9 Replies Latest reply on Aug 1, 2008 12:22 PM by the_wine_snob

    Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?

      Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?

      I am looking for a program that I can:
      Import files that were recorded on a DVR (mp4 format)
      Take two files placed next to each other on one screen and record a DVD
      _______________ _______________
      | | | |
      | | | |
      | image one | | image two |
      | | | |
      |______________| |_______________|

      Also export the files to other file formats, AVi, MOV
        • 1. Re: Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?
          Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional
          No.

          Google for Womble MPEG Video Wizard or TMPGEnc Xpress.
          • 2. Re: Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?
            Level 1
            I dont think I was clear in my message.
            I want to have two files placed next to each other on one screen. Something like a split screen, right side has a video clip and the left side has a different video clip.
            • 3. Re: Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?
              John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP
              Premiere is NOT going to work well to edit MP4 files

              Do as Jeff said and look at those other programs

              Or, go read in the Premiere Elements forum... and ask there about using MP4 as edit source files
              • 5. Re: Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?
                the_wine_snob Level 9
                Dave,

                Premiere can do a PiP, Picture in Picture (basically, your PiP is one half of the frame), BUT your MP4 source is not the best to edit, especially with PP. If you had DV-AVI files, Captured in PP from a miniDV (tape) vid-cam, it would do a great job, but so would its little brother Premiere Elements, which wants the same source files as PP.

                I have not used Womble, that Jeff recommends, but think that it has PiP. Ideally, you want to keep any re-compression down to a minimum, as you are already working with compressed MPEG files, and every additional re-compression WILL cause image degredation. Depending on the CODEC used to create your MP4 files, you have probably lost a lot of info already, and when you go to MPEG-2 (DV CODEC), for DVD, you'll loose even more. About the only way that I see you keeping any quality is if your MP4's are coded for Blu-Ray, and you can find a program with Smart Render, leaving them just as they are, allowing you to edit, then burning to a BD. Lot of "if's" in that.

                I'd check out Womble and see if it can do PiP and if it works with MP4. If Jeff recommended it, it's very likely to do that. Juat expect a major quality hit, because you're already compressed the heck out of the image data once, and will have to do it again.

                You could convert your MP4's to DV-AVI with a 3rd party program, Import them into PP, or PE, edit and then burn to DVD - with Encore in PP, or directly from PE. See above for comments on quality hit. It's those source files that are the problem. That format is meant for distribution/viewing and not for editing. The effect, however, is easy as can be. There are many tutorials on how to do it with variations, on the Web, but nearly all NLE programs want better source material to start, if any quality is to be maintained.

                I'd also post on the Premiere Elements forum, as a lot of people there work with less than ideal source files, and might know of good free, or cheap, conversion programs to use. If you have the CODEC on your machine, DigitalMedia Converter can handle the conversion for you, and do it in batch. It's cheap at ~ US$45, and can batch process, but it cannot improve the quality, or get back the data lost in the first compression - nothing can.

                If this is all you want to do, with the above comments on conversion first taken seriously, Premiere Elements will cost about US$100 and do it easily.

                Sorry for the bad news,

                Hunt
                • 6. Re: Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?
                  Level 1
                  Thank you Hunt for all that information! And I was under the impression that MPG4 files were of great quality
                  I did download the Womble program and yes it has PIP. (thanx Jeff)
                  That is what I ended up doing with my two video files for now. It worked but not what I am looking for the job at hand.

                  Thanx again
                  Dav
                  • 7. Re: Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?
                    Jim_Simon Level 8
                    >And I was under the impression that MPG4 files were of great quality

                    They can be, for watching. Which is all that your DVR is using them for, and probably all that you should be using them for. Reediting TV shows is illegal.
                    • 8. Re: Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?
                      John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP
                      Aside from the legal issues (Jim is right) Standard Def MPEG files of ANY codec are designed to watch, not to edit

                      Some reading at my notes page

                      Based on reading a LOT of problem reports, importing files from a DVD or hard drive camcorder or other MPEG device (including digital STILL cameras that create MJPEG files) or trying to edit divx, or Ripping DVD files rarely results in success in Premiere... do not be fooled by movie industry advertising into thinking that "DVD Quality Video" is suitable for EDITING... it is not... a DVD is designed to be for PLAYBACK only... and that includes trying to edit a Standard Def MPEG or VOB file!

                      You should also use WAV sound files, not the compressed MP3 format

                      The only SD (Standard Def) files that Premiere really likes are DV AVI type 2 (be sure you have type 2 and not DV AVI type 1 files)

                      HD (High Definition) files are a completely different issue... I don't use HD, so can't say anything about editing those files

                      Go to my notes page http://www.pacifier.com/~jtsmith/ADOBE.HTM

                      Click the internal link for editing compressed files... read, there are some ideas & links there, including some links to other programs that have been mentioned in the Premiere forum as being better suited to editing MPG files... if you want to edit a divx file, start at http://www.divx.com/

                      If you only have DVD type files, you should convert to DV AVI type 2 or use different software... go to the VideoHelp link in my notes and look for a program to convert... but do be aware that converting from a HIGHLY compressed viewing format back to an editing format is going to cause a drop in quality

                      PS - To work with AC3 sound files in Premiere CS3, it MAY work to copy the ad2ac3dec.dll file from the Encore CS3 directory into the Premiere directory
                      • 9. Re: Is Premiere Pro CS3 the right program for me?
                        the_wine_snob Level 9
                        Dave,

                        To answer your question - exactly what Jim and John said.

                        Hunt