11 Replies Latest reply on Jan 5, 2009 7:06 AM by Jeff Bellune

    exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP

      please can anyone help me... i have to present a 15min video which is to be shown on a 18foot wide screen, i am worried that the finished dvd might look pixelated or blurry, i dont mind if its shown in widescreen, can anyone tell me what the best settings are to use when exporting to keep it clear? i really really appreciate any advice given, thankyou! sarah
        • 1. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
          John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP
          Use the highest video bitrate possible... I think that is 7k which then allows for audio to all fit inside the maximum total bitrate

          Since a DVD has a set size (NTSC: 720x480 or PAL: 720x576) you may not change that
          • 2. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
            Jim_Simon Level 8
            >i am worried that the finished dvd might look pixelated or blurry

            That's enough of a given at that screen size to eliminate DVD as a viable possibility. Shoot in HD and deliver on Blu-ray.
            • 3. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
              Level 1
              thankyou John T Smith and Jim Simon, i will take on board everything you have said! thankyou once again for your quick replies
              • 4. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
                Jim_Simon Level 8
                >the highest video bitrate possible...is 7k

                Just as an FYI, Encore allows it to go up to 8.6 Mbps. 7Mbps is an artificial cap and wholly unnecessary. It should die as a piece of advice.
                • 5. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
                  Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional
                  > It should die as a piece of advice

                  As should advising against editing MPEG2, MPEG4 or any other modern temporally compressed format.
                  • 7. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
                    Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional
                    And on that other thing you mentioned. :)
                    • 8. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
                      Jim_Simon Level 8
                      Ah, but that one I can back up with practical results. My disagreement is more 'philosophical'.
                      • 9. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
                        Ruud Blauw Level 1
                        >Ah, but that one I can back up with practical results.

                        As can I for the opposite. :) Lets just say that the "7Mb/s" thing is your "Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam" and that we will have to live with it that whenever that particular piece of useful advice is given you will put in your statement that it is utter nonsense.
                        • 10. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
                          John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP
                          I did not save any of the discussion links, but I do know that several (more than one!) times people have reported problems with playback... and those problems were fixed when they were advised to set their maximum video rate to 7k

                          I also know that "some" people report editing problems with SD MPG source files, while "other" people report success... which may be due to the individual file's settings, what edits were being done or the exact computer or software configuration for those who have been able to do (some) editing of MPG files... but the "usual" case is that MPG doesn't work well as an edit source for SD

                          Same goes for using MP3 sound... works for some, not for others

                          Same goes for using JPG pictures... works for some, not for others

                          I think this is a case where what works for YOU may, or may not, work for ME

                          Speaking of JPG/MP3... I once took a couple hundred digital pictures I had made while building our last house, added sound ripped from a piano CD, and made a single layer DVD that was about 3.5 hours long to play as background at our first party at that house... nothing fancy about the video, but all JPG's from 2-3 different cameras and the MP3 sound track worked perfectly
                          • 11. Re: exporting for presentation for a 18 foot screen HELP
                            Jeff Bellune Adobe Community Professional
                            WARNING: OT post with lots of self-serving comments...

                            Through 2 versions of Premiere (6.0 and 6.5), and now 5 versions of Premiere Pro, the only format/codec combination that I have had trouble with importing or editing is Type-1 DV .avi. Every other .avi codec I've tried (including DivX) has worked as expected.

                            I've thrown muxed .mpg files, elementary MPEG streams, AC3 audio, .mp3 audio and every still image format in my Photoshop library at Premiere Pro and been successful in importing, editing and exporting.

                            This has been done across 3 different production machines and 2 laptop computers. I've used ATI cards, Nvidia cards and IBM integrated graphics chips. I've used Soundblaster audio cards, M-Audio cards and integrated RealTek audio.

                            I have installed and uninstalled many plug-ins for Premiere Pro, and my system keeps right on working with impressive reliability.

                            Am I just "lucky"? Or is there something else involved?

                            I am cautious to the point of paranoia about keeping unwanted crap off of my production machine. I image my system drive often, and I have images of my system at various stages of OS and application configurations, from a squeaky clean OS install with all updates and service packs, to a minimal utility and production configuration, to my full-blown production configuration. I can return my system to any state that I want in less than 30 minutes.

                            I adhere as much as possible to the theory that "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". I don't update graphics card drivers or video card drivers unless I have to. I don't swap out or upgrade hardware components unless a demonstrable performance or stability improvement will come with the upgrade.

                            I keep my data (including my rendered media and projects) organized and backed up. I always have 2 exact mirror copies of my current data: one on an internal hard drive and one on my laptop. I have images of my data backed up on external drives. The images can go back as much as a year from the present time.

                            I regularly clean out my system and user temp files, and have a reliable utility examine and fix my registry. I keep all of my drives defragged and I run chkdsk frequently to ensure that all of my drive sectors are healthy. I recently had a batch of Seagate 500GB internal drives fail on me over the course of several days. They took out my RAID5 and my primary data drive. The only thing I lost was one morning's captured media. When the last Seagate drive failed and took out my OS, I was up and running 14 minutes after replacing the faulty drive.

                            The downside is that all these things take time, preparation and some level of technical computer knowledge. When I don't know the answer to why something is working one way or another, I do research and figure out why it does that. I don't expect my production system to be like a toaster - where you turn it on and off, use it, and never give a second thought to how it works or how to care for it. My system is more like a VCR, and I know how to make the blinking "12:00" go away. A successful editor will know how to do that, or will hire someone who knows how to do that.

                            Food for thought.

                            -Jeff