it through Encore? Or am I forced to use the Roxio Creator program?

      I guess that's it for now. I'm sure there are many more questions that I need answered, but I'll save them for later. :-)

      Thanks in advance for any and all suggestions!
        • 1. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
          Harm Millaard Level 7
          1. No.
          2. Copy all files to a separate disk.
          3. Yes, see above.
          4. Use IMGBURN.

          Remove Roxio at your earliest convenience, it creates havoc on your system.

          Why would you want to save old wedding projects? For the divorce proceedings?
          • 2. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
            the_wine_snob Level 9
            Marilyn,

            What Harm says (except his last line), also have a look at the Project>Project Manager (assume that it has not moved in CS3). That is what you are referring to, re: trimmed Projects.

            Save and catalog your tapes (can always re-capture, if necessary). Never reuse any of these for other reasons, as well.

            Save all of your Assets (I save my Captures, but see above).

            Use Project Manager to do most of the rest. The manual and F1 cover it pretty well, but come back if you can't find the answer to some of the settings. One note: if you use SmartSound for your background music, Project Manager does not normally store these, as far as I can tell, so make sure that you grab them too, when you archive your Assets.

            The Maxtor 1.5TB externals work well, and store well. Other sizes with just the capacity for your Projects might store better and cost less.

            Do not do weddings, but Jim Simon (on this forum) does, so he might have some specific suggestions.

            Welcome to the forum,

            Hunt
            • 3. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
              Level 1
              Thanks for your quick reply!<br />And LOL about the divorce proceedings.  I really should consider that, come to think of it.  Could be a wholllle new business.<br /><br />I usually save projects only to make changes to it. Whether it's a piece of music that I used that the client dislikes; or any kind of problem that might happen <ie: misspellings; wrong dates/names; etc>.  It's just easier to fix when you have the whole project/files handy.<br /><br />And I was looking up BluRay burning for Premiere on some of the boards, and I noticed that Roxio caused havoc with that particular issue, but didn't realize it might be a general problem with Premiere.<br /><br />I have Nero that I could use to burn ISO files with, but couldn't figure out where to specify the type of file I was using.  It seemed to just pick up 4 minutes of a 1hr 18m project/ISO file.<br /><br />So, where would one pick up IMGBURN?
              • 4. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                Level 1
                Thanks for your quick reply too, Hunt!
                I will attempt to follow everything you mentioned about saving the project and let you know if I have any questions. Now that you mention 'Trimmed Projects', I recognize that from what I saw in the tutorials that I watched.

                I have always used Maxtor external drives, and I agree that they work well. I recently purchased a 500gb drive, so I'll save everything to that.

                Thanks so much for all your info, and thanks for the welcome!
                I really appreciate it!
                • 5. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                  Phil Griffith Level 2
                  I do weddings and I usally leave my project open for a few weeks after delivery to cust. If everythings good, I make iso file and delete project.
                  • 6. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                    Level 1
                    Yes, that's what I usually do right now (when using Canopus RexEdit - I leave the project on the system, and create an Mpeg of the project afterwards). I suppose I shouldn't need it any longer than a few weeks, or just until the client is contacted and happy with the edit. (I'm used to the fact that the client is never contacted after they receive their DVD - because that's the way the video company that I edit for does it -, so I usually like to keep the project around in case of any changes). I suppose the 'no news is good news' addage could apply. :-)

                    And then, I guess the ISO file is enough to keep around for further copies, if they want more.
                    Thanks so much for the advice Phil!
                    • 7. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                      the_wine_snob Level 9
                      Marilyn,

                      i "I suppose I shouldn't need it any longer than a few weeks, or just until the client is contacted and happy with the edit."

                      Don't forget about your demo reel. There are also those "return projects," where some family member's status changes, and the bride and groom want a highlight reel strongly featuring the "dearly departed" Uncle Louie. Or that "divorce reel," that Harm talked about, where they want you to use the "Write-on Effect," everytime the groom (or bride) comes on screen...

                      I keep my eyes on a local electronics retailer's ads, and whenever the Maxtors (like I said, I use the 1.5TBs) go on sale, I pick up whatever their limit is, usually one/customer. In your case, I think the 500GBs would a better investment, and their prices are really falling, as the bigger discs gain popularity.

                      Hunt

                      [EDIT] Sorry, I forgot: http://www.imgburn.com/
                      • 8. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                        Jim_Simon Level 8
                        I do a LOT of weddings. Here's the process I've come up with over the years.

                        First, make a window dub of the whole thing. Sit down in front of a properly calibrated TV and home theater system and watch it from beginning to end. Make notes on what needs correction (here's where the visible timecode comes in handy) - music selections, audio levels, clips to be trimmed, color corrections, misspellings, etc.

                        Then, make those changes.

                        Next, author the final DVD for client review. Send that out with appropriate paperwork for a signed approval. Never delete/archive a project without client approval. Now, because some clients would take literally months to approve a project, I instituted a time limit of three weeks. After that, any project is considered approved and may be archived. I make this very clear, with the deadline in writing, when I send out the review sample.

                        If the video comes back for changes, things are still in place and I just make the requested changes, sending out another review copy with a two week limit this time. When an approval comes back or if a time limit passes, I finish up the project.

                        I make any remaining client copies, plus one copy of the DVD to go on a shelf. I also make an ISO for storage on an internal hard drive, to be moved later to an external hard drive at the end of every year. This gives me two master copies of the finished DVD.

                        I then save the project file, music and other audio selections, pictures and graphics to a CD (DVD if more space is needed, but this is rare). I make two copies in case one goes bad, and file them by groom's last name in a small CD file case. The previews and conformed files can always be rebuilt, so there's no need to save them. The actual media can be recaptured from tape, so they just get put on a shelf.
                        • 9. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                          Level 1
                          Bill,<br />Oh yeah, I forgot about demo reel stuff.  I was going to ask about the best way to get the beauty shots of my footage to keep.  I usually make avi's of them, when I work in RexEdit.<br />Can I use the subclip feature in Premiere to save my beauty shots for demo purposes <saving them to my external drive>, or are subclips just 'referring' to an original clip?<br />For example, instead of making a batch capture, I just made one clip per videotape.  <That's not usually how I like to capture footage, but this first edit on Premiere was a rush job, so I captured one 1-hr clip>.<br />So, two questions, really:<br />1. Can I make the subclips and save them separately to the external drive, in a 'Demo' folder?<br />and 2. When I DO do a batch capture, will I be able to save any of those batch clips to an external drive too, without having to change them into some other file type?<br /><br />I'm trying to figure out a systematic way of editing with this Premiere.  It doesn't really work like RexEdit, so it's kinda new to me, in a way.  I'm sorry for all the 'nonsense'-type questions.<br /><br />Thanks so much for taking the time to respond!<br /><br />And thanks for the imgburn link.  I'll have to check that out for sure.
                          • 10. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                            Jim_Simon Level 8
                            I find using Scene Detect during capture offers a faster worklflow than a single long clip.
                            • 11. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                              Level 1
                              Jim,
                              Thanks for the reply!
                              The idea of a window dub and overall view is a good idea. I've always gone into editing 'blind', since editing weddings is all chronological anyway. I usually just go along thru the day/footage, and edit what's there. Although, knowing what's coming up would be helpful.

                              Since I'm a freelance editor, I am never in contact with the client directly. And, I've stressed time and again to the videographers/companies that I edit for to create some sort of 'approval process'. Yours sounds alot like I would agree on. I will have to stipulate that to those that I work with then; give the videographer/company that same three week window, etc. That's only logical. That is plenty of time for approval.

                              As for 'saving the project file', what do you mean? Do you make the Premiere sequence/timeline its own file? AVI? MPEG?
                              Or is this an ISO image made thru Encore? That's what I am using to make my DVDs.

                              I also posted a question about demo reel stuff, beauty shots for demos, etc. If you save images like that, how do you go about that?

                              Thanks so much for all the advice! I really appreciate your time and suggestions!
                              • 12. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                Level 1
                                I didn't know about scene detect. That's a HUGE help!
                                Thanks Jim!!
                                • 13. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                  the_wine_snob Level 9
                                  Jim,<br /><br />Thanks for weighing in. I had warned, er-r <cough> mentioned you to Marilyn. I knew you could help her.<br /><br />Thanks for mentioning the Preview, PEK, etc. files, as I had forgotten those.<br /><br />@Marilyn,<br /><br />You're in good hands now!<br /><br />Hunt
                                  • 15. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                    Level 1
                                    > Next, author the final DVD for client review. Send that out with appropriate paperwork for a signed approval.

                                    Eh? You actually send a proof copy of a wedding? Then wait for changes to be requested?

                                    > Never delete/archive a project without client approval.

                                    I archive it for 60 days, then it's gone if I need the space.

                                    >Now, because some clients would take literally months to approve a project, I instituted a time limit of three weeks.

                                    Now you're talking. I assume they're paying you extra to re-edit?

                                    > After that, any project is considered approved and may be archived.

                                    I just want to make sure we're talking about "weddings" here. I do 40-60 a year and there's now way I'd be able to follow this workflow.
                                    • 16. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                      Jim_Simon Level 8
                                      >since editing weddings is all chronological anyway

                                      Only if your creativity is limited.

                                      Von Training.com

                                      >As for 'saving the project file', what do you mean?

                                      Premiere projects have the .prproj extension. Like Encore projects have the .ncor extension. Those are the files I'm referring to.

                                      >You actually send a proof copy of a wedding?

                                      You don't? How else are you going to know that the bride and groom are totally happy with their one and only, for the rest of their lives, wedding video. You have to allow them the opportunity to change things they don't like.

                                      >I assume they're paying you extra to re-edit?

                                      Only if the requested changes come after the deadline. Any changes submitted in writing before then are included in the package price.

                                      >I just want to make sure we're talking about "weddings" here.

                                      We are. And honestly, I couldn't consider myself a fair business man without that workflow. Every part of it needs to be there.
                                      • 17. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                        Jim_Simon Level 8
                                        >I will have to stipulate that to those that I work with then; give the videographer/company that same three week window, etc.

                                        When I work with outside editors, they know that they need to keep the project 'live' until I tell them it's approved. But as I have my own approval process, there will always be a definite end in sight. I can see where it gets frustrating when the production company won't/can't give you a finite deadline for approval and archive.
                                        • 18. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                          Jim_Simon Level 8
                                          >demo reel stuff, beauty shots for demos, etc. If you save images like that, how do you go about that?

                                          I keep a separate folder on the media drive called Samples, and keep finished DV clips in there.
                                          • 19. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                            Level 1
                                            Jim,
                                            One more clarification...
                                            I will be using that Scene Detect when I capture my next footage, so that will allow me to have it separated into clips.
                                            Now, will those clips be the clips that I could save for my demo stuff?
                                            I ask, because with RexEdit, the capture there creates reference files, so the clips aren't really 'stand alone' clips. you couldn't save only a few clips without keeping ALL the footage on the system. (I believe the company captures reference-type because it takes up less space, etc. In RexEdit, you can capture one of two ways - reference, and avi)
                                            So my question is:
                                            When capturing in Premiere, these would be 'stand alone' clips, rather than reference clips? In other words, I have 100 clips. I could save 15 clips and delete the rest of them?

                                            Thanks again for all the advice!
                                            And I'll definitely check out that von training site.
                                            • 20. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                              Level 1
                                              > You don't?

                                              Definately not. I don't even think Mark and Trish VonLaken do this any more. Nothing else brings your business to a screeching halt than waiting for a client to decide things much less "inviting" them to make changes after the edit.

                                              > How else are you going to know that the bride and groom are totally happy with their one and only, for the rest of their lives, wedding video.

                                              What's not to like the first time? Didn't they hire you based on your own style to begin with which you've shown them in demos/samples? Most of us that do this full time have a creative clause in our agreements giving us full control on how their wedding is presented but again, it always reflects past work which they've seen (and want).
                                              • 21. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                                Level 1
                                                > In other words, I have 100 clips. I could save 15 clips and delete the rest of them?

                                                Yes, scene detect will physically "splice" the footage.

                                                >Now, will those clips be the clips that I could save for my demo stuff

                                                Do you mean save clips to create a demo reel later on? I print out a master copy of the couple's final (edited) DVD to tape and just use this to create demo material.
                                                • 22. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                                  Level 1
                                                  Hey Elvis,
                                                  Yes, I mean I like to save the best shots of the raw footage clips in a folder when I'm done with the client. I don't want to have to go back to original tape (or edited tape) and take shots from there to create a new demo. If I've already spent countless hours on a wedding edit, I just want to be able to save the good stuff/clips in a demo folder on an external drive for later use.
                                                  • 23. Re: Premiere Pro CS3 - How to Save a Final Project to Make Changes to Afterwards
                                                    Jim_Simon Level 8
                                                    >will those clips be the clips that I could save for my demo stuff?

                                                    If you want, sure. I normally keep finished segments, though. If an Opening or Interlude or Highlights section comes out nice, I'll keep that in my Samples folder as a DV file.

                                                    >Nothing else brings your business to a screeching halt than waiting for a client to decide things

                                                    On the contrary. I have the hard drive space to move on to the next project while I wait. And there is a time limit for approval, so I won't be waiting forever. Very few come back for changes, and those that two are fairly minor. But with that option, you know that the bride and groom are getting exactly the video that they want.

                                                    >What's not to like the first time?

                                                    Usually it's song choice. I've used a song they don't particularly like, or didn't use one they really want to hear. But occasionally I've used a clip they want me to cut, or there's a deleted scene they want put back in.

                                                    Client approval is the norm in the video production business. I'd never let a TV station run a commercial they made for me unless I said it was perfect. A corporate client will always want to review their new training video. It's no different for weddings. Even photographers send out proof sheets.