17 Replies Latest reply on Jul 17, 2008 9:47 PM by Dan Isaacs

    Dissapointing Imported Files Support

      First off, I love Adobe Premiere CS3, but I am getting a little frustrated with it, I am also wondering if other are having problems too, but over half of my files will not import into adobe premiere cs3 most are mpegs (mpeg2), every time I go to import a file it either crashes or it says that file not supported, I think its ironic that windows movie maker a free program will open most of my files yet a xxx dollar professional program wont touch them.

      Do others have this many problems with importing files? any suggestions on why I do and how to fix it? I really do not like having to transcode all of my videos to wmv or avi in windows media player before importing them into premier. its just one more step in a long process.

      also file support, I really do not want to have to pay extra to be able to import a file, adobe please next time get the licensing for codecs and bundle it even if I have to pay xxx more, it makes life much less complicated.
        • 1. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
          Harm Millaard Level 7
          Did you capture right from your camera?
          • 2. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
            Jim_Simon Level 8
            >I think its ironic that windows movie maker a free program will open most of my files yet a xxx dollar professional program wont touch them.

            Maybe not so much. MPEG was originally designed for watching. They don't make the best source material for editing. Professionals don't use them much. Mostly it's the non-professionals that try to edit them, so I can see why a non-professional program might handle them better than a professional one.
            • 3. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
              Level 1
              I understand that most profesionals do not use mpegs as source files, but when thats all you have, i.e. darn dvd camcorder, their is not much you can do, also some of these are files I have archived as hq mpegs (much smaller than avis) but none the less if I am paying for a upper level product in theory it should work for lower level stuff as well.

              Also I failed to mention that AVCHD is not supported, now while adobe might not think it worthwile, if the customer needs/wants it they should offer it. not tell use we have to buy a 300 dollar program to make it work in premiere.

              My biggest question is do other have problems like I do? what worries me the most is that it crashes 9 times out of 10 when it wont import a file. I have tried it on two computers, but it crashes either way, btw I am running vista!!!!!
              • 4. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                Harm Millaard Level 7
                > btw I am running vista!!!!!

                That is your biggest mistake.

                > files I have archived as hq mpegs (much smaller than avis) but none the less if I am paying for a upper level product in theory it should work for lower level stuff as well.

                No, there are consumer applications for that like WMM or Elements. BTW what do you mean by HQ MPEGS?

                > Also I failed to mention that AVCHD is not supported, now while adobe might not think it worthwile, if the customer needs/wants it they should offer it

                And for good reason. There is no attractive customer base to make it feasible at a competitive price for the moment.
                • 5. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                  Level 1
                  Well, I am a computer scientist, and like vista, oh well,

                  I still do not understand, I know that their are programs like elements etc, but from a programing standpoint, when I create a waterdown program the standard or pro can do everything the "elements" version can do, why cant they do this, I am not a profesional editor, but I am not a novice either, I had elements way back at version 1.0 loved it but I out grew it so I got cs3, expecting to see the features of elements in cs3, dont get me wrong I love adobe products, I bought the whole cs master collection, and I love every program including premiere, but I just wish they could have added support for these things, I understand the argument that they would possibly make the program bigger and slower, but a good programmer would make it work! if all else fails make it an option in install,

                  if their is no market base for AVCHD will you please email sony and inform them of this, they might not know this, as many of their cameras are AVCHD,

                  also my HQ mpegs, are the max the dvd standard will allow, as my final medium is dvd, and again these are backups I figured that would work, the irony is that many were made in premiere elements 1.0,

                  I understand that premiere does not support avchd, we will leave it at that, but it supports mpegs, so why will it not import many othem that work in many other programs?
                  • 6. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                    Steven L. Gotz Level 5
                    AVCHD can easily be converted to HV with a $50 program.

                    The MPEG that Premiere Pro is designed to capture is HDV, not lower DVD quality material with unsupported audio codecs.
                    • 7. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                      Jim_Simon Level 8
                      >when thats all you have, i.e. darn dvd camcorder, their is not much you can do

                      Use a consumer program to match the consumer camera, is my general advice. If you want to use a professional program, step up to a more professional camera as well.

                      >if I am paying for a upper level product in theory it should work for lower level stuff as well.

                      I find that an arbitrary assertion. There's plenty of professional audio gear that will only take XLR connections, leaving RCA for consumer gear. Likewise there's plenty of video gear that has only a more professional BNC connection. Sony themselves make Digital Cinema cameras that can only use the Sony Professional Disc, which is basically a pro version of the consumer Blu-ray format.

                      It's pretty common for professional level tools to work only with professional level assets. People get into trouble when they try and mix levels. Don't do that, and you should be fine.
                      • 8. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                        Steven L. Gotz Level 5
                        I keep hearing the same argument over and over. Use professional formats with a professional application.

                        That just isn't always an option. We work with what we have. If I need to mix DV, HDV, graphics and the occasional cell phone video, I don't feel like being told that Premiere Pro should not be used. In my opinion, Premiere Pro ought to be able to import just about anything. Or Adobe could supply a conversion tool.

                        I know that is not the case, and I know that there are lots of other things that Premiere Pro is missing, more important things. But that is no excuse for not having the ability to import any footage playable in Quicktime, Windows Media Player or VLC.

                        Even professionals get stuck with supplied footage that is not optimal. Why not supply a conversion tool in the Creative Suite?
                        • 9. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                          Level 1
                          Thats exactly my point steven thanks for summing it up in a way I just could not express, Even though some codecs/files are not the best quality, but hey we still unfortunetly have to use them sometimes,
                          • 10. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                            Jim_Simon Level 8
                            >If I need to mix DV, HDV, graphics and the occasional cell phone video...

                            Therein lies the crux of the issue. The professional will likely know how to convert his media to something usable, and so will not be here asking why his media doesn't work. He already knows why, and can handle it.

                            Most of the folks complaining that their videos don't work don't really need to use unprofessional sources. They just want to, meaning most of them are hobbyists and just fooling around. For that consumer level of user, I offer the general advice to use a consumer level program for their consumer level media.

                            There are exceptions to the above, of course, but I find overall it applies more often than not.

                            >In my opinion, Premiere Pro ought to be able to import just about anything.

                            I personally disagree, believing it would only end up causing more issues than it solves with the attendant bugs that would accompany such a code behemoth. But even if Adobe agrees with you and ends up going that way, until they do, either a conversion will have to happen, or you'll have to use other software. For the hobbyists, I usually recommend the other software route. Like it or not, that is a valid method of solving the problem.

                            >Or Adobe could supply a conversion tool.

                            Now that one I agree with. I've said more than once I'd love to see the Adobe Media Encoder made a separate application. It would read any Premiere sequence directly for export, but it would also be able to ingest any format, and convert to any format, kind of like Sorrenson Squeeze, but included with Premiere for free.
                            • 11. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                              Dan Isaacs Level 2
                              > The professional will likely know how to convert his media to something usable

                              Well, I'm a professional and I assumed that I would be able to use HDV captures in my DV projects... and sure enough I could, but little did I know that they would look like crap (bad scaling, wrong colors). Premiere apparently can't natively support even the formats it supposedly supports. I searched high and low for a solution that would give me the quality I was looking for. Finding none, I wrote my own.

                              > attendant bugs that would accompany such a code behemoth

                              Code behemoth? VirtualDub is about 1.5 MB and handles just about every .AVI I've ever thrown at it. The core of AviSynth is even smaller and can read even more types files.

                              That's what the VFW, ACM and DirectShow interfaces are for: As long as the codecs and/or filters are installed, Windows apps should be able to read them. I know that Adobe has "hardwired" their DV and MPEG2 TS to "exclusive" filters, such as the dumbed-down Main Concept codec, which fine and a good idea. This no reason not to support VFW and DirectShow at least as well as, say, Windows Media Player does.
                              • 12. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                                Jim_Simon Level 8
                                >VirtualDub is about 1.5 MB and handles just about every .AVI I've ever thrown at it.

                                It also does a hell of a lot less with those files than Premiere would be required to do. And AviSynth has no GUI to contend with (unfortunately).
                                • 13. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                                  Dan Isaacs Level 2
                                  > It also does a hell of a lot less with those files than Premiere would

                                  It needs to do only one thing: Decompress.

                                  Ironically, I don't recall having trouble with any .AVI files in Premiere 6.5.
                                  • 14. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                                    shooternz Level 6
                                    Dan... Curiosity only ...but are you working in Premiere with any HD type media?

                                    (Sorry for thread jack)
                                    • 15. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                                      Dan Isaacs Level 2
                                      No, actually ... aside from testing stuff. I always edit in SD, pre-converting HD material to DV (and/or lossless). Most of what I do is for DVD, CD-ROM and web delivery. No real need for HD (yet).
                                      • 16. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                                        shooternz Level 6
                                        How are you "pre converting" HD material to SD? ie From what to DV and how? (Why?)
                                        • 17. Re: Dissapointing Imported Files Support
                                          Dan Isaacs Level 2
                                          > How are you "pre converting" HD material to SD?

                                          (*.m2t) DGIndex -> AviSynth -> VirtualDub (*.avi)

                                          The gist of the process is explained here, but instead of frameserving from Premiere, I frameserve the MPEG2 TS from DGIndex. Instead of encoding to MPEG2, I write DV .avi files from VirtualDub.

                                          It sounds more complicated than it is. In reality, I just capture the HDV and then batch it all out to DV. It takes some time to convert, but very little effort (once the process was established).

                                          1.) I run a .bat file to create the indexes from the MPEG2 TS files
                                          2.) I use a batch scripting utility to generate the AviSynth scripts
                                          3.) I put the scripts in a common folder and choose "Process Directory" from VirtualDub
                                          4.) Do anything I like while I wait for the process to finish

                                          Steps 1 through 3 take about 5 minutes total. Step 4? Well, that depends on how many clips and how long they are.

                                          You can do a similar process for AVCHD files using DGAVCIndex. You can skip the "indexing" part for HD .AVI files, like Matrox or Cineform.

                                          > Why?

                                          1.) It looks better: a ... b (better colors, less interlacing artifacts, better sharpness, more accurate PAR, less noise)
                                          2.) You get much better performance editing in SD if you only plan to deliver in SD.